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/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



Sub Exp Dad 

« state Htatorieal society 

Hon 

PO Box 35 

•301 



fcdge, Page 5 




M « N kstjlccollcgian o mi 



Thursday, November 10,2005 



Vol UO.No W 



French 

riots felt 

locally 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANSAS STATKOUfGt AN 

Although France lost New Orleans in 
the Loutnatu I'urchase more than 200 
years ago, the two are starting to look quite 
siim 

the French tints enter their 14lh day, 

is still uncertainty about what to do 

for hoth the long- and short-term prob- 

Ever since the accidental deaths of 
two French-Arab teens, allegedly while 
they were hiding frum the police, France 
has been unable u> Mem the violence that 
has spread from the Mediterranean in the 
south to the northern border 

The rioters arc predominately Arab and 
North African, and arc composed of a mix- 
ture ranging from immigrants to second 
and third-generation French citizens. 

Charles Reagan, associate In the presi- 

I has been (raveling to and studying 
Prance since the 19* 

They're alienate J from the Arabic 
culture Man} dun'l speak Arabic and 
frequently don't speak French that well, 
either," Reagan said "They're caught be 
tweefl two cultures, French and Arab, and 
that's part of die root of their alienation." 

Dale Herspring, professor of political 
science, said the alienation comes with all 
i the population. 

"The French have not put a great 
inlrj integrating these neopk," Herspring 
adding that the isolationist altitude 
mndered efforts thai have been made 



SeeFRANCtPioel 



Morrison 
changes 
parties 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS STAIKOt I f&IAN 

[ohnaon County District Attorney Paul 
Morrison recently announced plans to 
challenge Phi 1 1 Kline next year for state at- 
torney general 

In a press conference, Morrison said he 
plans to switch political 
parties from Republican 
(■i I k-mocrai to make the 
challenge 

By changing his a till i 
Li'ioii on the ballot, some 
Kansas Democrats laid 
they feel betrayed 

I Ins statv will soon 
be left to nothing, with 
more and more Repub 
hearts gaining control, 
Manhattan resident jen- 
i nttr Blackwell said, "As 
a Democrat, I am now 
forced to not have ;mv 
representation on the 
ballot and to vote for 
someone who doesn't 
share any of my views. 
Will the little man, us 
minority parties, get any 
chance U> prevail'"' 

In 2004, I he Kansas Secretary of State 
i' polled Kansas voters, with 27 per 
cent registered Democrats and 46 percent 
registered Republicans 

When Kline won the popular vote in 
2002, Morrison, then, said he was rather 
upset with the turnout Morrison said with 
Kline's focuses on abortion and issues out- 
side his jurisdiction, he posed an executive 
threat to the stale 

People should overlook Morrison's 
switch in political party and focus more on 

See SWITCH Pigrg 




Morrison 




Kline 




Nature of reality 

New organization looks to expand 
Buddhist faith to Manhattan community 

FAITH ON CAMPUS 




Photo ■ by Citrfna Rawton | Li 
ABOVE: Christina Hauck, associate professor of English and a Buddhist, meditates Wednesday afternoon in her home. 
Hauck said she usually meditates twice a day. 

TOP: Resting on Hauck's altar are items representing the Buddhist religion. 



The fourth of a five pan serifs exploring 
the beliefs of teligious groups on campus. 



By Haley Lyon 

KAN', i. IAN 

A- • 
lion nai ' intbht >i 

le Buddhisti with 
"itlct to praen 
reli; 
virontn 

"Because of tt 
are a lot of international itudi 
coating Into the community who 
adftH Buddhism," said 

Mariko True graduati H in 

curriculum and instruction, "not 
onrj student*, bie 

searchers as well 

The group is ecumenical 
is open to pi ople ol any faith i 

• an Interest in the Buddhist way 
of life It has 10 iu< 
like m 

"We 
pie coming unto I Brra us 

lo I. 

based on Buddhi >iid 

Kltl 

that 

Bud, iiallv 

years ago when Siddhartl 
tama, lent ■ 

Son 

through that, (he nature 

Reiij .nil d into two 

religion 
and subject religion < ibjed religion 
■ i 
v above hu h is 

the basi;> ol most religions Sub 

teaches thai divinity, exists 
mum natu 

ek for some' 

superior." Pric« said 'We seek i 

Diony with the universe and seek in 
g OU1 the best in ourselves" 

This philosophy «.is nanded 
down 10 Hauck, who practices Bud- 
dhism in the KwHI Um School nf 
which is derived from the Ko- 
■ 
"Budd instil is probably the only 
subject religion," Hauck said We 
Buddhi ohm 

See BUDDHISM Pane 8 



Author investigates, traces family history to Manhattan 



By Tessa French 

KANSAS STATE (Of I EQ AN 

Stephen Hanks has spent more 
than 10 years researching his family 
history. 

"I came to Manhattan because 
I wanted lo stop at every (own my 
ancestors had been through," Hanks 
said during a present, iiion Wednesday 
night at the Riley County 1 1 
Museum. "Manhattan is where my 
dad grew up, and then he went into 
the Navy Eventually tie was stationed 
at Portland, and made his home there 
which is where I live today," 

His interest in gene.dogy began in 
luly 1989, when a funetai letter ar- 
rived from Manhattan The oMtttU] 
was for his great uncle, Murt Hanks, 
the first African-American mayor of 
Manhattan. 

I got to reading the names of 
all these people I'd never heard of," 
Hanks said I immediately started go- 



ing through the family Men and ended 
up finding some information and a 
few photos" 

flanks said lib I utceston 

was not an easy journey. He traveled 
to several stati not- 

chives, wrote many letters requesting 
information and conducted numerous 
inlervi 

"Thai's what you have to do tn 
genealogy, interview people^ Hanks 
said. 

Seven! members of the audience 
were also active in searching out (hen 
nuestry. 

"When doing genealogy research, 
the probate records are especially 
helpful," he said 

Hanks was able to kCSM several 
names of his ancestors as they were 
listed as property under their slave 
owner's name 

When doing African- Amcrii an 

history, you have to also research and 

the whereabouts of the slave 




ownet and find out everything about 
I Ik tn," Hanks said. 

Hanks also wrote a book about his 
ancestry titled 'Akee Tree, A Destcn 
dant's Search for his Ancestors on the 
I skndge Plantations" 

"Part of the book is an investi- 
gate research, and the other part is 
a family narrative" he said The talc 



Author Stephen 
Hanks, resident of 
Portland, Ore., talks to 
attendees about his 
book, "Akee Tree, A 
Descendant s Search 
for his Ancestors on 
the Eskridge Planta- 
tions," and tells about 
his troubles tracking 
down his family's 
genealogy. 



Steven Doll |(0t I (CIAN 

explains how Hanks eventually de. 
covered his family's life through 
140 years of slavery, uses 

on four of his women ancestors: 
Akey, [enny, Rose and Eliza Later 
in the hook. Hanks wrote about his 
African lineage, and his trip lo West 



See ANCESTRY P*qe S 



Today 



■m 



High 66 
Low 43 



Friday 



High 74 
Low 54 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Inappropriate campaign Jordan chaos 



The father of former K- State student 
Ali Kemp, who was slain three yean 
ago, says he doesn't want hei case 
involved in next year's tare fat at 
tomey general Roger Kemp told the 
Kansas City Stat, "I flat out will not get 
involved in any political campaign, 
period. I don't want Alt involved" 



At least 5 7 people were killed and 1 1 4 
injured after suicide bombers earned 
out nearly simultaneous attacks on 
three U.S -based hotels intheioida 
nian capital Wednesday night. Jordan's 
deputy pflme minister, Marwan 
Muashei, said there was no claim of 
responsibility but that Abu Musab 
al-Zargawi was a "prime suspect." 



Miller retires 

Judith Millet has retired from the New 
York Times, the paper announced 
Wednesday Millet spent 85 days 
in jail this summer for refusing lo 
testify about her conversations with 
a confidential source. "I respect net 
decision to retire from the Times and 
wish her well,*Times publrshei Arthut 
Sulzberger Jr said in a statement 



DON'T FORGET 



Students with 21 or more 
credit hours ait eligible to 

enroll today 

The Internal Ag Panel will 
meet at 6 tonight in Waters 
Hi, 



The KSU Fatuity Brass 

Quintet will play at ?:Kl 
tonight in the All Faiths 
Chapel, 



B* 



^^^^^m^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



wmmmmm 






Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 10,2005 




treme, 

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Mil ksi i ict\ IUTSIDE LOOKING IN. 

[iiin|iii|> Clue K equal* i > 



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SupiJiJitive services for 
pregnancy, parenting & 

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Totnill Irjnfidential service 
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DIVERSIONS 

A waste of time, but hey, it's better than lecture 



How well do you know your movies? 



1 . "Worrying is like a rocking (hair. It gives 

you something to do, but It doesn't get you 

anywhere.' 

A, The lion KJ 

BVanWildei 

C.PracttalMagk 



2. "We're on a mission from God.' 
A The Blues Brothers 
B Saved 

( Kingdom of Hw 




J. "Apparently, there's a teak . 

A Pir<vi< ; 'heart 

B. Into The Blue 
( Watetworld 



4. "I see Blue; he looks glorious." 

A. Ice Age 
B Fight Club 
I OM School 



5, Pink is my signature color." 

k Steel Magnolias 

B.Gi> 

C. Pretty Wm 



6. "I'm sorry that people are so jealous of me . 
hut I can't help It that I'm so popular." 

A. Jaw!" 
B Mean Girls 
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r-BAIl & GRILL 

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[ Mtni.-Fri, *> a.m.-5 p.m J 




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J Put the resume 
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Royal Thai Cuisine 

One of the best quality restaurants in town 



-*— Beautiful Decor and Friendly Service 

hh- Very peaceful & relaxing atmosphere 

Variety of Food with many choices of: 
^r^meat, seafood, tofu, and fresh veggies 
at affordable prices. 



Fast Service, All main dishes served with 

Jree tasty soup of the day and Crab 

Rangoon that everyone loves! 

Hours. fJ am- 1 Opm, 7 days a week 

3003 Anderson Ave. (in plaza west. byAko) 

539-0399 



7. "Who knows where thoughts come from? They just 
appear 

A. The Karate Kid 

B. finding Neverland 
C Empire Records 




8, "Mommy, mommy, the rhino's gt ttlng too close to 
the car." 

A. Tomm, Boy 

B. Anchorman 

C. The Cable Guy 



9. "Grab a brew, Don't cost nothin." 

A. Sorority Boys 

B. Animal House 

C The Breakfast Club 




The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Polite 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list 
wheel locks or minor traffic violations because ol space 
constraints 

Tuesday, Nov. 8 

■ Rhonda Sloan, 2500 Fatm Bureau Road, Apt 107, 
was arresied at 1:40 p.m lor driving with a suspended 
license Bond was set at $1,S0O 

■ Luke Slams, 730 Allen Road, Lot 163. was arrested at 
2:43 p.m. foi obstruction of legal process, driving with a 
suspended license, DUI and tailute n tpDHI Hund was 
set at $2,000. 

■ Myrtle Crawford, Junction City, was arrested at 4: 10 
p.m. for probation violation and failure to appear Bond 
was set at $10,000 

Wednesday, Nov. 9 

■ Alex Stulu, 1030 Fremont St., was arrested at 2:15 
a.m. foiDtll BondwassetatS7S0. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service Items In the lalendar can be published up to 
three times Items might not appear because of space 
constraints bul are guaranteed to appeal on the day of the 
activity To place an item in the Campus Calendat. stop by 
Kedae 1 16 and nil out a lotm or e mail the news editor 
at loliegioiwipubhi) cdu by 1 1 am two days before it 
li to run 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense ol thedoclotal dissertation of Paulette Watson at 
lOa.m today in Bluemont 3bX 

■ The Graduate School announces the hn.il oral 
defense ol the doctoral dissertation of Sherry Bowman 
Ktagh at 10: 50 a m today in Bluemont 139 



TO, "Come out to the coast, we'll get together, haw a 
few laughs..." 

A Payback 

B TheTetminatui 

C Die Hard 

Source — f¥m*Jmdb.com 



Answers: 

J Ol'a 6'V 83Y8 9'V STr'V TV ?'fl I 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appeal in this space If you 
see something that should be corrected, rail news Rata 
Knsten Rodericks 532 655601 e-m.n pub 

bufdu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas State Llntvetsiiy, is published hy 
Student Publications lot , Kedzie 103, Manhattan. KS 
66S06 The Collegian is published weekdays dunnq the 
school yeat and on Wednesdays dut mg the summer 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502. 
POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas Stale 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kedfir 103. Manhattan, KS 
66506 7167 
O Kansas Slate Cnllegtan, 200S 



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Thursday, Nov. 10,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Antique cars gaining popularity 



By Tessa French 

KANSAS Ml KOU I 

Sonu might say antique cars 
ireciated and collected by 
people of all ages, 

For Brandon i lagman, senior 

in mechanical Engineering, his 

ilveinent with remodeling 

vin«.-. originated within 

niilv 

"My father and l remodeled 

the entire car," Hagman said 

Mv mother and i did the brte* 

inn. I did a bl of odds and ends. 

put in .1 rchuili engine" 

Tnd.iv Hagl i.m mens B 1965 

< ohra Mustang, but he 

said lie eventually wants a 2005 

Mustang, which matches his cur- 

"Whi time for me to 

i cat it lost teemed natural 
he said. 
le Hagman lias his fam 
ilv in help rebuild can, fv 

man in animal sci 

kj he pre 

i- over others ol 

[Vii lliein when 

i I hen want 
id Bosch. 'That's what 
ned with I 

i li bought his car from a 
junkyard nearly four years ago 
"It's a l Nova, and I've been 
he >;iid 
thing on Bosch's 
something he restored 
In himself, excluding some i 
ainl 
,ii collectors, 

llu- ! 

■ i ttc 
othet K St ite students 
love old i 

the looks til 

nind and 

in- liorin 

nd. 

Bosch Robichaiu was 

ullecdng early 



in life. 

"My lamer Bfld I got started 
when I was 10 or II and Stan 
ed going to shows together," he 
said 

Together, they also houghi a 
1941 Ford Coupe, which thev 
restored Into a rtreel rod and 

eventually bought a \^9 Cobra 

let Mach i Mustang 

"Now we help put tli> 

shows on Roblcnatrjt said "It's 

,i hobby I want to do my whole 
life Vou meet a lot of cool poo 
pic and learn cool tilings ' 

RobtchauK is currently a 
member of KSU Motorsportl 
Club, a group for automotive 
and motorcycle enthusiasts to 
share their love foi CMS 

Automotive clubs are I great 
way to share a common interest 
in a hobby . said Terrencc |ones 
president oflocal Yard Arts Clas 
sics Car Club 

"it hjsl started us a p 

gel her for guys with old Cars," 
[uiies said The club consists ol 
about 15 members, ranging trom 

high IChooi and college Stud 

in area residents, ana as b club, 
they participate in nannies and 
shows They're also very in 
volved with giving to the com 
tnunity. 

"\v. ii havi car shows or have 

the cars on display in the mall 
to make and donate money to 
vinous organizations in town," 
|ones said 

Some of the groups Yard Aris 

Classics Car Club lias donated to 
include Sunset Zoological Park, 
l hut Hills Breadbasket and Big 

lakes Development <. enter 

"One of the unique 
about our club is that we 
many different types of t an 

[ones said "Some clubfl BW 

ally mustangs, bul we have 
street rods, antique cars, classit 
cars and must ; 

ety is part of the fun 

On every Friday from tpril 





RAMBLERS 



I \ vi v I luirsiKiy nij»lit is 
Sti>«ik Night 

liOH USI>A lop Sirloin 
with all ttu> tri mm ings 

Couples Dinner ) 

complete til into i v 

All Domestic 
Bottles 



I 




«h/ii I Hwy24 

1~ 




KSU Theatre & Dance and 
the Department of Music 

Present 



I 



the musical 



November 17-19 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



book by 

Roger O.Hirson 

Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public $13.50 



music and lyrics by 
Stephen Schwartz 



GodsP ella ° 



McCain Box Office 

532 6428 weekdays 

11:00 am to 6:00 p.m. 

www.ksu.edu/sctd 




Senior interviews 
for Marshall Scholarship 



Steven Dolt | 
Cleaning the side of his cat. Terry /ones, Manhattan resident, wipes 
down the body of his rebuilt 1958 Mercury Monterey. Some K State 
students rebuild vintage cars with their families. 



to October, the \ 

si. I ( 'V ol 

cruising 

Most peop club 

i 

gu, whert 
trailer the 
Through the latest retro-style 

use i 



i is bI the point in 
their life whet retiring, 

in.! have initial stability to buy 
. and p.i\ son 

people who i i driving 

their morn's old panel station 

ion 

v !<■ do that" 



— LOVE- 

Advertising* 

Work for the Spring 2006 Collegian ^^ 



Advertising Manager 

Applications due 5 p.m. Nov. I I 
Interviews will be conducted Nov. 15 



Advertising Staff Positions 

• Assistant Advertising Manager 

* Account Representatives 

Applications due 5 p.m. Nov. 16 



Pick op an application & job description 

in Kedzie 103 



I 




m 



?""«*, 



«'* 



*nd 



^»ttfea«. 




We're Looking 



For YOU! 




Spring 2006 
Editor in chief 

•Applications due 
Sp.m. Nov. 11 

•Interviews will be 
conducted Nov. IS 



Spring 2006 

* Managing Editors 

• News Editors 

• Desk Editors • Reporters 

•Copy Editors • Designers 

• Photojournalists 

•Graphic journalists 

•Graphic Artists 

•Online Journalists 

•Applications due 

5 p.m. Nov. 16 



Pick up applications in Kedtie 103 



/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



By Abby Brownback 

HANS! tGIAN 

ia ii ilderbach inter 

I .n! Scholar 

ship WediiCMl r. 
rlolderbach 
nunicalioiis, it 
in Chicago tot • I Mat 

shall • ' ipt distributed 

nationwide 
1 1 u 

I couldn't 
handle ' 

I 

nivei 
sitj in 

Mat ■ 

K Si ■ 

.on but lloldi 

io re- 

lloh 111 

|ii.; 

lu.l.lt 



Holdcrbuch applied for the 
campus nomination in spring 
2005 and wm interviewed by 
,i i BQipua committee She then 
i nmpteted the national appli 
cation in Oi tobci 

I fee) this opportunity 

i enhance my undo 
the types ol issues I'll be 
covering," she said 

Holderbach,whoisslud 
iilcn this setnestci has In 

i\ the Kansas t'il\ Star, 

ihc i<- ital |oumal and 

tlir Scripps I ioward t ounda 
ii.m she u [tor in chiel 

ol theCollcgii i tall 20W 

The Marshall is I" 
lot students wiib 8 stron 

sum) 
and .i strong sense ol how their 
goals "'ill be served in stud) 
injj m the i Initcd Kingduni and 
i ihink I'atrici bad ii 1 Ihose 
liohcnbarj said 

Scholarship will 

lay. li 
■ J l (nlderbach said sht 
todj wtliet develop 
studies ii the i 1 "' 
Oxford or comparative ethnic 
I he Queen s l i 
'• i 

larshall Scholarship 
Huhenbarji said 



©mo© am s Lifetime — Everyone's doins it. 

jngcjimenti o n d weddings i C 

" <edzie 103. To advertise, call 532-6560. 



Veteran's Day Celebration 

Salute t§ 

America 

November 11, 2005 



Sponsored by 

Flint Hills 

Veteran's Coalition 



7-9 a.m. Veteran's Day Breakfast 

& Territorial Flag Display 

a. m Veteran's Day Honor Parade 

Mall 

1 1 a.m. Commemorative Program 

6 p.m. American Legion 
Veteran's Day Binquel 









H \ 



* sim 



Thurs. November 10 

vs. Emporia State 

7pm 
Bramlage Coliseum 



All Tickets -$10 
K State Students - 
with valid student I.D. 



/ 'V»V«-/ J& B* / llTff' 



Campus Phone Books 



Buy A Book - on sale NOW in Kedzie 103 

WORTH ITS PRICE 8 am to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 



Mssssssasssssstsk^kA 



^^AAAl 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 10,2005 



To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and wllten after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Girard 
Matt Gorney 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoza 
Alex Peak 
Calrina Raws on 
Krlsten Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



TO THE POINT 

Attorney should 

represent party 

after switch 

Changing sides midstream is rarely a 
good idea. 

Regardless, Johnson County District 
Attorney Paul Morrison announced his 
decision to switch party affiliation from 
Republican to Demo- 
crat and challenge 
Plull Kline for his posi 
lion as state Attorney 
General 

Although many 
doubt the sincer 
ity of this change, if 
Morrison is ready to 
flip sides as a poten- 
tial election-winning 
tactic, he needs to be 
ready to represent his 
democratic constitu- 
ents' view and opin- 
ions. 

The United States is 
hased on the freedom to chose on just 
about everything. If a political candidate 
wants to choose to change his party af- 
filiation, he has the right to do so. 

Making such a change only to win an 
election is an exploitation of this free- 
dom 

In a time where a small percentage 
of people exercise their right to vote, 
and fewer take time to learn about the 
candidates, this type of political trickery 
only serves to stealthily steal the votes 
a! those who vote the party line. 

Morrison must back up his hop to the 
left by supporting democratic initiatives 
and showing his change is mure ilian a 
farce. 

Morrison is obviously looking at 
an uphill battle in his bid to convince 
die-hard democrats he has changed 
his ways, and it will be his actions that 
show constituents with which party his 
loyalties rest. 



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/^l A H S A S S t A T I 

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IDITMINCHIlf 



M»n Gorney 

COfUMKF 



Ann«tw l»wl»«l 
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ommnonn 



Oovt Shmn* 

WIITINUOKH 



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MtMUNGtOITDi; 



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photo tmro* 



Abby Srownback 



Anthony Man dot* 

CMStltUtliJH EDITOR 



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MWStDirM 



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The poverty of diversity 

Harmony, objective cultural truths not possible 




Truth, objectivity and knowledge arc under Bl 
tack at our university, by iliat fashionable dogma, 
"diversity" Posing as a beacon of moral 
neutrality, it is instead a creator of the 
morally neutered 

Diversity has a vague, cheery ring to 
it, attractive to idealistic students. Bui, if 
you examine diversity's premises, their 
poverty becomes evident 

Diversity's major presupposition is 
i hat "all cultures an ach culture 

has its own assumptions about real 
ity which cannot be measured against GRANT 

sumptions of another culture REICHERT 

Objective truth - truth applicable lo all — 

cultural - is an ethnocentric fiction 

We see this in the diversity's operation Due to 
the cultural subjectivity of knowledge, classmoms 
must have cultural representatives to convey dif- 
ferent cultural perspeL lius These reps must be 
admitted regardless ol merit merit being B false. 

ethnocentric appeal to objective truih. 

Due to the cultural relativity ol knowledge, 
these reps are needed even in the hard BOeru 

- physics hasnospcci.il claim to objective truth 
and benefits from other cultural perspectives. 

I have previously pointed out the incompahbil 
ilv of individualism with diversuv I focus on group 
identity If we are defined through involuntary 




group categorizations rather lhan through ads of 
lefinition, then individuality is a sham. 
Diversiphiles were unmoved Individu- 
ality is I western concept, ttiey said. It 
cannot be imposed, because all values are 
relative to their culture 
But. then, one loses not jusl individual- 
ity, but liberty, equality and even diversity 
itself Pot diversity also formed within 

i a culture, and, since it privik : 
culture over non-culture, also make 
claim to absolute truth - the truth of the 

primacy ol miture 

Therefore, diversity is internally contra 
diclory. To wit. it Mates I bete are no 
objective, cross -cultural truths - oh, 

.■! for diversity." 

Diversiphiles say diversity is necessary for 
intercullural dialogue. Bui B "individuality" is 
inadmissible into argument then anv value laden 
statement is also inadmissible 

Having denied (here is an objective truth to 
referee between competing beliefs all beliefs 
become equally valid, and theretiire dialogue be 

comes impossible. The claims "culture H beKi 
value d and "culture I believes value X 

is abominable" cannot be debated without sj | 
in some higher standard, some objective truth. 
Therefore, dh i not be harmony Since 

culm ral debai i able, the ooty way 

objective beliefs is as ilk- philosopher 



Karl Popper noted by the ■elimination (killing) o( 
the carrier of the subjective knowledge 

When argument is rendered ineffectual, the 
sword becomes the only means of persuasion 
Violence is the end state of diversity, as ail in- 

lingty restive Europe is realizing after years of 
unthinking muliiculiuralism. 

It's not the mere difference of viewpoints thai 

i, praiseworthy, bul the objective content of those 
views, when analyzed with universal reason 

Likewise, I he imperative in ilunk mitsidethc 
box" is bankrupt It's no. ,ny's prenu 

that WS n bound, as cognitive prisoners, lo our 
culture Since OUT culture contains our basic 

tractions aboul reality, thought outside of it 
!-- impossible, unless objective Iruih exists Tilts 
imperative, then, is trails, a plea tO accept, uncriti- 
cal I v the view b ei rig n ff ereci 

In The Abolition of Man. .i bonk that now 

seems prophetic, ' S Lewis tttai ked thi 
croachmeni of subjectivity into schooling. One 
dangerous aspect, he noted, is that a student "has 

'linn thai ell in s, theology, and politics are all 
at stake" when lliey, say, turn in a diversity reflet - 
iper 
I Sen foray into subjectivity insinuates certain 

principles into us and saps others out, 



Grant Relchetl h a |umoi in political sc lence. Pleats tend your cam 

m*nt s to opinion* ipu hiiu.f <f m. 





Molle|: 



Denver marijuana law won't hold up 



Stoners across the world were 
able to giggle happily last week 
as the mile- "high' city 
named one of the most 
liberal marijuana laws mir 
country has seen Well. 

I the most liberal law 
since President Reagan 
was a tittle boy and pot 
was legal. 

As of Nov 1, il is nn 
longer a criminal act m 
Denver for a 21 -year-old 2ACHARV T 

to be in possession of up ECKELS 

to one ounce of the once- 

taboo drug 

Similar laws in Amsterdam have 
allowed coffee shops to sell five 
grams of cannabis without being 




prosecuted and no legal action is 

taken lor possessing small quanii 
lies for personal U 
Sadly, Denver's recently 
passed citv ordinance Isn't 
being looked el as anything 

than a huge politi- 
cal statement Mayor John 
Hickenloopcr, who oppo 
the ordinance, said local 
police will continue to use 
the stale laws to prosecute 
nl lenders 

Once again big brnlher 
has to come in and take 
away what people have 
worked so hard to achieve. Wheth- 
er the man is on a power trip 
just uneducated about marijuana 
is uncertain It is only a plant, not 
something derived from a plant 
such as alcohol, cocaine or opium 




Marijuana also differs from the 

above drugs as it dues tiol product 
nearly the same health risks 

While il has been reported thai 
about 85.000 people die from con- 
suming alcohol annually, marijuana 
1 1. is . aused zero deal hysJ 

cally impossible to overdose i 
pot 

According to the ttutituu 
Medicine, an independent program, 
marijuana isn't even the gateway 
drug people fear it to be In fact, 
iherc are few people who ever turn 
to other drugs after smoking weed 

There is also the misconception 
that it is dangerous for people to 
he driving under the influence of 
thil plant Many tests have proven 
that while it may have a significant 
affect on psychomotor skills, the 
effect is neither severe nor long- 
lasting This situation is easily 
explained by proving mosl people 
under the influence of marijuana 
lend to drive slower and make up 
for slower reactions by being much 
more cautious 

The list of other arguments 
against the plant continue to get 
more and more outrageous. Claims 
that it will make someone kill or 
rape innocent victims are laugh- 
able. 

Marijuana doesn't deserve to 
be legalized jusl because it won't 
hurt society The truth is that it will 
actually end up doing good and 
helping our nation thrive. 

In a recent report by the Na- 
tional Organization for Ihe Reform 



larijuana Laws, oi NUKML, 

an estimuled S7.6 billion is annu- 
ally spenl lo enl I marijuana 

I tog that much v.c 
could also add lo a hide 

ecu) m my 1 star and watt 1 1 the 

schools get funded again 

Freeing all those prist an. i s of the 
war on drugs would also greatly 
relieve the stress nur enrrev lions! 
system has been leelingas of late 

if then reasons aren't pood 
enough for you, maybe you'd 
consider the fact that legalizing it 
would help eliminate a small 
tion of racism thai still exists in the 
United States. 

The recent NORML report also 
mentioned that while black adults 
only account for 1 1 9 percent of 
annual marijuanti users, they make 
up 23 percent of all marijuana 
session arrests in the United States 
All hough Ihis argument can be 
made on most crimes In America, it 
is blatantly obvious on this one, 

Until Hickenlooper and the rest 
nl the world understands lh< 
things, we will continue to oppress 
those who would benefit from its 
legalization, 

The only thing we can do now is 
follow Denver's example right here 
in Manhattan and announce to the 
world that nothing is wrong with 
marijuana 



Zachary T. Eckels, it a Junior In print journalism 
Pl«aw send your comments to 
Opinion u' ipub -k i u. tdu. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fourum Is the Collegian's 
anonymous call-in system The foumm is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 
and libelous comments. The comments are 
not the opinion of (he Collegian nor ate 
they endorsed by the editorial staff 

I have new put anything on the Fourum 
How hard is It to get on' 

Does anyone else feel like singing "The 
ants go marching or* by one, hurrah, 
hutrah* when walking up and down Calvin 
Half's stairway single file each day? 



Shane Sanders, quit malting excuses 
lot you being a sorry fan Less tickets sold 
equals less revenue equals worse facilities 
and coaches equals fewer recruits and 
wins. Go back to Lawrence 

I vets 1.0. sets banned That's one less 
guy burning the Chiefs' secondary 

Chuck Morris sold his soul to the devil for 
his rugged good looks and unparalleled 
martial arts ability Shortly after the trans- 
action was finalized. Chuck roundhouse 
kicked the devil in the fate and took his 



soul back The devil, who appreciates irony, 
couldn't stay mad and admitted he should 
have seen it coming. They now play poker 
every second Wednesday of the month, 

To the guy In the hug* truck who 

graciously decided to take two parking 
spaces instead of one — leam to park 
Next time I'll leave something else besides 
a nke note 

I Just had sex in one of those study rooms 
il Goodnow Hall. 



Th* period end to the perfect day, you 
broke my heart and you don't even know, 

To the guy that just yelled at us on the 
third floor In Hale — if you can have a spit 
cup, then we can talk. 

I would like kg announce that the band 
" The Spins" are absolutely the greatest 
band that Manhattan has seen In over a 
century 

The library's custodial help needs to 
dust the alcoves on the fourth floor. 



I was walking past someone who was on 
the phone, and they were saying, "man, 
I knew your back was hairy, but I didn't 
know it was that bad." 

My them tab partner sucks at titrations, 
but it's OK because I want lo get on him 

tjumby's Drivers. Keep rout cats off of 
the sidewalk 

Kudos to Childress on an excellent 

K State's inferno is the article st 
the year 



Don't you hate it when you bite Into a 
peanut butter cup and realize the 
wrapper is still on ? 

ladles, by the way, along with the 
bottom bunk, I've got a private bathroom, 
yeah girl 

Need more fourum? Go to 
www.kifatHalleglaa.tmH for the full 
version. 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Thursday, Nov. 1 0, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Dream significance, theories depend on individualexperiences 



By J, Scott Bowman 

MNSASSTAlttOUtGIAN 

l( wusunly a dream ni;hl ' 

i (reaming thai one h embams 
miyzhr im'Lin one hus hidden weaknesses 
,hhI fears li a person dreams of a pirate 
ii mijjhi mean someone In Kb or her life 

|oe Eisenbarth, sophomore in pre 
.. ilogj lid he rutin least 

ringdrt 

"l kmnv lhai everyone dreams," he 

Hiring dream I had 

when I was living with rnj tnothei 

were lucked out ni 

the hi 

lie said he n to whai 

iri-.iui meant but N could have 
meant something about his mother not 
beiitr nurturing si the lime 

l-'v< ;ii there jre count 

ka mi dream interpretation, there 
is in) real onsennu on what 

drean J Leon Fcappoport. pro 

. emeritus in psychol 
Historically, dreams a mely 

important to various cultures, mdudinn 
Romans and native kmericari cult 
is modern day, the empbasi 

dreams ie not as present, he said 

"It's been pushed back bjl the scien- 

tific ideolo iport said The sun* 

pie-minded view ol science is that if you 
can't measure it, weigh it or get a hold ut 
it, then it's not worth botharing about" 
Dreaming occurs when one is ksteep 



Dream Interpretations 

Atst: It siqmhes misfortune and bad luck, but for cat 

lovers it signifies an independent spirit. 

Castration: It signifies overwhelming fears the person lost their virility 

in lee lings of sexual pie 

A dog: It indicates a skill a person has ignored or forgotten but needs to 

be activated. 

School: It signifies feelings of inadequacy and childhood insecurities 

lhat have never been resolved 

Falling: To dream ot falling and not being (tightened, signifies the 

person will overcome adversities with ease If they are frightened 

indicates a lack of control Insecurity and/or lack of support In then 

waking life 

Being chased: To dream il are being chased signifies the person is 

avoiding a situation they do nut think is conquerable. 

Money: To see ot win money in l dream symboliies success and 

prosperity is wlthtn a person's reach. 

Source: www.dnommoodi.fom 



and experiences' what is i 

Eye Movement and il OCCUH For about 

50 minutes even 1 boui 01 ■ 

one sleeps, Rappuport said, who I 

i dream i taas al K-Stat I 
((>■ said everyone dreams, but in 
. people bm tiemberthem 

There are manydifteren 
on what dreams are, Rappopi I 

He said une vte\c is thai lb 

basically mental sialic- what \ 
in dreams 

thoughts with ii" si;;. 

(.aii Line is thiii dreai 

.lriii in some » 

There u uJ lucid 

dreaming, which Lncludi 
n\ to pru| 

own dream or solving pi 
i heir dreams," said R.i 

i ' at K Stale I 

told b ■■kins; 

mi a Ph.lJ thesis b 

rjuldnt solve some equati 
in him in a di 
nterestinj 
.-ills / i it until n 

rlc laid he was working on a pmb- 

the quality ot beauty and how yoi 
l ell if someone i attnctivi 

W us go by any single 

able, like then h 
Rappoport said 'And I oouldt 
problem 



' \in.l then in B dream it eiinie CO n« 

111 lllK'I.HtliiH It's 

linw the hair and the body and i ■ 

i lien i diit.-sn I . 
tell you how in 

I ht n sianifi 

i Hi 

I 
b oi l icpcrimi'tilaJ Drown He- 

■ utiel 

mess to the dream It is 

and repor tiaws 

• •ii I 
n.ii ! id the I won 

symb 

'None ol us re) about 

Ik faci that 
blow i nil ii," he 

"I in 

ould reaUj ■ 
id ii Bui one* ■ Wow 

Minn I 
know happen 

lie said 




Photo lltuitotlon by Steven Oolt l 



Fruit pizza offers variety with alternative ingredients 



By Ketly Schmitt 

KANSAS SlAUCOLltGlAN 

Anytime cookies are topped with fruit 
and cream cheese, lots of smiles are bound 
to be the end result 

Fruit pizza is built on a foundation of 
sugar cookie "crust" In (his recipe, the 
crust is topped with a cream cheese mix- 
ture and a variety of fruit To add variety to 
(his recipe, use cream cheese with straw- 
berry or orange flavoring. 

The fruit toppings can be switched out 
as well. Strawberries, mandarin oranges 
and a kiwi can be substituted with pineap- 
ple, mango and raspberries or bluehernes 
For the best results, make sure the fruit is 
well -drained before adding to the pizza 

For a sinfully delicious variation, use 
chocolate cream cheese Add chocolate 
chips to the fruit topping the pizza, and 
serve with a dollop of whipped cream 




Fruit pizza recipe 



I till ui pre packaged sugar cookie 

dough 

1 Bounce package of cream cheese 

VI cup of sugar 

upooii ni MftHi 
1 f* cup of chopped strawberries 
I chopped kiwi 

1 small can of mandarin oranges, 
drained 



Cut 1/4 inth thick dices of the 
cookie dough, overlapping slices 
slightly on a baking sheet to form an 
even oust hake the cook* dough 



at J7S degrees for 9to 12 minutes 
or until the crust is a light, golden 
brown. Cool completely 

Mix one package of cream 
chew with 1/1 cup of sugar and 
1/2 teaspoon ol vanilla. Blend until 
creamy smooth Spread over the 
cooled cookie crust 

Sprinkle the chopped strawber 
ties and kiwi on tap of the cream 
cheese Add the mandarin oranges, 
making sure (he oranges are drained 
wry well 

Slice with i pan cutter and 
setve. Refrigerate teflo 



Pages 

HOROSCOPES 



Aquaiiustian.21-Feb.18) 
Good day to du crossword puflles 
in the park, life 
•^ / is shod enough 
without letting il 
I get you all stresses 
like that 

Pisces (Feb 19 March JO) 

Vour marugoi 
wllbe.iuvi! 

ii n 
wh.it 1 1 

Aries (Match 21 April 19) 

You will wi 
< newspaper article 
abuulthflnir 
. Why rail 













laurus (April 20 

May 20) 

Gemini! May 2 1 June 20) 

Si day 

aniyliose 

Cancer (June 21 July 22) 

Leo (July 2 J Aug. 22 1 

te yuui 

l"IKV 
[illftllllj 

Highly 
" . ■ foubuy 

Virgo (Aug 21 Sept. 22) 
libra I Sept. 22 1 



Scorpio (Oct. li Nov 

Sagittarius !N uv. 22 Dec 21) 
Capricorn (Ott. 11 Jan. 20) 

Out 

Source; www.humoruopt.tom 



UPCOMING 
SHOWS 



Tonight 

Who: i : 

■ 

When 

Where: Aii |4|| 

Friday, Nov. 11 

Who: Pendi i-ad 

When: ID i 

Where: Auntie Mae's Parlor 614 H. 

Who: i ijrlin" 

Where. 18 I .1! W .uamie 

St 



Monday, Nov. 14 

Who: Macicmtw CD Relets- 

When: 9 

Where:'.' I Mora St 

Who: The Vuxe Harmon Hand Wl 
fast food Junkies 
When: 10 (,m, 18 1 
Where: I'Js Bai, 1 W Laramie St 

Wednesday, Nov. 16 

Who: Barefoot Rebellion with Shaking 
lice 

n:IOpm, I 
id's Bat, lmUtamieSt 








^WW»PP»WWWWW»W»W»*WWW 



Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



1 



Making STRIDES 



Wildcats face 

Emporia State 

in final exhibition 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS SUTKOIl [WAN 

The K-State nwn'8 basketball 
lean mil look to continue 
Improvement when 
i! lake* lh« floor tonight 
against Emporia Slate in 
its second exhibition ^.itm- o) the sea 
son 

Tonight's game a! Bramlage Coli- 
seum ii the final exhibition match for 
the Wildcats and will serve as the last 
tune n i 1 before the regular season be 
obis mi Nov L8 it will be important 
i in- the team to work towards correct- 
ing its errors against Emporia State 
before the regular season begins, 
i: |im UrooTdridge Mid 

\\ '■• need In play better.'" 

WooldnJ^t s.mi Time is crucial We 
need to see some improvement, so in 
thai sense (this game) is crucial 

We don't ^^__^___ 
wanl to gu |# c* * 
into the I a si R->Wie VS. 

week ot prep- Emporia state 

aration [or the , r 

regular sea When: 7 tonight 

son scratching Where: Bramlage 

our heads We ^ em „ 

want to feel Mc*: Adult $10, 

better about Youth » 
our team, and 

leel like we re moving ahead." 

There are a few areas of the game 
that his players have been focus- 
ing on since their 62-53 victory over 
the FA Sports All-Stars on Nov J, 
WooldridgV said 

"We've gol to do .i belter job of 
guarding the dribble," be said "They 
dribbled b rt and that created 

some open jump shots Obviously, 

Lurnoi oncern Wa tried to 

clean that up I think that's un 

ing p 

the largest concern fot 

headed into the 2005- 

2006 season of their great 

est strengths against the All-Stars. 

videnced by a 4W-28 rebounding 

margin in [licit Brsl BUM 

Tonight's game will mark the set 
ond straight season K-State has played 
a Division II, in-state opponent in an 
exhibition gaitl the Wild- 

cats posted an 88-69 victory over 

Pittsburg State University Emporia 
State should provide I ^>i>d test for 
the Wildcats, sop ho i no re iiimrd C'k'tit 

art said 

"Coach told as Emporia Stale will 

come m playing hard and playing to 
win." Stewart said It will definitely 
be good competition tor us, and we re 




CdtrinaRawtonl " 

K-State's sophomore guard, Clent Stewart, defends against EA Sports Alt-Stars' Roy Stigail Nov, i. The Wildcats face Emporia 
State at 7 tonight in Bramlage Coliseum 



looking forward to making rtridi 

Emporia Si cted to have 

good guard play this season, so the 
backcomi of K-State will be h;md«l 
ltd defensive test 

"They have some good shooters," 
junior forward Cartiet Martin said 
"They can shoot the ball well, so 

wen • light through 

sen, irilrsl isholsl .Hid then 

get back and recover on deft 



Although the regular season is still 
more than a week .iw.iv, both the 
players and coaches know the team is 
la i I mm where it want* to be, 

"It hasn't changed - we have 

o| work to do Uooldndge said 
identity of our team, how our team is 

lbs toughness 

ol OUI U'.tili the mil' identili 

ve apt all that in front 
ol us It's still a question mark 



The game Bgsintl latipoiia Slate 

tonight should help answi i 
questions and give the players a sense 
of where they stand early in th< 
son 

V\ 
Slew The first game 

■me things WO need to WOrl 
Hopelutly we will step up Dffcns 

nd defensively we'll 

step it up even un 



Kansas City's season salvaged 
at woeful Oakland's expense 



ft 




MARK 
POTTER 



There aren't many must- win games 
in the National Football League, espe 
cially in week nine 

Hut me Kansas 
City Chiefs, who . n 
tered last Sum), 
game against the 
Oakland Raiders with 
a record of 4-5 0-2 
AFC West), needed 
a win to remain se 
curely in playoff con- 
tention A loss would 
have dropped them 
into a last-place tu- 
rn a tough At-C \\ i 
Division and h 

all momentum heading into the second 
half of the season. 

And thanks to another Raiders' 
choke job, victors, is exactly what the 
Chiefs achieved. 

Historically, the Chiefs vs Raiders 
rivalry has been one of the N FL's best 

With Sunday's last second, come- 
from-bchind 27-23 win, the Chiefs own 
a five-game advantage (47-42-2} in the 
all-time series, dating back to 1960 

Tile rivalry has been more one sided 
recently, however The Chiefs are 25-8 
overall against the Raiders since 1990. 

The last time the Raiders defeated 
Kansas City was Dec. 28, 2002, which 
was also the last time the Chiefs were 
shut out, and ihe Raiders reached the 
postseason behind former Chiefs quar 
terback Rich Gannon. 

Since then, the Raiders have done 
in it hing but fold under pressure. 

The Chiefs have triumphed in the 
previous six ton tests, all by seven points 
or less 

Kansas City's last three victories 
against the Raiders at Arrowhead Sta- 
dium have come in overtime or the final 
25 seconds of regulation. 

Remember week 12 of 2003, when 
Oakland's Phillip Ruchanon committed 
an inopportune unsportsmanlike penalty 
(or ripping off his helmet with about 
four minutes remaining, after returning 



a 27 -yard-deep punt in Kansas Cit . 

Iln Raiders had to settle for a field 
goal 1o tie the game, and the Chit 
drove down the field on the ensuing 
ession, Chiefs quarterback 1i 
■it's fourth-down completion to 
wide receiver Marc Boerigter - who 

ing defended by Buchanon - set 
up a 2~> 21 cvifl mi a 41-yard field goal 
by 43-year-old veteran kicker Morten 

Or how about week 16 of 2004, 
when Oakland scored a field goal with 
1 :03 left lo lead 50 28? 

Dante Halls 44-yard kickull return 
with under a minute to go was Ihe dif- 
ference maker in I his game, setting up a 
Lawreiin lyrics game-winning 38-yard 
field goal with 22 seconds remaining 

Sunday was no different a typi 
Raiders meltdown 

Tin- Chiefs practically gifl-wrapped 
the game lo Oakland when they al- 
lowed Raiders quarterback Kerry Col- 
lins lo hook up with much maligned 
wide receiver Randy Moss for a go- 
ahead touchdown with l minute, 45 
seconds remaining. 

It was Moss' only catch of the day. 

The poised Chiefs, playing without 
former All- Pro comerhack Patrick Sur- 
\ll World running back Pries! Hoi 
mes and A! I- Universe offensive tackle 
Willie Rnaf, mounted another game 
winning drive, thanks to a 36-yard catch 
and run by backup running back Larry 
|ohnson 

With :j seconds left in regulation, 
Kansas City called a running play, and 
Johnson dove through a gap created by 
linemen Will Shields and Brian Waters 
and tight end (ason Dunn 

The Chiefs (5-3. 2-2) won the game 
27-23 and their playoff hopes are still 
alive, for which they should thank the 
woeful Raiders. 



Mart Pottet it * ttnior in public r*l at lorn. You can 
« mall him it spor hmpub.kiu.tdu 



Werner leads K-State 
to victory with 23 kills 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS 5 WtCOUlfilAN 

Whoever said everything is bigger 
in Texas might have been on ti> some 
thing, as the h olleyball team 

posted a big 5-1 (30 21, 25-50. M 

30-17) win against Texas Tech in Lub- 
bock, Tv\ 

This is a significant for the Wild- 
(17-8, 8-7 Big 12) because, not 
only is it the second victory in their 
is uiiliiigs hut it is only the sec- 
ond Big 12 Conference team the Cats 
have beat both at home and on Ihe 
road 

I thought we played really well 
in games one and four," coach Suzie 
Frits said 'I thought we played far 
belter in those two games than BTS 
have in the last two matches ' 

Lately, the Wildcats have also 
been troubled by some uncontrollable 
issues of! the court, so this victory 
should give her players some much 
needed reassurance, Fritz said 

I think il should give confidence 
that we could go on the road and win. 
especially since, historically, Lubbock 
hasn't been kind to us," Frit/ said. 

lunmr outside hitter Sandy Wer- 
ner stepped up again for K Stale, 
tallying 25 kills on 46 attempts for a 
370 hitting percentage, Sophomore 
outside hitler Rila Lillioni continued 
her recent offensive streak with 16 
kills, and junior middle blocker Joy 
Hamlin wasn't far behind with 10 
Sophomore setter Stacey Spiegelberg 
followed her normal pattern, dishing 
on! J2 assists 

It was quatily serving and (he out 
side hitters performance that kept 
K-Statc in the match, Fritz said 

"We served exceptionally well 
- probably Ihe single reason for our 
lUCCS * said. "Sandy and Run 

played great, and so did )oy and Me- 
gan (Krocker), for thai matter" 

Game two was the one black mark 



i 




Chrlttophar HanewiniM | fOlli&IAN 
Sandy Werner goes for a kill against 
Missouri's Lisa Boyd during the Wildcats' 
match at Ahearn Held House Oct. 26. 
The Wildcats played at Texas Tech 
Wednesday night and beat the Red 
Raiders, 3-1 (30-21, 25 30, 30-21. 30-17). 



on the night 

Both teams attempted 43 total 
kills, but the difference came in the 
hitting percentage, with the Red Raid 
ers (11-15, 4-11} finishing the game 
with a 279 percentage, compared to 
the Wildcats' 140 Texas Tech had 
five errors in game two, while K-State 
committed nine 

When asked what went wrong in 
game two, Fritz had no reply 

lood question," Frilz said in re- 
sponse It's frustrating we can put 
forth such a fabulous effort in one 
game and not the second. The in con 
sistency is something this team's go- 
ing to have to learn how to manage." 



Thursday, Nov. 10,2005 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

WBB | K-State inks Kincaid, ■ 
Sweat 

Two of the top sentr>r\ in the 
nation — awl in the state of Kdnsjs - 
— have signed theit National Letter of 
Intent to join Kansas State lor the 2006 
2007 women's basketball season, coarh 
Deb Patterson announced Wedii 

K Stale signed standouts Kir 
Kincaid from Andover Central High 
School and Ashley Sweat from 
McPherson High School in the fait early 
signing period Both played alongside 
current Wildcats Matties Gipson, loAnn 
Hamlin, Shalee Lehninq and Oar 
Janoiti on the Kansas Belles AAU sguad, 
which won the Under- 19 AAU National 
Championship this past summer In 
Orlando, Flat 

The Associated Press 




NFL | Holmes placed on 
injured reserve, out for season 

Kansas ( it y Chiefs run rw ■ 
Priest Holmes will mis', ihe rest of the 
season because uf the lingering i 
of a helmet to helmet hit 

Holmes, 3 J, a ttV 
Bowler, was injured flit 50 durifl. 
Chiefs' loss at San Diego, He w.r. placed 
on injured reserve Wednesday 

injuries have caused Holmes, thr 
Chiefs' career rushing le,! 1 
short two of his last three seasons Bui 
he has shown flashes of his old self 
while rushing tor ; I six 

touchdowns on IWi 





Palmeiro 



MLB | Palmeiro; B12 shot 
may have caused positive test 

Rafael Palmeiro gave his first 
public eirplanatinii (■ t hi! .tailed drug 
test Wednesday, on thee*. 
(ungressitm.il report on whether the 
former Balm .lugger lied 

under oalrt when he dewed 
steroids 

In a slate 
ment released 
by his lawyer. 
Palmeiro 
acknowledged 
several facts ot 

' that 
already had 
been reported, 
including that 
the dnabolic 

steroid stano/obl was found m Im 
system in May, and that he had raised 
the possibility th.n tUHn 

BU he look in April "rnighi have been 
the cause 

"I have never intentionally taken 
steroids," Palmeiro said in the state- 
ment. 



CBB|DukeNo,1inAP;Tar ■ 
Heels, Jayhawks left off 

Duke is hack at No. 1 in The 
Associated Press' preseason tollege 
basketball poll while defending 
champion North Carolina failed to even 
make the lop IS 

Kansas, the preseason No I last 
year and another regular in the poll, 
also was not among those teams 
ranked Monday 

The Blue Devils were a runaway 
choice for No. 1, the sixth lime Ihey 
have started the season atop the 
rankings. 

North Carolina becomes the first 
defending national champion not lobe 
in the pieseason poll the next season 
since Kansas In 1988-89 



BOX j Rahman: If not Vitali, 

bring on Wlad 

Heavyweight champion Vn.ili 
Klitschko stunned the boxing world ' 
Wednesday, 
announcing 
his retirement 
because of his 
recent knee 
injury. 

Klitschko. H 
suffered a right 
knee in|uiy while 
sparring last 
Thursday, just 
nine days before 

he was to make a long overdue manda 
tory defense agamst former champion 
Hasim Rahman. However, the injury 
forced Klitschko to postpone the match 
for the fourth time this ytAt because of 
various injuries 




Klitschko 









CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advert isemen n 



Thursday, Nov. 10, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






1 — *~ II I I ■ I - fill "■■■! || 

L 1 I' :: ■ ■ ' L" :: L 1 'J :s u ■ ■■ 

LET'S RENT 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apr 
i inturnished 



a LARGE one-bedroom. 
la January i dose 
ipui Washer/ dry** 
I lirview (786(317- 

rr\% 

NEW TWO-BEDROOM du- 
plex ClOM to campus Oil 
appliances tu mi shea No 
■ i i u rng no pets (786)539- 
."13-8298 

N6W TWO -BEDROOM 

norrt in 

lamt meets oil eo 

'twces inclua- 

' washer very nice 

615 Blucmom available 

(820 plus u mines. 
'/BSK-n 3 0462 leave mes- 
■-«K 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 

MEN I Close to campus 

i'<J Hash paid .Avail 

lobar 1SI (785)530- 

1976 or (786)313-8206 



ONE AND two bedroom 
apartrnenl Next Id i.arnpir-. 
Very nice Clean quiet Wa- 
ter/ trash paid Parking pro- 
vided No put (786)637 
7050. 

ONE- BEDROOMS $370 

$490 three-bod rooms 

$700- S825 (786)637-7701 

THREE-BEDROOMS 
AVAILABLE now CtOSB to 
campus Water/ trash paid 
Central air tea n operated 
laundry (766)6.' 
1786)03/ 2255 



FOUR BEDROOM TWO 
bath duplex One hall mle 
from campus Wn*er/aryet 
included Single property 
owner No pels No smok 
my 1410 Houston Number 
Two (7951778-0260. 

FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 

bath, two clocks irom cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer hook- 
ups Deck with gnu Quiet 
neighborhood, nice yard, 
nice house $1400/ monfi 
Available immediately Call 
(880)782-1933 or majoner- 
enialf* yahoo com 



1501 
BubiwbM 



Wanted 

ROOMMATF Nl 

January t tor two-Cedttxim 
house three MOCKS hem f<t) 
gievtlk' .' .impus 

■ ■ 

si .hi i <v. : ,i i i na ' 

1.1161860-6663 



needed Rent negotiable 
Please coniaci 1 785)556. 

0169 



: font- 
Houses 



A TWO-BEDROOM house 
Edge o( town Pals ox. 
$600 available now 

!"78o)3l i 

THREE BEDROOM 
blocks south Ot Ag- 
granite Spacious, washer/ 
dryer stove relngeratof 
central air (675 (786)537- 
9425 or {785)532-4424 



1451 

Roommate 
Wanted 

MALE ROOMMATE needed 
tor three bedroom house 
$200/ month next : 
pus warier/ dryer Avaiia 
We now (91 3)579-2209 

Roommates needed lor 
lour bedroom next 10 cam- 
pus. Two bath washer/ dry- 
er, dishwasher No pets 
1785)637-7060 



ROQMMATi S MALE or 
female pets okay Rani ne 
gotiable Washer/ aryt-r 
large vara one-tin W utilities 
CarUamea 



SPRING 

leasertsi needed 
dean apartment I 
campus and Ag 
Cheap bills No n 
Discounted rant S22V 
month Caa (485)2" i 

Avalacta Datambai 




0321 
Shout 



<S Alpha Hhi Alpha lor 'Ebo- 

*ny en* Duo 

■ 

~~ ANNIVERSARY to 

I WANt n: ijive a shout OUl 

DOTTE 



JUST WAfm.Il to say ton- 

at AI1B 

Come 

■«a An- 



KRfSTLE ME/ 

hope everything works cut 

to' you like you need it 

cause you deserve il Stay 

■MM 

LIZ HAS bad hygiene prob 
Isms and sucks at Die 

h " Kiit Vat 
know who yaii arc Darren 
Des Winy CJ Dennis, and 
Reese State ya gartgsta 

•- vou suc» at die 
aid have bad hygiene prob 
IMM 

NASTY NATE i raw the girt 

end /our lit** nr« vi ambles 
my man' 

aontali 

ONCE UPON there was 20 
srrurts copulating with ah 

tieast Bijumj of M 
<to watched' 



REUBIN D Las get this 
money I know you win Too 
many lad les" 

RUTH I love you with all I 
am 

RUTH, Will you ma 

SHOUT OUT to all the buck 
people On (.amp.. 

those people tnom the Done 

SHOUT OUT to dettl 00y7 

shout out to my hemaa 
Adrian Craig Anno, Big 
Done 
>iow it big then' 

SHOUT OUT to the beauo 

lui vivactou! 

women of BSC Biassed as. 

UBV is having their Harvest 
timet ■• 

SHOUT OUl to the 8SC 
Love you guys Shi: 
MX ' I 

SHOUT OUT to united 
Black Voices and God Bess 
your Fat) Harvest Concert 



Offl] 

M bullet in I 



1101 

For U 

Apt 




Announcements 

-tub has live air 



W'wv.i.'gtfeiii.tgnj 

.'.mhattans tavortle 
restaurant and bar webate 
Lola of tpecials entertain 
mant t a) • and gill eerlill 



mmm 



■<X)N 1019 
* S Three-bad 

H day room 
I back porch Kitch 

mm MM Ooaa 



r or Sale- 
Houses 

OUSE two Stones 
1 700 square tee* Large 
dock and screen ad porch 
sand beach, boat ramp 
great new' $130 600 



FEMAI 

three B 

spring semester P 

plus 

house {318)09O2( 




Lost and round 

Lost and found ada can be 
placed tree for Ihreo days 

0301 




We require a form ol pic- 
ture ID IKSU. driver's II- 
cense or other) when plac- 
ing a post a note 




MONTH Mi - : 
Twobedroom 108 
bedroom. M20 IMP, cm 
lege Ave t/65it>J/ -P096 

NICE TWO BEDROOM 
walking distance Irom cam 
pus Water and trash paid 
Lease Marts January lira or 
possibly sooner 1.786)672 

2317 

THREE AND tuutnedroom 
duplexes Walk to class No 
smoking no dunning, no 



I nr Pali! 

MoMb Homes 

1095 SKYLINE 14*52 wtl 
appliances $9000 or best 
otter (786)76.-. 
na 

."X.t ■ I Kill ' 1 " 

Three-bad room IW 
large deck, fenced M #267 
Flivercltase Reduced to 
sell Call (7851684 0904 01 
(786)586-8292 

i LOVERS two-bed 
loom mobile home Bam 
rraj close 

1786)537 9/18 



porch ajoraoa [tkii*^ tsrnate 

roommales I 

bills 



no dnnking no peti 
(7aS)5:i. 



university 

WMhari 

On* t»i 



1501 



*3«6; I 

I Cat 
dryer turniahed 
room open in 'wtt'edfotvTi 

'M48 

•\C.i1it V!i i ■ ! : Lease 
Irom January Augj 

adroom tw 
room n 
month Vki 
Manogn 

Jitte 

FFMAl t 

- 

it 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted Gieal apnilmiail in 

Htlo /<www v 1 1 1 a j a 

[ef!iaLi'„uni/ '-■ 
plus one -Ihirti 
water Wasr.<-r 

Li7' 785)456 49ft«i 



SHOUT OUT to fho Worri 
ens Basketball la 

pulling oft mat win 
moon 1 

-UW.FBODY Hi-. MINI: 

I II 

heme for the mental . 
cap"? 

SUPERMAN rOU ■ 

ttian locked my world 

you ve swept me of my leet 

THIS SHOUT QUI goes out 

to Whitney tor M 

J jrih tine 

and oomrnon sens* ana 

TO ALL re cm.'v naby rtia 
mas' 

A wanted to 

YORK YOU know that sjU 
« Ihey 



FEMALI 

wanted Tnfaa 
fTmalT - 

able inimerti.iiwy > 
J88 



ONE BID ONI Mil ' ■-- 


■INF BFDROOM •■ 

1 ' 

1 


h-oro 



smo' Twabedroom 

1 

pi 
Waaier ■ 



i > 




. 








Aggies ■ 








ipnr 1 MnMMM - 




■ 












I 

■ P V 
.lanuaiy 1 Maj) 31 $266/ 

heat/ M .'it walk 




310 



Mi tip Wanted 

The Collegian cannot von 
ty the financial potential ol 
advert 1 sements In tho Em 
ployment/Carper clesott) 
cation Ruoders are ad 
irlnd to apptoach any 
auch employment oppor- 
1 unity wtifi leasonabln 
caution The Collegian 
urges our readers 10 con- 
tact ihe Better Buaineaa 
eureau. 501 6E Jetforson 
Topeka. ks easor-neo 

(786)2320454 

Mnnrvittan City Oidlnaix;o 
46114 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment m any field of 
work or l.ibot lor which 
ha/ ana is properly quali- 
fied regardless ot n*e» 
. status, dlsa- 
•:. color, 
national origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
■ 





' 








■ 




■ 


144 





1 mic r>i 

MFN1 












GET PAID to drive a brand 

lunchroom/ play- 
ground Supervisor*. 







iwo-badn 




■ ■ 








. 
















...1.1. 






; 






. 




TWO OR three-bedroom 
dose lo campus Spacious, 
central air dishwasher 
laundry facility Water and 
trash pad (766)539-0886 

120 



Wanted 

FEMALI ROOMMATF 

wanted Three bedroom 
house $290 plus utilities 
Available Immediately 

|«13)880>7M| 

fEMAtt ROOMMATF 

wanted Thiea-oedtoom 
apartment half block ham 
campus 1260/ month plus 
one-mud utilities Call 

(786)342.1684 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
5360 one-hall utlta 
(786)341 -6193 



tarn class credit working with tin ,td design/production vt 

the Kdfttd* 

enrollment The instructor's permisik qutiitei 

try >lu() by 11'1 Kl ■'" 8 .t m 1 p m. 

application Application deadline is Friday. Nov 18. 




Advertising Design 



Kansas State Collegian 



ror RetTt- 
Apls rumustied 

Manhattan City Orolnance 
48 H assures every per- 
son equal opportunity In 
houalng without distinc- 
tion on account of race, 
sex. familial statue, milita- 
ry etatuB, dtsablllly reli- 
gion, age; color, notional 
origin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources at City Hall. 
(786)687 2440 

Apt 
UfKumia 

JANUARY 1 One-bad- 
$335. no pels 

.M7-0399 



;»nl- 
Housee 

AVAIlABLF NOW three- 
bed room, 90B Vattiei (780 
Oft street parlor*) (786)313 
2S79 

ONE BEDROOM WALK to 
dans No smoking, no drink- 
ing no pets (786)539 
1564 

THREE BEDROOM, ONE 
bath, house across Irom 
campus Modern appiian 
ces central air. very clean 
Available knmstKalHy 1360 
pat bad room plus u turtles 
1736 Anderson Can KSU 
Foundation at (786)532- 
756* CM (766,632-7641 

VERY SPACIOUS three 
bsd'Oom, two bath hall du 
ptex Immaculate condition 
All appliances Included 
Walk to Aggleville $829/ 
month I7S61588.2432 



^ H yOU are a graphc design majnr ini) would like ,vi 
Oft cim pus spring 2006 rnternstlip foi 
an application Your art departtnent .tdvtser's perrnisston 
1$ requi'i'd Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 18. 



Stop by 1 13 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. 
for more information. 



NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR MACTECHS 

Student Publications Inc at Kansas State University n accepting applk stiom tor ct 
part-time position for Macintosh technicians begirt (irtl inmafc of Janu 

2005 

The tech support team maintains about 50 Macintosh workstations, provi 
software support as well as performing general hardware maintenance 
Applicants should have experience with Mac OS X, OS X ind its server 

administration software Experience m any or al' ot th*. following is a plus 
Radmind, Shell scripting and general troubleshooting ability along with 
knowledge of MySQL PHP, and the Apache web server 

Pay starts at 17 50 pat hour with the opportunity to advance. Only students 
enrolling in soring semester 2006 for at least six hours at Kansas State 
University can be considered 

Applications are available in 113 or 115 Kediie or online at 
http://spub ksu edu/tech/application html 

Application deadline is 5 p m Friday, Nov 18, 2005 Please include your spring 
2006 class schedule. Return applications to 113 Kedzie. 



3101 



Help Wanted 

ROYAL PURPLE YEAR. 
BOOK T lor a 

marketing assistant to help 
iSeigri prommonal materia, 
assist wi*i yearbook sale* 



B 



■ 



I If V, ' 

. seeking a 
Man 



1 .. 1 • '>.. > ' 1 '•■' ■: 

re pne» 

•jree a 

■ 

! 
- 

330 ■sTJaaTasaHaai 
Opportunities 

1 login 1 1 cannot veri- 
ly the financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Cat set classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urge* 
our 'coders lo contact the 
Better Bust neat Bureau 
501 SE Jefferson, Tap***, 

KS 66607118O (786)232- 
0464 



410 I 



lining for Sale 



MEAT goats io< 
sale |7S6)38&4366 



WOMEN OF r ■ 

a saj>ua> 

Keychatn pappr" 
on sale hi- 
Call (7861341 o294 or anon 

Bitflia 



Pt5fT 

[ iransnortati on 



Motorc 



1»94 NiNJA oOO . 

1 1 hxj milat 

- 




630 



Sprfnq 
Break 



■11 t'RING Break Wet. 

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trip t'W 1 

w ww Spiing BieakDlo 

cgunia.--o"i 01 ww*LLei- 
BuraToura.com 

I 8202 



Sp4*: 




x$ 



with the 

Collegian 

Classifieds 




KANS I! 0H1£( iLVS 




suldoku 



l ill in (in grid bo that ever) row 
ever) column m<l everj 1 \ 3 box 

c'tnii.uiis the digits I ihroiiiili 9 
wnli do repeals 



5 1 



1 



4 
6 



8 4 
5 3 



1 



i 



8 



2 9 



Sol m ion and lips 
ai www.sudoku. com 



Bring in puzzle 

mid receive FRKK chips 

and small drink. 

I'ilti |)iu ill. im- "I Hltl --l/r Mili> 



Deadline* 

Chalvi i 
ptau . , 

532^555 



ClassiliuinATES 

1 DAY 



4C 

. 

I 
5 DA 

SO 



TO PUCf At. AD 

- 




HOW 











FALt. 




i 








C0 r 


























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"i'tHT 




Page8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 10,2005 



BUDDHISM I Meditation component in worship 



Continued from Pugv 1 

people call it ii.' is sverywbttt 

We believe vn already have 
it We jusi need to find it inside of 

K't-i" 

i ike other religions. Bud- 
dhism varies in practice Bud- 
dhism can be divided into three 
main branches' Hinayana Bud 
dliism, which means "lesser we- 
hide Mahayana Buddhism, 



which means "graalei vehicle . 

and Man I ray ana Buddhism. 
which originated in Tibet 

Its like the difference) be 
tWMn Protestantism, Catholicism 
and the Church of (Jetm Christ 
of) Latter-Day Saints, llauek 
said 'Calholidam could be con 
sidercd original, but we woukln'1 
Catholicism is the lesser 
Christianity" 

Buddhism is a belie! s 



Uiat can be practiced alone by 
personal meditation 

Anybody can meditate, and 
vnu ttonl need a leather, al- 
though a teacher is helpful - just 
a quiet place and some quiet 
tune." Hauck said, "And also 
people can do Buddhist medita- 
iion technique! and still practice 
whatever religion they practki 
We're not asking for worship, just 
an inward contemplation " 



ANCESTRY | Author related to George Washington 



SWITCH I Political affiliation can be changeable 



Continued, from Page I 

Africa Through marriage, 

Hanks discovered he Is distantly 

linked to George Washington 
and Tbni Hanks 

Hanks has been on an "Ances- 
tral Footsteps lmir in which lie 

visited several cities that his an- 
cestors passed through 

Some of these titles include 
Oakland. Calil knowille.Teiin., 
and Richmond, Va His last stop 

tanhattan. 

Diane Dollar, Manhattan resi 



dent, was a classmate of Murt 

Hanks, whose death triggered 
Stephen Hanks 1 research. 
"I enjoyed this thoroughly," she 

said "If I had more time. I would 
be chasing around the country 
to see where mv u ime 

from loo" 

Drew Gaschler, sophomore 

in business administration pre- 
professional, said he found the 
present. itio Iriguing including 

ral audience links 

I think it was most interest- 
ing when the audience said they 



knew some of his relatives," 

Cashier said 

lames Butler, Manhattan resi- 
dent said he attended the presen- 
tation with interest. Like many 
Other people in the audience, he 
had a connection tO the Hanks 
tradition 

"I was married to Murt's sis- 
ter." liutler said "1 thought the 
presentation was very good Its 

id to know where you came 

ii to know where you're go- 
ing I thought it was enlightening 
ir about the family" 



Continued from Page 1 

the candidate with the 2006 
State Attorney General cam- 
paign. Morrison said 

"I do so because I am most 
comfortable running as a Dem- 
ocrat," Morrison said, "Because 
I sense their strong commit- 
ment to safety, security and the 
rule of law But whether you 
are a Democrat, a Republican 
or a proud Independent, you 
have my assurances: You're a 
Kansan in my eyes " 

Switching political parties is 
not uncommon, at least when 
it boils down to heavily Demo- 
crat- or Republican centered 
States, said Joseph Aislmp. as 
social e professor and head of 
the Department of Political 
Science, 

"In the South, for example, 
it was pretty common that 



more conservative Democrats 
would change their party and 
run as Republicans Thai's 
what you're seeing happening 
here," Aistrup said "There are 
a number of people who arc 
not particularly enamored in 
the way Kline has ran his office 
- those aren't just Democrats 
hut moderate Republicans are 
the same way." 

In 2002, Gov Kathleen Se- 
belius and Ll. Gov John Moore 
earned 55 percent of the pop 
ular vote, with Moore who 
changed his political party to 
run with Sebelius in the elec- 
t i* hi 

With the Kansas Reptibl 
domination, the Democratic 

parly has to lake more opportu- 
nities to work with, not against 
the Republican party. Aistrup 
said By next year, he said the 
strength ol the Sehelius-Moore 



is imperative lo the success of 
Morrison's campaign 

"For him, he's counting on 
the Kansas voting public to re- 
tract from Phill Kline," Aistrup 
said. "Not that rotors will be 
attracted to him, or unattracted 
to him lies just trying to take 
advantage ol that on the other 

ticket" 

Other area residents, how- 
ever, say Morrison's affiliation 
is weak in terms of his political 
representation 

"If he were such a strong 
candidate, then he shouldn't 
have to c fiange his political 
party just for the chance of 
winning." said Matthew Vin- 
cent, Manhattan resident who 
said he considers himself to 
be Independent "But now. t 
am just going to focus on what 
Kline and M unison have lo of- 
fer - that's all that I can do 



The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 



FRANCE | International students 
feel effects of rioting, social unrest 



Continued from Page t 

Much of Isi.iin does not in- 
tegrate It tends to isolate itself 
Herspring si id 

tie speculated that a policy 
shift toward a more an 1 1 immigra- 
tion mid pose problems 
for the integration plans of the 
European Union, an onanixs 
tion which France helped tmind 

lor some French ctuZens at 
tending K-State, Ihe comph 
hi the problem is nothing rum 

Angelique Courbou. Spanish 
instructor and coordinator, is a 
i> citizen. 

The problem has been here 
for a long lime We've always 
been saying it was going to gu up 
at some poinl," Courbou said "I 
never expected that i( would ^o 
up to that extent 

Although Courbou's home- 
town of Chalons -en -Cham- 
Bgns has been spared from ihe 
violence, she has family in Nice, 



where the British Broadcasting 
Corporation reports said t fie re 
have been violent attacks. 

"Right now they have curfew I 
hope it's going to help," Courbou 
said. "I'm not sure it will Hon 
estly, I don't know what they can 
do I know they need lo do some- 
thing but I don't know what" 

Claire Nodot, a graduate stu- 
dent from the French city of Or- 
leans, said she has had to deal 
with the recent violent t as well 

"They arc very confused be- 
tween theh French identities and 
what they think is their home- 
land," said Nodot, who taugl" 
F.nglish in some of the suburbs 
now affected by the riots 

As the violence subsides, both 
Nodot and Courbou said they 
agree that long-term solutions 
are needed 

"Sometimes social chaos can 
bring dialogue," Nodot said It 
might be a way to find a solu- 
tion" 




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Indian Student Association Presents 
UTSAV 2005 

'The India Nn 

O* 5Wrtn»el«y, Novrmt'i 

• .ill) 

-4itiU. Cow«rt ff^Ojuvi (AIL faiOis ChOftfL) 

nlimtf tkke b WlM K* S.-M 
At K-Mal* Slti.irnt Union (In front ttfmd WHrt) 

jr mini tsJf.i 

Date Nov. 1 ml. 
Time I tij<> a.m.- 1 :.W p.m. 
CMnnrr Tutrix Mrmltrn i-*, Njin-Mtmrw 





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f»y*r dMIgwd *>* S*a#«* PtMpnfi £ P cm* Un r iMi 






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/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



r ( 



wwwkstJiccullegian com 



Friday, November 1 1,2005 



INSIDE 

Shoe styles 
change with 
the season 



Sub Exp D.r- 
Kans a 

tion 

Topek.i K3 




Al-Qaeda's hotel bombings draw protest, criticism 



By Christim Minion 

KANSAS STATE CQIUGIAN 

Three suicide bombings in Jordan's 
capital city Wednesday have strength- 
ened its citizens' resolve to fight ter- 
rorism and drawn the condemnation 
of nations across the globe 

Terrorists attacked three western 
hotels in downtown Amman early 
Wednesday morning 

Suicide bombers detonated ex- 
plosive devices at the Grand Hyatt, 
Kadtsson and Days Inn hotels, killing 
at least 56 people and injuring noit 
than 100, 



According to the Associated Press 
Islamist militant Abu Musah .tl /,n 
qawi's terrorist organization al Qaeda 
claimed responsibility foi the bomb- 
ings in a Web site posting Thtir 
sparking a protest of hundred* oi cm 
zens in Amman 

"Al-Qaeda was probably toping 
these attacks would encourage lordans 
citizens to oppose their government's 
housing of western citizens and tour- 
ists," said Stephen Long, Instructor of 
politics] science "But it has actually 
had the opposite effect, Jordanian eili- 
/ens are in tlie streets demonstrating 
against the attacks and al-Qaeu B 



.eminent offices, schools and 
oilier bus! ed Thurs- 

day in Jordan as citizens mourned the 
t li Inns of th« attacks, and govern i 
officials planned their next COUI 

action 

in ,1 televised address, Jordan's King 

Abdullah II fbn al- Hussein promised 
citizens the terrorists responsible for 
the attacks would not go unpunished 

We pledge to everyone 
will track down the criminal! 
those who stand behind the 
em wherever they are 
them out of ttieir holes and bring them 
he said 



Preside tit Bush also condemned 
the attacks thursday during a white 

House meeting with President Ah 
Abdullah Saleh of Yemen 

The killings should remind all of 
us thai there is an enemy In this world 

■ willing to kill innocent people, 
willing to bomb a wedding celebration 

iii order to advance their cause ," he 
fold the Associated PrstM 

Al-Qaeda I internet posimg said 
I he suiode bombing attacks were car- 
ried out in the name of Islam, a claim 
which Fbrabim Merit, graduate stu- 
dent in economics and a niemb 

tfusiirn Student Association, 



UJ untrue and upsetting 

■ these men have no hearts, no 
families, no feelings" lie said "Thej 
are killing innocent people - it's a 
..rune against human it \ 

Mena said the only way world no- 
tions can successfully combat terror 
Ian is to w'ork together to find a Com 
mon solution 

"Even before Sept 11, terroi 
. problem," he said "The U 

ists snii have money and they still 

have eqiiipmeni 

All counlrt' |us< Muslim 

countries must unit ip these al- 



Student parents 

K-State seniors balance school, work, 
wedding plans, time with 3-month-old son 





By Leann Sullen 
KAHSmiATUOUfGIAN 

Monday and Thurs 
day nights are 
Bruce Boos and 
Jackie Vondem- 
kamp's favorite nights of the 
week 

Thai's because they get to 

Spend linic together as a (am- 
\ with their i -month old son 
Ethan 

Boos, senior in marketing, 
and Vondemkamp, senior in 
mass communications, are full- 
tune students working toward 
graduation in May 2006 They 
also are planning their wedding 
for May - the weekend hefore 
graduation 

"Mondays and Thursdays 
we try to cook a meal and eat 
as | tainilv," Boos said. "Thai is 
pretty important to 

On days they don't have time 
together, Boos said balancing 
schedules can be a challenge 

"We do really well communi- 
cating and arranging our sched 
ules differently," he said "The 
hardest thing of all of this is not 



getting down on each other and 
nut fighting with each othej 

because we are al> SSsd 

OUt" 

Boos said sometimes it is 
difficult 1/0 lit in time for do- 
ing homework oi studying tot a 
test 

"A lot of tunes it we have 
group meetings oi something) 

I ask everyone in come to mj 

place or wt will tTJ to do it on 
Monday or Thursday," he said 

THE COST OF A BABY 

Boos and Vundemkainp re 
ceive women, infants and chil- 
dren vouchers lor formula, eggs, 
milk, juice, beans ,m J cheese 

"It helps out with the gm 
ceries and keeps Jackie healthy 
when she breast leeds," Boos 
said, 

Most of Ethan's toys, clothes 
and furniture are gifts from fam- 
ily and friends, Vondemkamp 
said 

"They have been really gen- 
erous and we couldn't Save 
done it without them," she said 

St* FAMILY Pa9« U 




Above: Jackie 
Vondemkamp, 
senior to mass com- 
munications, and 
Bruce Boos, senior 
in marketing, try to 
get their son Ethan, 3 
months, to smile. The 
family enjoyed time 
together on one of 
the tew nights they 
were all home. 

Left: Bruce Boos, 
senior in marketing, 
plays games like 
party- cake and peek 
a boo to entertain his 
son Ethan, I months 
Ethan's nursery 
was decorated with 
Winnie-the-Pooh 
products. 

Photos by Jo sly n 

Brown 

toi i [GUN 



New program 

could reduce 

security delays 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS SIM i 

Wit') t! I \ lor those Who are tiled ol 
airport set i 
gel shi 

l he Transportation Security Admin. 
tion plans to establish a Registered Ira 

■ mi available naiiot June 200t>, 

TSA director Kip Hawlev said m recent teste 
monj to Congress 

•Jte ■ 'iti testiit] am m 

i airports, Hwieji said Regi 

ler will allow pro- 
pat down lecurity checks it they pSJ an e> 

timated $i<i) tee cleat s und check 

and provide biomclrn tion like 

a Fingerprint and ins ican foi [ i 

Hawlej said like 

other 
go thi 

•Wei 

scree: 

ie* SfCURITY Paf 



Cheerleader 
competes 
for $2,000 



By Abby Brownback 
KANSAS StMltOl i 

A K State cheerleadct is vying (OI VOtSSJ m 

nJinc sptril contest 
Killi Lau sophomore in pre •professional 
secondary education, is in second place in 
Hound 4 ni tli! .isung Sideline Spirit 

si .in online competition between rep- 
resentatives Irom si\ ol the nation's Division 
i athletic confeien 
From Nov b until N 
in polls will he open to 
vote loi Lair or one of her 
five ci impel itors People 
rt)te one time per d I 

a i Enlow, checrli 
h, said Athlon S| 

contacted I he universilv l>« 
arrange (or a K- Slate wom- 
an In represent till Big 1? 
in the fourth round Ol 

teat 

He said Athlon S| ed each caodi 

date to submit photographs to be put on its 

Web site. The public (hen has three weeks |Q 
vote for its favorite n >tive 

• I did it thinking, 'What is thereto lot 
l ail said 

The winner of each ol tour preliminary 
rounds moves on to the final round I 
include $2,000 and a photo shoot to be pul 
in Athlon Sports' 200b Football Annual 

Enlow said about seven women from the 
cheerleading squad submitted photographs 

$et(ONU$Tf>]9«12 




Lair 

LlAMS 



Today 






High 76 
Low 56 



Saturday 



* 



High 75 
Low 42 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Cameras in court 

Supreme Court justices said Thursday 
that troubling memories of J. 
Simpson's televised murder trial a 
decade ago hang over the present 
day debate about cameras in court, 
including the highest court. Although 
Supreme Court |ustices haw opposed 
courtroom cameras, Congress wants to 
open proceedings to cameras 



Iraq bombings 

Forty-two people were killed by 
bombs Thursday at a Baghdad restau 
rant. A suicide bomber blew himself 
up in a restaurant about 9:45 a.m. in 
the deadliest bombing since Sept. 19 
Police Maj. Fatah al-Mohammedawi 
said 35 officers and civilians died and 
25 were wounded in this bombing. 



Oil vote on hold 

House leaders put off plans Thursday 
1 1 i\ i ite on the budget - cutting pack- 
age on oil drilling in Alaska because of 
opposition to issues unrelated to the 
Alaska refuge, deep cuts in Medicaid, 
food stamps and student loans 
Geologists believe 10 4 billion barrels 
of oil are in the Artie National Wildlife 
Refuge 



DON'T FORGET 



Students with 16 or more 
oedh hours are eligible to 

enroll today. 

The rowing Sunflower 
Showdown begins at S 
am. Saturday at Turtle Creek 
Reservoir. 



A self- defense class will 
be from 2 30 to 4:30 p.m. 
Saturday in the K Sand 
U Ballrooms in the K- State 
Student Union. 



R 



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^ * A A *. A. ^ 



i^^^^^ 



wmmmmmmmmmmm 



wmm 



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^^^w^m ■ ■ ■ • 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 11,298? 




1122 Laramie 



Bring this ad in for a 
sample 
when tanning! 

5393742 



BEST BETS 

Your guide to the weekend's entertainment 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Twa 

9 Perfor- 
mance 

13 Comediai 

14 Born 

15 Ari|. 

1611':. 

be golden 
18 Norman 

B.il, 

alter 

20 QflSlroy 

NS 
23 Ready to 

ten. 

25 Facility 
27 V. k 
forerunner 

29i ' .1 ■ it 

chemical 
31 CJir 
carol 

icr lo a 
pun 

37 Laugh a 
minute 
type 

38 Extern 
pen 



41 Ra/a 

parti i-T 

43 Panthoon 
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44 Boxer 
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47 Hi.r l 
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49 1. ■« 
52 Writer 
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53 rh 

inlo the 

54 Ann 

iMn 

55 Screw up 

v nnr 
DOWN 



time 

3C.it 
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4 Rb planes 

5 Mas an 

cravinn 

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nisll 

money 

7 Eastern 

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e Com 

9 Cancel 

pal 
17 It ii 

out 

19 Con 
tion 



30 



33 



33 



34 



36 



38 



31 



Solution time: 25 mins. 40 




Yesterday's answer ii 



i nerg) 

Go. 

Rotriatta 

tha's 

Iran sport 

.. apt) ■ 

lop per 
Gula 
glimpse 
of 
I aoaa> 

sivoly 

abbr 
Rub 

wrong 
way 

marital 
taction 
Less 

had 

faction 

potis 

Linger 
Pop 

1 

lured 
Up to 

Wool 
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1 1 Rock Shows 

Penderga^t and Sleepyhead will be performing at tO 
tonight U Auntie Mae's Parlor Covet charge is 55 for ages 
1 1 and over Emma s Mine with Lojic and Darlm at Sea will 
perform at Pi's Bar for Emma's Mine com par;! di%t release 
at 10 p m. Cover charge Is 5 3 for ages 1 8 to 2 1 and 55 for 2 1 
and over. Call Auntie Mae's at 539-8508 ot PJ.'s at 539-7055 
fot more information 





2 1 Military Appreciation Day 

Admission is free for everyone from 9: Ma m. to 4:30 p.m. today 
at the Sunset Zoological Park in honor of our armed forces, and 
all they do for our country Call 587-2737 (or more Information 
aboui the event. 



3 1 After Hours 

Grocery Bingo is from 7 to 11 tonight in the K- State 
Student Unkm Courtyard. Students can play bingo for 
a chance to win groceries and latger prizes, such as a 
portable DVD player, microwave and refrigerator. Free 
chili dogs will be served at Union Station al 9.30 p.m, 
Call the Union Progtam Council at 532-6571 ot e-mail 
i\up($ksu.edu. 




II II ( K\)M»V>t li- 
st t i, B I liKDDHIHS Y B \ I 
1 I II U II I I H i.) II It I || I 
r II K PPG QKS vttirs OBI 

\ II M I i l tl i \i i II Hi si i n 

Yfol«rilut\ OtptiKiuip: WHEN k CARTO 
GIVES \ill\H UTl \< ssVi TOO MANY DETAILS 
ONE MH. Ml c SI 1 II OVERDRAWN 
i I rspimjDifi ( 'In.' - ■ 




4 1 Protect Yourself 

Avoid becoming ihe victim of a violent dime by learning easy 
and effective self defense techniques The event takes place from 
2 30 to 4:30 p.m Saturday in the K, S and U Ballrooms, 2nd floor 
of the K State Union. Suggested donation to The Ali Kemp Educa 
tional Foundation Space is limited, so e-mail Jmonnoff-msurrfu 
lo reserve a spot It is for women only please Call 532 6571 or 
email at upna'itsuedu. 



S I Singin' in the Rain 

The 1952 classic love story, "Singin' in the Rain," is playing 
all weekend in the Union Little Theatre Show limes are 
8 tonight, 7 and 9:30 p m Saturday and 8 p.m Sunday. 
Cost is 51 and runtime is 103 minutes Call 532-6571 or 
e-mail at upc(o'tsu.«fu 



itiTftCRAiH 




' 






1 1 r 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports, die taken directly from RHey County Police 
Department's dally togs. The Collegian does not list 
wheel locks or minor traffic violations because of space 
constraints. 

Wednesday, Nov. 9 

■ Chad lemon, 3000 Tuttle Cteek Blvd., Lot 199, was 
arrested at t;44 p.m for probation violation, Bond wis 
set at 51,500. 

■ Thomas Oldfather, 1121 CTaflin Road, was arrested 
at 5:12 p.m. for unlawful possession of drugs and 
paraphernalia 

■ Qshwane Pryor. 2046 Collegeview Road, was » I 

at 6 p.m. lor unlawful possession of drugs and pa raphe r- 
nalia. Bond was set at $500. 

■ tashawn Spillet, 509 S. 15th St., was arrested at 6 
p.m. for unlawful possession of drugs and paraphema 
ha. Bond was set at $2,500, 

■ Jeffrey Currie, 2306 Willow Lane, was arrested at! 
p.m for failure to appear and probation violation. Bond 
was Wl at $4,250 

■ Anthony Moss, 3000 Tuttle Creek Blvd., Lot 521, was 
arrested at 1 1 p.m for battery. Bond was set at $500, 

Thursday, Nov. 10 

■ Michael Davis, 1015 Humboldt Si., was arrested at 
1:55 a.m. for DUI Bond was set at $1,500 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service Items in the calendar can be published up to three 
times Items might not appear because of space con I 
but are guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity To 
place an item in the Campus Calendar, stopbyKedzie l loand 
fill out a form ot e-mail the news editor at (aitcgion(Mpul> 
hu.edu by 1 1 am two days before it is to run, 

■ A library basics for science and technology class 

will be fro ml. 30 to 2: 30 p.m today at Hale Library I 
lion desk. 

■ An effective web searching class will be from 9 .30, to 
10 15 am today m Hale 408 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Kristin Simons at 10 
a.m. today in Throckmorton 40 3 1 



Corrections and clarifications 

The Madonna CO Release parly is for all ages at SOS Musk , 
1714 ( Mow St., instead of 21 and over, as was stated In 

Thursday's Collegian The address for Auntie Mae's Parti* is 
6 1 6 N 1 2th St, The Collegian regrets the errors 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas State University, is published Jy 
Student Publications Inc., Kediie 103, Manhattan 
66506. The Collegian is published weekdays dunnjjbe 
school year and on Wednesdays during the summe 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 j 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas Staj 
Collegian, circulation desk, Ked/ie 103, Manhattan 
66S06-N67 
" Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



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■ 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Tithes support ministries, underprivileged 



By Abby Brownback 

KANSAS MATE (OltE&IAN 

Sonic students don't keep .ill 
they earn, but instead donate 
a portion of it - a tithe - to 
churches or ministries 

A tithe ts";j inili part of one's 
annual income contributed vol- 
untarily or due as a tax, especial- 
ly for the support of the clergy or 
church," according to The Ameri 
can Heritage College Dictionary 

Ali Brown, senior in English 
education, said she tithes through 
Compassion International. Willi 
$28 a month, she supports 5 
year-old Vcsenia Fernandez by 
providing funds fur food and 



education. 

"I've been blessed," she said 
"My money and m\ stuff I want 
to use for God because it's his 
stuff" 

The Bible mandates tithing in 
the Old Testament, but the com- 
mandment is superseded by Jesus' 
fulfillment of the law in the Neu 
Testament, said Steve Ratlin" 
nior pastor at Faith Evangelical 
Free Church 

'We encourage people to tithe, 
but it's not like a law." he said 

Modern-day tithes are used to 
support (he church, just as tithes 
in biblical days supported the 
priests 

Budgets al hnlh ITK and 



Grace Baptist Church are 
ered by offerings 

Weekly offerings oJ between 
$8,000 and $18,000 sustain the 
$500,000 annual budget at Grace 
Baptist, April Ruckus. Grace 
Baptist financial secretary, said 

"Our budget is covered by the 
giving," she said 

Ratlin* said weeJdj offerings 
at FEFC average $M,IH)0. which 
now covers expenses hut nut the 
entire budcei 

Neither eh lire h pushes 
strongly for tithes Katlifl said he 
preaches on tithing when it falls 
within a book <>n the Bible on 
which he i*, preaching or within 
a series 



By Megan Green 

KANSAS STAR OOIU&IAN 

Four-hundred pau> "I shoes 
in the shape of the number 400 
represented the 400 people 
who die annually from second- 
hand smoke 

In BotCO Student Plaza on 
Thursday, Students for Clean 
Air Manhattan set up the dis- 
play in support of the Clean Air 
Manhattan Campaign 

SCAM is campaigning with 
I \M lor smoke-free workplac- 
es in Manhattan 

'Next week, organizations 
will go tn the Manhattan City 
Commission to get smoke-free 
places all over," said Briena In 
gel ken, junior in marketing and 
vent coordinator. 
The group had sign-up 

Btl naXl to the shoe display 
to support smoke -free places 
foi students and Manhattan 

lents 
People were encouraged to 
sign and support the idea of 
smoke-free Manhattan work- 
places 

The sheets were not peti 
hons, but will give the City 
■•mission a belter idea of 
how many people support 
smoke-free workplaces. 

"I want to be able to go out 
and not have smoke in my 

ami not have to wasl> 
clothes after going to the bars 



For more information 

For more information on the campaign, 
visit SCAM'sWeb site, wwwdeanairman 
hmtiin.org, 

because of smoke," Engclken 
said "It's also a public health 
issue" 

She said, according to the 
America n Legacy Foundation 
tobacco kills more Americans 
than AIDS, drugs, homicides 
fires and auto accidents com- 
bined 

About 10 Kan sans die per 
day from secondhand smoke, 
she said 

"We've had so much sup- 
port," Engelken said, "more 
support than not - lots of stu- 
dents, Riley County and Man- 
hattan residents. 

A majority of Manhattan 
residents are nun smok. 

Tale Beta, fifth year in archi 
tectum I engineering, said the 
display presented its tne&sage 
well 

"I am not a smoker, bul over 

all I see the projet i aaa poaHive 
thing,'' he taid 

t alhy Harmes. director of 
human resources at city hall, 
Raid no Manhattan ordinance 
prohibits smoking in restau- 
rant 

Individual businesses make 
the dedal 

Manhattan i only smoking 
policy prohibits smoking in city 



"I want to be able 

to go out and 

not have smoke 

in my face and 

not have to wash 

my clothes after 

going to the 

bars because of 

smoke. It's also 

a public health 

issue." 



Briena Enqi lken 
JUNIOR IN MARKHIM 

buildings and vein. 

If the ordinance SCAM sup- 
ports is passed, bit Will 
no longer have a sav in whet tier 
people can smoke in the work' 
places. 

Smoker Steven /tier, H 
ate student in regional and 
community planning said the 

campaign was a good idea 

He said he 1 . , duces 

where lli bothers hi 

"I ii' smoke around 

people," he said its 

a concern among people It's a 
good idea lor Manhattan i 
who l 



• rj love kei 
pfXMCh to giving and we ve been 
discussing if (1 l he molv 

empl lit said 

Giving is a part ol the Chris 
tian life, K.nliit said, along with 

praying, worshipping and i 
ing the Bible 

Ratlifl taid rfnee a lot of col 
lege students receive funds from 

thou parent! anil don't earn 

own more] theirs is s 
situation 

He said PBPC encourages 
proportional and sat rificial gj\ 

baaed on income, kit 10 per 
i ent is a good guideline 

"We would encourage stu 

dents to siart giving he said n 



u'U M«m now, chances are vou'll 
continue for a lifetime 

\N>ni 600 people attend 
Grace Baptist weekly, Bockus 
said including 150-200 college 

students 

11 Hit between KM ,ml 

opli attend Sunday eervic- 

es including about 100 col 
■ is. Katlifl said 

Hailii'tsatd tithing in importanl 
not only to fund churches' minis- 
iocs bul also as an expression ol 
the BJVW'a love and devotion to 
God 

l don i wuni mj bean to be 
i.itenai things bul 

lembei what really mailers in 
j In./ world.' Brown -• 



Students for Clean Air Manhattan 
use shoes to represent deaths p 




Steven Doll 1 1 ' 

As part of a duplay about secondhand smoke by the Students for Clean 
Air Manhattan, Marcia Lock*, public relations and outreach coordinator 
for the Center for Basic Cancer Research at K State, Hacks pjirs of shoes 
into a pile Thursday morning in the Bosco MuOent Pla/a. The display 
used 400 pairs of shoes to represent the about 400 Kansans who die 
annually due to secondhand smoke related illnesses 



Senate 

delays 

band 

decision 



By Logan C. Adams 

KANSAS SJAti UHUGIAN 

The Student Senate sent 
the K Slate Marching Baud 
privilege fee bill back to com 
nuttee Thursday night 

Matt Wagner, chairman ol 
the privilege fee committee, 
recommended the Senate 
send it back 

The Sen aie l hen voted 

unanimously to do 

Wagner said the reason 
was that discrepancies were 
found and needed m be re- 

. • d 

He also s,ud he expected 

l in- resist it bill lo be finished 

with liis committee Mondaj 
'"' Allocated 

reach tor a 

•u i be money 

"** ,IHtt Campus Crusade 

... ,m far Christ: $1,000 to 
attend regional con- 



I rank 



ference in Denver, Co 



di 

rector ol Chinese Students 
band s and Scholars As- 
said be sociation: S60S (or 
fore the Spiinq festival 

b^aZi Theta Alpha Phi: 

for a 15 Sl.OOOtoanend 

pen e n I * meriHn Colleoe 

increase Theatre festival at 

in fund the University ol 

ing from Minnesota 
the Sena 

io pa\ for rising operating 

hi expected no 
change in funding 

Well take anything we 

i [racz said 
The Senate also approved 

iimns lor ibree cam 
pus organizations inialing 

i be senate voted t" re- 
mow three words from the 
University Honor System's 
. onstitutiom 

The c bailee requires stu 

dents and [acuity to report all 

norn ot academic 

rnestj whenevei ai 

denm sanction is imposed or 

a hearing and Investigation 




ADVERTISE 
YOUR CHURCH HERE 

^ CALL 532-6560 # 



Weshicw Communih Church 



- - Worship services 9:00 a.m. 

10:45 a.m. 
Sunday school 9:00 a.m. 



Carol BuchheiiMi lybuchOim 

3001 Fort Riley Boulevard 

www.wcstviewionirinjniiy.com 

785-537-7173 



* A 



Unitarian 

Universalis! -4-;) 

Fellowship i 

ol Manhattan 



& 



Ki-ul (VlUth oil k 1 

>i tew mi K-llH^ nmhr/i 

-■■..; m h , 

■ 

fcWd IA] I '■■!>■ i rcirpiiuri 

ku Muh.kL-l NvIim 

H hb'M Unfit it' ' 




Wok mi r 

10:00 AM 



' 'Wn. 
ft untl Hiinily M 

WWW «»l 






First Presbyterian 

ssssssssssssssssssssssaaTChurch 



9:16 am. Worship Service 

9:15 am. Sunday School 

10:30 1 m. Worship Service 

5:W p.m. Contemporary Service 

8:00 p.m. Dinner for College Students 



Rev. Anne Scbeltwr. Amoc Pastor 

Rev R.C. UcConncIl, Pulor 
801 Leavenworth • 537 05 18 



« w M I II si pri'siiiailllalt.UM'Din 



First United Methodist Church 

Worship al 8:30, M5 and 1 1 :0<l 



(MM it K tft *«a li:ta Ih< HMtrr irMtilwaal nurthlu 
• Mil thiHti and arean >■ Mir hmaliful >ikIiio 

« MM iilillm * HI t'MW.I) ««f«lH|i In mm 
autlttufiuiii I rt. i)<>w*nnl< <S »l»»lr» l««| 
l.mth.n'l < MM» isMU OO 

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Jl SI t OMI 



ail Pojroli, Mantvitlan Kjm<i 
CAMPUS MINtSntV! Ctlasth •ul 

Ihrwrhtiln Klu.rdu, iimcm 



( imsRoads 



Sundays 5:30pm 
Wednesdays S-OOprn 

Hi l'U' 

Thursdays n:30pni 

Explore • Discover • Belong * Serve 



w 



St. Francis 

I'.IMSi OLI.tl 

Campus Ministry 



M Kam.is Swte Univmit* 



Sunday wnrstup " 
St PdUl s tp 1 M>f>fcH liui.lt 

Stttfi B Pi>ynb tanhfUAn 

i I .it) .1 m i 

I 



■ 

SI f 'jn- fv 1 jnuthor, : 
ih; i I. n 
[)pn VinLnij I'nmiT.irii i o,,rji r ■ . ■ 



t/wWit/ 
Epistopal Cbh 



■ 



■ in 
l+l 



Christian Science 
Society 



Sunday 10:30 a.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

KSU Campus 



Wed. 7:30 in Reading Room 

■ 

105 N. 4th St. 






(( ilfhxiiaiit 
Srti'ttf 

First Presbyterian t Imuh 

nworth 

TBS MIOSIS 
ki McCoiMsea 

i* r,icitn Amu' Schribfi 

! 'ii. li! J.,11 ■ ln^.lI'Ml Il.lli 

»M Ui\l|)i( m 1 1, il 1 1 1. H |. in nun 



CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP SERV 



> 



. 






T 



You are welcome at,.. 

I IRS I \SSI NMvl 1 I i 



For College Students 

(cJtHsliaiA'i ' p 

i, a ,i i h i 

Wednesday 8:00 p.m (KSUUnieThr 
Pastor Bryan Elliot! 

Sunday Services 

Sunday School 9:00 am 

Morning Worship 10 1 5 a m 
Evening Worship 6 00 p m 

,\«n#r» PlmidrJ fni \tt Sri > 



■ :iii 



6 



ma a 




Rev. Todd Weston, Pastor 

2310 Candlcwood Or. Manhattan, KS 66503 

(785) 537-7633 www.manhattanag.org 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Jay 10:00 p.m. 

p 

Sun A 30 p.m., 6 i 

' hdplaln 
711 Oenison 539*7496 



Grace ^' M m 
lunch — — 


k 


h. 


! 


♦ Surula) Warship 


♦ 


8: 1 t>.uti 






■ 




tV-0424 




m.v> bchurch. 


„,_. 



Come Worship 
With Us 

lit Church ot the Nazarene 

" ,' 

10:40 ' 
7:00 

1 uich 
M7ft 



+ 



St. Lake's 
Lutheran 

(hurch 

}Mi SuriMi Vvenin 

Saturday- 

I'ruiiilinn.i! Woi -■: b:M |i.m. 
Sandajr- 

K: in it.m. 

' 4- ,iin 

II > ii i . i 1 1 1 

i in. ill stiuhi •*.'•• UiiiiltilK.iiini 
l?B5l5.W.2MM 



Faith Evangelical Free Church 

•V. ' 8 00,10:30, 

10:40, 1200 

• today School at 915 



1971 ojme, Rd 

77( 




Ail Welcome to Worship! 

SaHatUr li'WIJHg '(iF'i Wimtt'ith Ltuiptl 

New mi rhunaayOct, 20 

pp m Meal & Dialog at lurhei NouM 

Andtnofl 

Nov S Walk Kon-.i Trails 



ilCA 1/ f 
113 iS9S 




III I Ml KAN 

I AMI'US 
MINISTR\ 



german mennonite meal, 
International craft 

r & BAKE SALE r 

t^J Sunday. November 13. 2005 l^^ 

I Noon - 6:00 PM 1 

Pottorf Hall -C1C0 Park 

- Interna tional Crafts - 

FlNl HA1 ,rrs urass, wood, Nativity 

-.1 I S 'l A LRY, HOLIDAY DECOftATIONS, AND MONl 

- 

- Dinner - 

rorscht (chicxt n ii veoetabi e soup - no beitts!), 

homemade bread, whole hog sausage. 

Nlw Year's Cookik 

ONE DOLLAR FROM EVERY TICKET WILL 
BENEFIT SHEPHERD'S CROSSING 

Admits S8.00 Children under 1Z $4.50 
Sponsored by the Manhattan Mennonile Church 539-4079 



■Mm 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



OPINION 






To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion, 

Michael Ashfofd 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brownback 
Matthew Girard 
Matt Gorney 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoia 
Alex Peak 
Catrlna Rawson 
Kristen Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

New security 

program should 

be monitored 

A Transportation Security Administra- 
tion official recently testified in front of 
a Senate subcommittee about the new 
"Registered Traveler" program. 

This program will allow travelers to pay 
an $80 fee for the luxu- 
ry of quicker and more 
lenient security checks 
and US airports. 

As part of the pro- 
gram, travelers will pay 
the fee, have to clear an 
extensive background 
check and provide bio- 
metric data as proof of 
identity. These people 
will also be exempt 
from the random 
screenings so many of 
us have come to enjoy 
as a part of our travel- 
ing experience 

They will still have to walk through 
metal detectors and have carry-on bag- 
gage screened the same as anyone else. 

Since Sept. 11, traveling at U.S. airports 
usually means long security lines, requir- 
ing passengers to arrive long before their 
flight is scheduled to depart. 

The TSA is on the right track in imple- 
menting this program. However, there is 
also a need for added vigilance. 

His the responsibility of the TSA to 
have a process which recertifies the secu- 
rity of each person within the program. 

We will all rejoice when air travel no 
longer requires question-asking officials 
sifting through personal belongings. 

Right now, airlines arc struggling to 
remain afloat and people are, at the least, 
nervous about flying. The program has 
the opportunity to breathe fresh air into 
a fledgling industry by decreasing time 
spent dealing with security. 

As long as adequate safeguards assure 
those in the program are not risks, the 
TSA should expand the program. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letter* to the editor. They tan be 
submitted by e-mail to ltnm@spub.kiu.edu, or in person to 
KerM 1 16 Please include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and darrty 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



(~ 


11 ft 1 S A i 


S T A T I 


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,OLLEG 


-IAN 


Matthew Otmd 


Johenn* SerMt 


Krliton Roderick 


IDHWUKHiEl 


«•■■ KING (DUO* 


mmgi 


MMtOomty 


CMrtiu Rjwton 


MkhMiAthford 


com mil 


MSK IDITOK 


SWS (01 TO* 


Annette Liwkii 


Abby Btownbtck 


MeirPMfc 


UIMoVlOHW 


0JJMMM 


[HUKtlMIM 


JonuHogg 


Anthony Mendou Cunlt Johnson 


WHOM ftNKM 


>'HIMNIAIimiDITM 


ONIWFDtTM 


DeveSferatti 


Br»d Slmmooi 


Andy Walter 


t. 


tBHMWtJ 


*HT ADMMMta 



CONTACT US 



Kansas State Collegian 
Kerfzle 103 
Manhattan, IS #6501 

Display ads 532-6S60 



Classified ads S32-6SSS 

Newsroom 532-6556 

newmpub.tou,edu 

i>ii«ry problems, 5J2-65SS 



France fries 

Racism, poverty, intolerance 
fuel fires behind French rioting 



Rioting in the streets 
of Paris and other 
French cities has raised 
many concerns about 
the issues and disci m- 
tentment that the youth 
fill rioters are expn 
ing 

Triggered at the end 
of October with the ac- 
cidental electrocution of 
two North African teen 
agers who though) I lit- y 
were being chased by the police, 
the French have faced riots Uiat 
are exposing the underlying 
issues and structural problems 
that have fueled this explosive 
violence. 

France has the largest Mus- 
lim population in Europe, wilh 
immigrants coming from African 
and Arab countries, many from 
the old colonics of Franc: e I 
people are faced with high un- 
employment and the prospect of 
living in inferior housing con 
plexes, as well as facing racism 
and intolerance within society 

Adjusting between the diverse 
cultures that are being combined 
is a hard and imperfect task, and 
the extreme poverty and lack DJ 
opportunities to build a bcitei 
standard of living and different 
way of life has resulted in (In 
restlessness of many French- born 
children of immigrants 

As (he government imple- 
ments curfews and deploys 
increasing numbers of police to 
quell the rioters, the problem 
behind the anger needs to be ad 
dressed to correct the cracks that 
have bred these problems. Simpk 
calming the streets and stopping 
destruction will not have lasting 
results or solutions. 

Poverty is a powerful is 
sue thai has enormous impa- 
on people's lives Fighting to 
scrounge enough money for food, 
housing and clothing leaves link- 
time for anything else, includ- 
ing education thai can lead to 
new opportunities and a belter 
existence. Many struggling people 




RACHEL 
THOMPSON 



move into the worsening 
suburbs because there is 
nowhere else they can 
afford to go 

Condition) of the neigh- 
borhoods are deteriorat- 
ing and getting public 
services is increasingly 
problematic for those liv- 
ing in these crime-strick- 
en suburbs The city's 
service people, like utility 
worker! and firefighters, 
have refused to enter the worst 
parts of the suburbs because ihev 
fear the violence of the gangs. 
Racism and intolerance is a 
hard issue to solve because of its 
complexity Injuslice is a serious 
concern While many may think 
these riots are originating from 
fundamentalist Islamic groups 
because the majority of rioters 
ire Muslim, they are mistaken. 

[here is a high concentra- 
tion of Muslims in these suburbs 
but it is the social and economic 
situation as well as racism that 
have fueled the violence, not 
the religious background of the 
individuals, which is merely a 
coincidence. 

The people surviving in I he 
decrepit suburbs just want the 
chance to live a better life while 
getting a better education, having 
nicer places to live, and having 
an opportunity to work A reduc 
tii ui * if I he disrespect and racism 
directed al their culture and 
religion is another cause 

The riots in the broken-down 
suhurbs of French cities is not 
a mindless display of violence; 
it is a call for attention, a cry 
for society to make some much 
needed changes that will make 
lives better fnr those thai suffer to 
survive. 

These people just want to have 
belter lives 



Rachel Thompson U a sophomore in 
anthropology and international 
studies. Please tend your com 
ments to opinion .^ipub.kfu.idu. 



1 




Holiday season a time for helping out 



ADDIE 
LAUE 




We can alt put away 
the fishnets and Napo- 
leon Dynamite wigs; 
Halloween is over And 
we've finally gotten 
our mid-term grades 
back (yikes, at least we 
still have almost half 
a semester to fix that) 
All this means jusl one 
thing: the holidays are 
jusl around the corner. 
I love the anticipa- 
tion uf the holidays There's 
enough good food to make you 
sick, Christmas lights, and my 
favorite. Black Friday What 
more could a person want? 
While I'm getting more 
spirited by the day, I'm 
left wondering how 
the holidays could 
possibly make 
so many people 
around me want 




action until Ian 

After I pul I I idle 

thought Into It, ii 

started to iti.iki .1 litlle 
sense I don't really do 
any of the cooking - Oi 
grocery shopping 
(hal matter 
I don't |il 
family will he where, 
and it's nn 1 my re 
sponsibilily 10 fill an) 
stockings I do shop 
for Christmas presents for my 
family and friends, but I eotud 
hardly call that a chore for me 

Maybe 1 1 seem DUch 

fun to me because all 1 do is 
show up and eat what's hcen 
cooked and open wi 
wrapped. 

Besides the stress of plan 
ning, cooking and shopping 
and of course paying for it all . 
there is family at the hoiid 
Suiiuiimes big families in small 
places. At my h 1 - 

ui i Mas 

musk ciMi.ilk 
drowned out 
by crashing, 

thudding on the 
Khtflt, 

Nn, my family 
is not likely to be on 
an episode of Cop* 
My house is full of little 
cousins, nieces and nepli 
ews, all of whom have nol 
gotten much sleep in thi 
two days and who have usu- 
ally eaten at least one gianl 
chocolate Santa and too many 
Christmas cookies to count 



All the adults in the house 
mnl for all their hard work is 
to have one conversation with 
each other thai is not inter 
ru pled by something crashing 
followed by someone wailing ot- 
to scramhle to find batteries for 
one more beeping, music-play* 
ing toy 

While I do usually chip in 
on washing Ihe dinner dishes, 
I'm beginning to see how (hat 

1 1 quite cut it. 1 am 22 
now, and there is no reason 
why I shouldn't be more helpful 
than I have been. ^^ 

I enjoj having a good 
1 1 inversation with my family as 
much as anyone, but I think it's 
lair that for all that has been 

1 1 make my holiday pe r—— 
ieet, I spend some time entefc-— 
taming Ihe kids with a football 
game or snowman-building 

ide 

1 could grocery shop for my 
mom to give her a litlle extra, 
time I am even looking forward 
to helping with the cooking, ■ 
as long as I'm more help thajET 
trouble 

Kids are supposed to enjoy 
the holidays, but as I've gotten 
older, my holiday spirit has got- 
ten a little off balance After all, 
it is Ihe season of giving, and I 
want to give back to my family 
lust a little of the joy they've 
worked so hard to give me over 
the years. 



JuMIt Lmm Hi junior in 
otfMH. Mms* tend your 

opinion ^spub. kut.edu. 



IV 



CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's 
aronymtxis call in system, The fourum h 
edited to eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 
and libelous comments The comments are 
not the opinion of the Collegian nor ait 
they endorsed by the editorial staff, 

Is it my 4*arte from KU? Because why 

am I the first one to speak up about the 
disturbing "FOR SALE; three meal goats' 
classified that's been running in the Col- 
legian all week? 



until Mil pitied that fool. 

When Chudt Harris plays Oregon Trail 
his family does not die from cholera or 
dysentery, but rather roundhouse kicks to 
the face He also requires no wagon, since 
he carries the oxen, aides and buffalo meat 
on his bade He always makes it to Oregon 
before you. 

No, you fuyi dent MMfentaiMl. I really 
got to pee. 



S« cent was formally known as One Dohar I new thought the iiywowd com* 



when none of the 16,000 songs on my 
computer sound good, but at least they 
sound better than what's coming from 
next door 

Have you ever had the new Chew It 
Fiesta Cheesy Taco flavored crackers? It's 
like an entire campus party and only my 

mouth Is invited. 

Is It sad that I can't tell you what my 
Geology teacher talked about tot an hour, 
but I can fill you In on every detail K you 
missed the Fourum today? Yes. 



To my future husband: Please propose 

via the Fourum Thanks. 

To the girl that told me that I had a 

booger hanging, you are really hot. 

Hey ... is this In the Fourum? Oh ray 

God I have so many people to thank, my 
.uf,. 



It's not our government's Job to judge 
terrorists. We can leave the judgement up 
to God All we have to do is help arrange 
the mee ting 



I Ihre everyday like it was my last, mostly 
because I live in Marian and use the eleva- 
tors 

The thought Just crossed my mind to 

go to my 10:30 calc lecture, but then tt 
quickly passed. 

Evhxerate the proletariat. 

forgive me If I sound condescending 
when I say this, but you are one pathetk 
loser. 



Have you seen my baseball? 



A 



Well how the hell did you get the beans 
above the frank? 

According to the map we've only gone 
about foui inches You know, I don't think 
we have enough gas money. 



Need more Fourum? (oft 
www.knattfollegloM.tom for the full 
version, 



♦ 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page r > 



Special Olympics arrive 
in town for Fall Classic 



By Adrlanne OeWeese 

KANSAS SIMt (01 1 [WAN 

Aboul 1,400 Kansas athletes 
will participate in the fifth an- 
nual Special Olympics Kansas, 
Fall Classic today and Saturday 
in Manhattan 

Teams of one to 100 athletes 
will compete in volleyball and 
bowling competitions at the 
K-staie student Union, Enters 
Recreation Complex and Zuck 
ey Bowl Inc. 

Voninteet iBl needed 

to assist athletes on the bowl 
ing lanes, to tally scores and 
to present awards, said Susan 
Krumni, volunteer coordinatoi 
for Special Olympics Kansas 

M interested in volun 
leering should bring a photo id 
and check in at the volunteer 
tabic for an >nt, Kruimn 

said 

Eunice Kennedy Shriver or 



Volunteers still needed 

When: 9:30 a.m. noon today and 8: JO 

to It am. Saturday 

Where: the K State Student Union and 

Zuckey Bowl Inc (Si 5 Rkhardi Drive} 
For a tentative whedule of events: 

oo lo www.h-' 



ganized the Pint International 

Special Olympi* i ■ in 

id Special Olympics 
Kansas began in 1970 
cording to its Web site. Special 

Olympics Kansas has 5,800 

athletes who train and COHlj 
in 2} sports 

Krumm said the pun 
of the Pall Classic is In nffet a 
howling and volleyball 
i petition for athletes with 
mental disabilities. 

Lil will 

go to Special Olympics Kansas 

'The athletes look forward 



to Ihe event even, 

said It's not just tot tin 
petition aspect, hut also for the 
social , i spec I" 

Student organizations vol- 
unteering If the Fall Classic in- 
clude leadership classes, Alpha 
Chi i hnega, Delta Delta Delta 
and It h thus Christian Fellow- 
ship 

Alpha Chi will have about 

20 members interacting with 

partictp mts and helping with 

I -lit. said [aymc Saubcr, 

• in family and consumer 

nd Alpha Chi mem 

bet 

iid she has volun- 
teered a I the even I in the past 
and it was a rewarding expe-n - 

[ways 
so happy and grateful for the 

volunteers she said "It re 

ally makes rohntteering worth- 




Steven D.. I 
After correctly answering a question with only second* remaining, Mike Barta, senior in biology, receives 
a pat on chest from Willie Meier, senior in horticulture, during a sports trivia contest Thursday night at 
Petejs Recreation Complex. 

8 students participate 
in intramural sports trivia bowl 



2 By Chuck Armstrong 
-^ KANSASSTATf CQtLI 

I on their 

knowledgt irtvia dur 

Trivia 
i Thursday night at the 

HuMv seven indivi 

competed m s 4 ~> minute mil 
il-ji prelimi 

mphi 

howl style final round 

The pre! i i 

sisled of till QjMesUO 
divided among four 

ill. basketball Football 
and miscellaneous said [ohn 
Wondr 



rect' 

"Tin 
typt 

mia - i 

vi lived," he sail 
One corn 

ulty 

li 

. kel 

ing Mud 

ll junior in second 

n t. lie. is Sullivan A 

Mil 

lardet Hi i 

h ird 



ones a 

u get 

or Lafenc 

com- 

I'm a 
I 

■ 

I in the 

NIWI- 



IVeVe got the stories yoi/Ve got to mi 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzie 101, Stop by or call 532-6555. 



Fundraiser at Cold Stone Creamery 
benefits Humanics Student Association 




Sl»'- . 

At Manhattan's Cold Stone Creamery, Dan Patrick, senior In mass oommunlcatl 

dish during a fundraiser for the American Humanics Student a n on Thursday, 



By Megan Green 
KANSAS STATE COtlfOIAN 

The American Humanics m i 
dent Association became tin 

organization to combine fund 

i nu with Manhattan's t 
Stone Creamery, 1225 Moro St., 
Thursday night 

White two group me 
SCOOped I others distrib- 

uted information aboul Alls 
customers, 

We arrived 2i* mlnuti 

lore so they could show us how 
to scoop and (ti id Danny 

Iroop, freshman m leoDndary 

education and treasure! 
Cold Stone will 



15 percent of .ill the mu 
earned Thursd 
8 p in 10 ANSA said 
phet 

nior in l< 

Cold Stone will y^<- M ISA a 

"Its reall] 

[i to do ill 

The group is work 
in 

national i 

ing several fun 

work at I and 

im field 



Al H. i 



Irish poet reads at Manhattan Public Library 



By Logan C. Adams 
KANSASS1A 

more than 50 people si the 
nhattan Public Ltbrei 
da]/ afternoon 

Ihe t 

in Irish poet al tier last 

stop in a short series ol poetrj 

iin^.s before returning to Ire- 
land. 

Cannon read to the 
ence SJ they drank lea and 

munched ion's 

irked with ni of 

her home land, was verj quiet 
throughout the performs 

i i • 

lull hut people were mi it 

toward i in front 

I reel son .>i like prie * 
pari- dd 

Cannon stalled each poem 
wild .t bit nl background (O sei 

ihe context and then began read- 

.... , : 

Her- ill f don't 

.Hen' she said, set 

the piece's Idle as .1 punt h I 

It's culled No Sense m tall; 

Cannon was ifi Man! 
1 k mna i'mis 
professor of English, met her last 
while on sabbatical in Ire- 
land and an-angcd the readJI 



who 



■ 

Potts 

poet 1 1 

her to ! - 

spent (in 

cludi 
Lout! I 

writ; I 
da. 

to hei home it 

Katis 

ci'd the perforin- 

...I at the 
i ml of "No Sense I 



.: 







2 




Ben Franklin CitaktA *%\ 

and p-mm€ S4*ft " 

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE 

Friday 1 1 all Sunday I.Uh 
lilid.it molt rings end ti 

Also .t large selct don ol i n 

(ireat Specials 

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Page 6 



ROAD TRIP 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 




W 



K-State (4-5, 1-5) vs. Nebraska (5-4, 2-4) 

1 p.m., Saturday 

History: Nebraska leads series — 72- 1 5-2 

Radio: 1350AM, I01.SFM 



Allan Ev ridge wu MtiMjaed 

to wear red 'Ihi'n Nehrsdu 

fired coach I r.ink Solidi.,iniJ 

l : vndgv took back his verbal 

commitment, lhis will be the 

first lime fie steps int. . Memo 

rial Stadium dace he watched 

every gam* from the (tends 

hfcjenior year of high school 



t 



n 



Running out of time 





vs. 




OFFENSE 



Allan Kvrtdgr is 0-4 
■ n the Marling 
quarterback. In confer- 
ence play, the Wildcats 
are ranked last in the cunferoncc, 
mn mug for an avt>r<mr ul 1.5 yards 
per carry, and last in total offense, 
averaging 271 yard* per ganu- 



£* 



Coach Bill <.ill.ili.tn'>. 
West Coast offense 
ha* yet to click for Ihe 
Cornhuskers who are averaging 
24 points per game in confer 
ence play. Nebraska was held to a 
'..mm hi low 138 total yards in last 
weeks loss tn K.i n s.is 



DEFENSE 



Iowa State had a sea 
son high 221 yards rush 
tug la% I week against 
the Wildcat defense. Ihe No. 10 
ranked pass tlt-lense in confer- 
cao pl-iv wifl K''' BSHad this week 
against the throw first Nebraska 
Weil t oast offense 



'til 



The Cornhuskers lead I 
Ihe nation in sacks (40)1 
and tackles for a loss ■ 
("7) Junior defensive end Adam 

Carrtkei leads the Caeattaiahan 

with eight sacks for 72 yards. 
Sophomore linebacker < 
McKeon has seven. 



SPECIAL TEAMS 



Catrina Raws on | (01 
Senior fullback Vic tor Mann tries to get past the Iowa State defense Nov. S. The Wildcats need a win against the Nebraska Cornhusk- 
ers and Missouri Tigers to become eligible for a bowl game. 

Loss would prevent K-State from becoming bowl eligible 



By Anthony Mendoza 

KANSAS iTAHCOlUGIAN 

Jeroini/y Clary and Ihe rest 
ui the senior Class can do some- 
thing tins Saturday that no olher 
senior class has done in ihe his 
torj of the program. 

rhej can become ihe first 
class to beat Nebraska every 
time they have played ihctn 

If they lose, they will become 
part of the first team since 1989 
to lose live straight games - and 
be eliminated from bowl consid- 
eration lor the second straight 
season - after making the post- 
season 1 2 straight years. 

i approach needs to be 
let's go do as well as we can 
and win this game,' and ihen the 
bow! possibility looms a little bit 
brighter." coach Bill Snyder said 



they're aware of it, and I've ad- 
dressed the issue with ti> 

With <>nlv two game* re- 
maining, and the Wildcats need 
itig two wins to become bowl 
eligible, Saturday's name at Ne- 
braska is a must win (or K Stale, 
whose only win this year in con- 
ference came at home against 
Kansas. 

Clary said the Wildcats are 
overdue for a win this weekend, 
and they need to do something 
they have not done in confer 
ence - play a complete game. 

"We didn't play a complete 
name against Kansas, hut w 
definitely overdue," Clary said 

I would like to have one (a 
complete game), it kitid ol heats 
the confidence down. I would 
love lo be able to have a com 

plete osme, complete Four quar- 



ters of offense and good del. 
and would be a great thing for us 
going into the Missouri jj 

114 into Saturday's game, 

K. State finds itself in ihe same 
position they were in lasl seasi m 
with two games remaining. 

K-State did not re*| 
dropping the final two games 
The firsl on the road in the Ii 

nalsc. Is to Colorado and (he 

nexi at home to Iowa State jiiv 
ing tip three touchdowns wiifi 
less than four minutes lo play 

"I think we're frustrated, but 
we re not going lo back down 
like in 2004, and 1 don't want 
anyone to corn pare us to 2004," 
Clary said. "Were nnl the same 
team, we may have the same 
record right now, but we don't 
give up, we fight, and we do the 
best we can lo try In ^et back in 



Nebraska can become bowl 

(he 

12 

DTI lead 
dorado in 
Mil • i;t bowlappear 

witfi ear. 

Ii is essential es] 
tfie road - that the Wildcats lo 
cus on the Huskcri and drown 
out the lan noise, said leniot 
fullback Victor Mann 

"It's just aboul us gel ting a 
win," Mann said We have 
win mi matter what We have lo 
go out there and do all we can to 
git a win, and it doesn't matter 
where we are playing ai, who's 

going to tie I here Once we 

between (how white lines, we 
1 the job done 



I'he sporadic play from 
Ihe special teams unit 
continued In last week* 

loss at Iowa Stair Iraifing 17 I 
.ill. > Miphomurt- fi'ff Snndgraw 
connected from ''■ v.inls nut. hit 
neit attempt from 2K yards was 
t eked by the < ydOB 



ti 



Nebraska ranks Nth 
in the nation overall in' 
pom returns ,,m1 fifth in 
punting, led hy Ray Guy semifi 
nalist Sam Koch. Koefi averages 
45.4 yards per punt, including a 
career long 84 yard punt against 

Pit ts b ur g h . 



PREDICTION 



k State hai be) tour straight 

yUMS. Nclir.iskj has lns,t IflMt 
straight. Both teams have howl 
bids ii. With 

llit ( nrnfiuskefs become 
bowl eligible, alter not qualify 
iBf tor the tirvi tune in t 
lln Wildt.il, need to win iheir 
fins] two BJUntl Ol ihe >r.isun in 

M bowl eligible, 
. 1 1 1 1 r mittlng ilu- pusiseasnn l.isi 



ftm lor the first time in i 
suns. I vpecting the Wildcats to 
walk into Lincoln, Neb., on senior 
da) isith a bowl bid on the line 
for Nebraska is too much lor this 
young team that has been out 
noted on the road in conference 
play 147-58 lo overcome 

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Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



ROAD TRIP 



Page 7 



Evridge puts past behind him 



By Angle Hanson 

KANittSWICOllEGIAN 

Allan Evridge's friends 
and fans couldn't 
fathom why he chose 
to play football at 
K -Stale two years ago, wben ha 
had the golden opportunity to 
live every native Nebrask.m *. 
dream and play football in Lin 
coin. Neb 

What they didn't realize was 
Evridge wasn't a native He 
'lull i t have those deep n 
ties to the Corn buskers like 
those around him. It wasn't his 
dream - it was theirs 

"In Nebraska, they are quit* 
fanatical in a (tin id way," the 
redshirt freshman said of his 
Sends :<nd fans "They sup- 
port their team, and they are a 

great sal of fans, but a l'>i of my 
friends who had grown up in 

Nebraska their whole lives did 
not understand 

"It was a dream, of course, 
growing up, and since t did not 
grow up there, il bad not been 
my life long dre 

In reality, though, Evridge 
w.LMi'l to blame After playing 

PapiUion LaVtsta High School 

in I'apillion. Neb, lie gave i 
verba! o mmitment to - then 
Nebrask i coach Prank Solich. 
It wasn't long thereafter thai 

a pmpuvd in pla> ;it K- SI ate 
eame via mail from coach Bill 
Miyder While the Wildcat tiller 
was appealing, being a man oi 

bis word, Evridge declined 
I had always been inter 

ested (in k state), but i com 

milled to coach Solich and his 

program before i had gotten an 

qffer,' Ei ridge said "I thought 

my word Was very iiiinnrlaiil, 

and I wasn't going in bach nil 

It was kind oi the 

ted " 

The firing o( coach Solich 

103, fur failing In 
maintain the Comhuskn 
tional powerhouse status, put a 
new spin i m things tur Evridge 
lie was row confronted with a 
ind play under 
Nebraska touch Bill Calls 
hu or wear purple for Snyder ' 
Obviously, he chose the la 

I change in the V 

i :| |usi knowing wha! 
ild have at Kansas State 
program it we 

id oi ilmigs 

cd to his decision to be t 

i u ben i would lum 

on the TV and sec (burner quur 

terback) EH Knbersun - t liked 

what 1 saw from that asp 

Callahan on the Othet I 
did not like ' dec i 

Sinti Once lie was unified head 

roach, he continued to pursue 
the quarterback He contacted 

bit 1 1 the weekend aftet I 
hired, trying to persuade him to 




Christopher Hinewin<k*l I I I 
K- State redshirt fieshman quarterback Allan Evridge tries to outrun the Iowa State defense Nov, 5 in 
Ames. Iowa. The Wildcats take on the Nebraska Cornhuskers Saturday In Lincoln, Neb. 



.md Siill a man of 
his won refused, and 

committed to K-S 
animosity grew in Ncbr>> 

lhal hap 
pent d luce to k 

itl i said <it 

hat happi 

C mitmeni 

from Nebraska "I think h « i 
small minority speaking fot the 
majority ul tl tans 

i whole, >' i great fan 

base, and i hav< miih 

As t or the 

■ ! he 
led 

red in 

will nol 
perft 



football team n iboul 

For hun. H 

braska is no differenl than an) 
other, he sim I 

"I've seen il I know wh 
like,' Bvridj 
Lincoln "It's mure 
.md < »\ right now and trying to 
gel the game plan down and put 
a win in the win col 

Like Evridge, Snyder 

ight in the 
hype, despite his quarterback's 

lusUirv will) thi 
He reiterated I 
menls ic's seen no dil 

lerem l UIOI m the 

>la\s build 
"I reaJIj 

JJy think I"' i- 

dn ev> a Snyder said 

Hi s mil totally unaware ol go 



Ing there, but I think his I 

on whal he i an do to gel himsell 
better and to help o ill I 

II I m in 

•■led 

' aney 

it) wants in d can 

to give K-Stale and Bvridgi 

- a win 

. 

lev. UJW 

he nude an iniprc- 

iid 

i II Hill, 

said 'He's defini g to 

nmped up and ho| 

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SALOON 



Ross key to Nebraska's 
West Coast offense 



By Ccdriqu* Flemmlng 
HAdSASSWfl iOll [cian 

Mu k Stale Wildcats (4 5, i 

i Bi] ' • ' (I lo win their 

final two games ol the s 
become bowl eligible 

I he llisl ol lilt, v tWO 
comes (Ins weekend n 

Wilde. lis travel to Um • 

Neb li> takt "I, the Nell- 

' 'tl 

ihe Huskers have losl foui 

ul llieit last I'M' gatTK 

coming nit a 40 t \ loss in the 
Kansas layh&u ks end 

They, too will bi looki • 

i i bi '«i 

this weekend 

Nebi Zac 

Tayl ■ 

•.hull 

j ay hawks pushing In 

fifth higli 

Nebraska sophon 
receiver lerr 

: opposii 

■ 
in tl 

Coach Hill Sn 
impressed will 
lot and 

led bj 

"Ross is a 

ilnn I ul •• ' 

nl . . 

I Ic 

nol <« 



■ re 
i He is third on the team 
with 29 receptions and has 

miij; 

when Nebraska defeated 
laws State on Oct I, Rosa 

■■'il ei-.'iH pa out of the 
[field Im n Nebraska run- 

I i yards Ha 
dded all three ol die Husk 
touchdowns, icorinf on a 

nil sen en pass, a one yard 
luiitvvn run and an eight 
jrard reception in win the e.aine 

The Wildcat defense gave 
! i » yards ol total owns* 

In a 
loss m 
ihe t y< i 
iim 
ni than yards 

>l the 

I Ik 

the 

run. allowing 

nd ranks 

1 III !l,lllll|],|! 

■ une 

■ 

ed three 
linsl the 

■ the im 

.file lo slop a 

tike Moss 

lech run- 
. Hen lerson 

111 thai lie i- "i .mia/inn run 

all." 

played 

im fin a I now 

II d make 

(be abil 
uwn the running 
. i tl 
If wi can do 

1 
:ii winning." 




Ross 

INC. RAO 



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Page 8 




MATTHEW 

GIRARD 



Football 
team needs 
to show us 
something 



I have spcnl this entire 
football season watching as 
a fan and. for the must part, 
I have kepi 
my mmith 
shut ubuut the 
struggles of 
the 2005 
K-State foot- 
ball team Not 
this week 
This week, 
I'm calling the 
Wildcats out 
On Saturday, 
^^^^^~ you have the 
chance to make a statement 
against the Nebraska Corn 
huskers Do it for yourselves 

I'm sure you are tired of 
hearing the same questions 
week after week about what is 
wrong with your team 

I know because Collegian 
sports reporters are tired of 
asking those questions. 

This is the game where you 
show everyone that you are 
better than you are playing 
right now, instead of making 
us roll our eyes when you give 
us that answi-r 

This is the game where the 
offensive line and the running 
backs show us why you're on 
this team by pushing so r un- 
people around and bowling 
people over 

You shouldn't be looking at 
statistics, but in the past three 
games, you are only averag- 
ing 40 yards rushing - and 
vou have been held under or 
below that number five times 
this season. 

This is the game where the 
wide receivers prove why they 
are called "receivers." 

How many dropped passes 
does it take to realize you 
need to be looking at the ball 
all the way in? 

It's your job to take the 
pressure off a redshirt- fresh- 
man quarterback in Allan Evr- 
idge 

Catch the ball 

This is the game where you, 
Mr. Evridge. gel to give your 
quasi-home state the middle 
finger, and make us believe 
you are the next great Wildcat 
quarterback - not the guy who 
threw two costly interceptions 
in last week's 45-17 loss to 
Iowa State. 

Tins is the game where the 
defensive line and linebackers 
need to step up and make the 
Comhuskers sorry for even 
thinking about running the 
ball 

If you haven't noticed, 
safety Marcus Watts is your 
leading tackier 

That means you are not 
stopping anyone 

Above all, this is the game 
where yuu have in stop shoot- 
ing yourselves; in the foot In 
nine games, you have been 
penalized 76 times for 666 
yards, have not had one game 
without a turnover, and have a 
Big 12 Conference-leading 14 
fumbles. 

You could tell us the other 
team is making plays, but that 
is just another excuse. 

Making good decisions and 
hanging onto the ball are men 
i,i I i sues 

You are only two wins away 
from being bowl eligible, and 
at 4-5, you must start with 
the Huskers. 

Coach Bill Snyder has said 
he believes in you, and there 
are still many Wildcat fans 
who do, too. 



Matthew Glnrd is a senior In print 
Journalism. You can e-mail him at 
fportmpubkw^u 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



VOLLEYBALL 






K-State to try for series sweep of Texas A&M 



By Mark Potter 
KAKU5M00UKUM 

The K Slate volleyball team 
ha> ttiugjded to win matches 
during the past month. 

Despite Wednesday's 3-1 
victory over Texas Tech, the 
Wildcats (17-8. 8-7 Big 12) have 
dropped five o( eight mulches in 
that span, causing them to fall 
out of the Top 25 for the first 
time in more than two months 

Coach Su/ic Fritz said she 
docs noi pay much attention to 
the rankings 

1 don't put a lot of slock in 
it," Rritz said "1 think if Wfl da 
what we are capable of doing 



here at the end of the year, we 
will still put ourselves in a good 
position to make a run in the 
NCAA Tournament " 

In addition to rankings, Fritz 
barely acknowledged the 107- 
victory mfttHlnnn she earned in 
i!u C 'ais' Wednesday win, pul- 
ling her >U a lie with Mary I'hyl 
Dwight for second in K- Slate 
all -time wins 

"I like to win, bul it's not 
about the wins for me," Fritz 
said. 

Wilh only five regular sea- 
son matches remaining, K-State 
will take on Texas A&M (11- 
12, 4-10) at 1 p.m. Saturday in 
College Station, Texas. 



Fritz's squad will not only 
try for a second straight victory, 
but a series sweep against the 
Aggies. 

The last time the two teams 
played. K-State defeated then- 
No. 23 Texas A&M with a 3-0 
sweep Oct 1 

Junior outside hitter Sandy 
Wemer led the Wildcats against 
the Aggies with 14 kills on 19 
total attempts for a 737 hitting 
percentage. 

Texas A&M is led by 2004 
second-team All American 
Laura Jones. The senior outside 
hitter leads the Big 12 Confer 
ence in kills with 489, averag- 
ing 5.89 per game 



Werner said she expects 
Texas A&M to fight hard on its 
home court. 

"Playing at Texas A&M is al- 
ways tough," Wemer said. "I'm 
sore they have improved since 
we saw UVm last." 

"They will be especially 
good at home," sophomore set- 
ter Stacey Spiegelbcrg said, 'To 
beat them, were are definitely 
going to have to play hard and 
intense." 

K Slate's trip to the Lone 
Star state is its third since Oct 
22 and its second this week 

"I don't like going there," 
Werner said while laughing 
"I'd rather play at home" 



Lingering questions 





Above: Clent Stewart tries to get around Emporia 
State's Tyrell Sledge Thursday evening at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 

Left: K- State's Cartier Martin and David HosWns 
go for a rebound against Emporia State Thursday 
evening in the Wildcats 79- 7 5 win at Bramlage 
Coliseum, Martin scored 27 points and Hoskins 
scored eight 

Photo* by Catrina Rawson | HUMAN 



Wildcats edge Hornets in final exhibition game 



By Nick Dunn 
KANSAS StATt COI U&IAN 

In a game I hat proved to be a series 
of opposite runs, the K-State men's bas- 
ketball team edged Division II Emporia 
State 79-75 Thursday night in Bramlage 
Coliseum 

It was the final exhibition match be- 
fore the regular season begins next Friday, 
and the Wildcats left many questions to 
be answered after a somewhat shaky per 
formance 

"We didn't come out to play our best 
game, obviously," junior guard lance Har- 
ris said "We had a lot of shaky things, 
and a lot of things we need to work on." 

Right from the start, K- State knew Em 
peril State had come not just to play, but 
to win 

The Hornets opened the game with a 
10-0 run in the first two minutes of play 
K- Stale responded quickly, going on a 16- 
run of its own to help the team cnmi 
to a comfortable 42-31 half time lead 

"There are just so many games within 
the game," coach Jim Wooldridge said. 
"The way we started the game, it was a 
big surprise (Emporia State) is an excel- 
lent team" 

Indeed, the Hornets proved to be a 
much tougher test than expected After 



(ailing behind 57-40 midway through the 
second hall, Emporia State went on a 19 
3 run to close the gap to 60-59 with 7:03 
remaining in (he game. 

The game went back and forth until 
the Wildcats eventually sealed the victory 
with a Mario Taybron fast-break layup 
with seven seconds remaining. 

Junior forward Cartier Martin was the 
star of the night Martin had 27 points oil 
lG-of-16 shooting, and added 10 rebounds 
and six assists. 

Had it been a regular season game, 
Martin would have had new career highs 
in both points and assists. 

"1 was feeling good," Martin said of his 
performance Last game. I didn't shoot 
the hall loo well, so I made that an em- 
phasis It felt good coming up. I know I 
can shoot the ball, so I put the ball up" 

Martin carried the Wildcats in the sec- 
ond half, scoring 15 points, including two 
crucial buckets late in the game to help 
keep the Hornets from taking the lead 

Martin's teammate, sophomore point 
guard Clent Stewart, said he was very 
pleased with Martin's emergence as a go 
to player. 

"He played really well," Stewart said 
"He was snooting the ball as well as he 
could He curried us in the second half 
He was our go-to guy and at the end, he 



K-State 79 Emporia State 75 

E5U 

Field goals 

3 potnl 

Ffee throws 

Rebounds 




lumovers 



Mart* 

Leading rebounder Martin 



made some big buckets for us. He's a tre- 
mendous player." 

This game might be considered a cause 
for concern, especially since the players 
expressed disappointment with their de- 
fensive performance At the same time, 
they said they know things will improve 

The game Thursday could, in fact, give 
the team valuable experience in the future 
in close, regular season games 

"This team has to get a little bit more 
competitive mentality" Stewart said "At 
times we were a little too casual 1 don't 
care who we're playing, we have to prove 
(ourselves) every single game. We haven't 
arrived We have a lot to prove" 



ROWING 



Jayhawks come to Manhattan to compete in Sunflower Showdown 



By jMtka Barnard 

KANSAS SMTUOUIGIAN 

The rowing team hopes 
to beat a familiar opponent 
on Saturday at the Sunflower 
Showdown 

The Wildcat rowers will be 
competing in their last regatta 
of the fall season against in- 
trastate rival Kansas at Tuttle 
Creek Reservoir It marks the 
ninth annual Sunflower Show- 
down, and the Jayhawks might 
be favored to win this one. said 
coach Patrick Sweeney. 



"KU has got a strong team 
this year" Sweeney said. "On 
the varsity side, they've beaten 
us at Iowa and Oklahoma. So, 
one would say that on paper 
they're favored" 

Although the Jayhawks are 
favored to win, K-State leads 
tile series with five wins in the 
past nine meetings. 

Senior Megan Hauver, port/ 
starboard for the squad, said the 

Sri* on the team always look 
irward to competing against 
Kansas. 

"I think it excites us, and we 



look forward to beating our in- 
state rivals," Hauver said 

K-State might be familiar 
with its competition, but they 
will be rowing in a side-to-side 
race format for the first time 
this season. 

In a side-to side race, (he 

teams compete directly against 

one another in a 2,000 meter 

nt t compared to the usual 

4,000 meter races. 

Despite ihe different racing 
format, the team has continued 
to focus on the technical aspect 
of rowing, said Heather Hoff- 



man, freshman on the novice 
squad. 

"We basically have contin- 
ued to work on the same tilings, 
technical things," Hoffman said 
"We will just carry over what 
we've teamed. If we do that, we 
should be able to compete" 

Sweeney begs to differ. He 
said the different format has 
disrupted his team's condition- 
ing because they are racing. 

"To be honest with you, this 
race gets in the way of that a 
little bit The 2K race, it's a bit 
of a hiccup," Sweeney said. 



Although the altered for- 
mat has presented an obstacle. 
Hauver said she thinks the team 
will come out on top Saturday 

"1 expect some pretty tough 
competition We've been pretty 
close in the past two races," 
Hauver said. "I don't know if 
we will sweep them in all of the 
races, but I think we will get 
the majority of them" 

The first boats will leave the 
dock at 8:30 a.m. K-State will 
have six boats competing in the 
regatta, while the Jayhawks will 
bring seven to the Showdown. 




Clary 




Friday, Nov. 11,2005 

SPORTS 
ONLINE 

Ihe men's and women's cross ." 
country teams are heading to Iowa City, 
la., on Saturday to compete in the NCAA 
Midwest Regional* To read on, go lo 
www. kitatetoliegion. com. 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

CFB | Clary Named 
Academic All-District 

K-State senior offensive lineman 
leromey Clary has been selected to 
the 2005 ESPN 
The Magazine 
Academic 
All-District 
7 football 
second team, 
selected by the 
College Sports 
Information 
Directors of 
America, the 
organization 
announced Wednesday. 

The nomination is the first to the 
academic all district team for Clary, 
who is also a two time Academic 
All -Big 12 honoree, possesses a 14 1 
G PA. in psychology and is on track to 
graduate from K-State In December 

Regarded as one of the top often 
srve tackles in the Big 1 2 Conference, 
Clary will make his 36th straight 
start for the Wildcats Saturday at 
Nebraska 



The Associated Press 

MLB | Carpenter wins ML Cy 
Young Award 

Chris Carpenter won the National 
League Cy Young Award on Thursday. 

After going 
21-5wrtha283 
ERA for the St 
Louis Cardinals, 
he received 
19 of ii first 
place votes and 
finished with 
U2 points in 
balloting by the 
Baseball Writers 
Association of 
America 

He beat out fionda lefty Dontrelle 
Willis, becoming the first Cardinals 
pitcher to claim the honor since Hall of 
Famer Sob Gibson in WO 



NFL | Bloch to decide if 
Eagles were unreasonable 

Richard Bloch is an arbitrator, 
i premium public speaker for hire, 
a Washington 
Redskins season 
ticket holder and 
a magician by 
hobby. 

Bloch will 
decide very 
soon whether 
lerrelt Owen', 
will disappear or 
reappear with 
the Philadelphia 
Eagles and the NFL 

Bloch is the arbitrator who, on 
Nov. IS will hear the NFL Players 
Association grievance that, on Owens' 
behalf, claims the Eagles have improp 
eriy suspended the receiver for four 
games under the "conduct detrimental 
to the team" clause In his contract 
In addition, the union will claim that 
additional punitive action announcing 
that Owens would not be allowed to 
play another game this season also Is 
excessive 



NFL | Football set to return 
to Los Angeles 

Paul Tagliabue said rhr NFL and 
city officials hive reached a preliminary 
agreement on terms to bring a team 
back to the Los Angeles Coliseum. 

The Los Angeles area, the second 
largest television market in the country, 
has been without a team since 1 995 . 



GLF | Tiger mixes 10 birdies, 
three bogeys 

Tiger Woods bogeyed his last hole 
after hitting a tee shot into a bunker, 
costing him a 
share of the 
first-round lead 
Thursday in the 
SS million HSBC 
Champions 

Scotland's 
Paul Uwrle, the 
1999 British Open 
winner; England's 
Nick Dougherty 
and Australia's 

Peter 0'Malley led at (-under par 54 
Woods was at 65 with England's David 
Howell, the Netherlands' Robert Ian 
Oerksen and South Koreas X J. Choi 



Carpenter 




Owens 




Woods 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Dressing 



your 




Winter brings changes to footwear 




By Eileen Latin 
KANSAS M/MCOllf GUN 



w 



Ufa winter ap- 
proaching, ap 
propriate foot' 
wear is changing Boots, 
flats and tennis shoes are be- 
ginning to gain popularity, post 
flip flops and sandals. 
I)r Michael Hamler, chiropractor at the Al- 
ternative Healthcare Center, said he had a patient 
who had plantar Fasciitis, which is burning ami 
ing on the bottom of the feet 

!(' -lid she was a runner and was wearing old 
which lend to wear down the sole or weaken 
ten with lime 
"If the arches are bad, then that can harm the bal- 
pelvis," he said. "Everything has to bal- 
ance with everything else and work together Your 
pelvis, km I inkles all have to work together to 

you walk and run successfully." 
1 1, ii nli r laid ilu must important thing about choos 
impropriate lootwear is paying attention to how 
much it is worn 

Dn will not hurt anything! though it may 

i If they arc being worn ev 

■ind every day, he said 
I le shouldn't panic if they want to wear dress 
iu pmbahh just shouldn't get into a running 
rain and wear them ' he said 

DRESSY 

Barry l*ugh, store manager for Journeys in 
Manhattan Town Center, said heets are still popular 
for women. 

rid Playhouse arc all brands 
thai an- pi Lilar watoenh dress shoes," he said 

Most of the heels tome in different colors, usually 
id black and sometimes white. Plats, clogs 
rind ■ i ilar for women, he said 

Cindy Kulp, district manager at The Buckle in the 

Manhattan Town Center, said men have choices at the 

when choosing dress shoes 

"We have the low profile tennis shoe which is 

brown leather, BS well as a shoe that is an updated 



loafer," she said. 

CASUAL 

Casual sin a- lahle al (lhjiihv'- and 

Buckle Both stores carry Puma, which Kulp said it 
coming back strong for the winter 
vintage tennis shoe look in many colors, 

"Bonis are very in rigji 

nd Nordic hoots, or tony boots, I jj 
you could call them Harness bo i popular 

choice for men.' 

Wedge moccasins and re trend) 

can be casual as well as dri 

Pugh said l> ire been a popular pick toi 

men and wonn 

Puma are also popi I !..irtm sh< 

said. t. (inverse is another shoe that is coming back 
and gaining popularity. I 'ugh said 
■iiversc is good because It it 
in many differ I 

ATHLETIC 

lames White, junior in interior architecture and 

part tune fcr in the Man- 

hattan Town Center said lb. pea of 

shoes that are hoi right 111 

Nike Shox, Air |oraans and Ail ' been the 

popular styles for men in terms of athletic wear For 
(he more casual look. Iu said K-Swiss Reebok I 
sid Timberlands- have also been selling well 

"I know that Air Force Ones ate Mill poputai 
though they came out a few but we don't 

carry them righi n kid. 

Scott V lie, in; managi uj director for Finish I 
said some of the more popular styles are the Nike 
ShOJI and the Maddia Collection ! 
at Finish Line The collection fea ordinatlng 

wear, apparel and accessories, he said. 

'Some companies have different 
styles," he said I im 

pic, many companies ^pfe 

are coming 
out with rciro 
styles because 

it is becoming 

and more 
popular" 






Dealing with roommates has positive, negative sides 



Ask the 




year 



MATT 

PETERWORTH 




My roommulc is growing po( 
in our coal closet I really 
didn't mind before, but now 
that it is getting cold out and 
I'm getting into the closet 
more often, it is starling to 
bother me. What should I do? 

You don't want to ask him 
in move it because the closet 
is the best hiding place for it 
Asking him to get rid of It com- 
pletely might put a strain on 
pout relationship, As a strong 
evader of all drama, I wouldn't 
suggest that either 

No, the only way to gel rid 
ill the plant in ■ discreet man- 
ner, without offending anyone, 
is sabotage. All you need to do 
is feed the marijuana plant a 



tablespoon of bleach each week 
and it will be dead by Chi 
mas 

Of course, there's always the 
chance that he'll just put a new 
pot plant in its place In that 
case, go out and buy a couple 
of sleeping bags to put in the 
eloset right after he removes 
the dead plant 

Have you ever had a bad 
roommate? 

There are two types of 
roommates those who are 
never there and those who are 
always there. 

Unfortunately, f have had 
more than my fair share of 
roommates who were always 
there 



There was one who kept me 
up until 2 or J every morning 
playing Counter Strike I asked 
him to he quiet and all he did 
was put on his headphones 
The typing on his keyboard still 
kept me up no matter how loud 
I played my iPod There was 
definitely a link thai semester 
between a bad roommate and 
ontj passing nine hours 

There are other things to 
consider when evaluating past 
roommates. There was one 
from Marysville who lived on a 
pig farm. 

As a result, all of his stuff 
stunk up the whole room 
like pig crap Of COurae, ha 
was oblivious to the smell be 
cause he had been around it 




bis whole life, but every girl I 
brought back to the room said 
smiicihing. 

The best roommate to have 
is one that listens to the same 
kind >>l music as you and shares 
a simitar sleep pattern 

My current roommate, tech 
mcally now my housemate, 
Grant, and 1 like pretty much 
the same music, except he can't 
get behind the Doors or Bright 
Eyes Well, Grant, I can't get 
behind listening to the Taxi 
theme song four consecutive 
times 



Matt Peterworth it a fifth y*ar tenter In 
archthxtural •notewrlaf, Vm on * mall 
Mm at ed^jpebJbu.Mfe . 



Page 9 

MOVIES 

■ Times for today through Sunday. 

■ HII timet are p.m. unless other 
wive noted. 

■ () denotei timet that are playing 
Saturday and Sunday only 




"Get Rich or Die Tryin" R 

1 100). too 

"Chitfcen Little" G 
"Jarhtad" R 

The Weather Man" h: 

1 1:40), 4 IS 




"The Legend of Zono" PC 

l):00U0O ' 

•Prime' PGU 

I 

-Saw2"R 
(1:101.(1*0 




Courlevy art 



"Dreamer* PG 

I11SU20, 7:10, 9:15 

"Ooom'R 

'MO 

"North Country" R 

7:00, 9:50 

"iltzabethtown 
(1:201 I 'H:00 




Courtesy art 

"Wallace and Groin it Curse of the 
Were Rabbit" S 

(14Si, 4 10 

Tathora* (Hi 

(1:00i. MIS), 5:30, 7 45, 10:00 



TOP 20 
ARTISTS 



I Black tyed Peas 
2, Green Day 

I. SO Cent 

4 Fall Out Boy 

5.KellyCldf»son 

6 My Chemical Romance 

7. NotortoiB BIG 

8 Lindsay Lohan 

9. Madonna 

10 Gwen Stefan! 

II. Kan 
12. On 

U Eminem 

14 Flow Wow 

15 Avril laviqnc 

16 Simple Plan 
17. Marian Catey 
IB. Linkm Park 

19. Ashlee Simpson 
20 Bntney Spears 

Source: MTV 



Wmmmmmm 



raMaMa-MaafaiMM 



A 



wmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



Lackluster 
nutrition 

Students miss out 
on fruits, veggies 



By Abby Brown back 

KANSASSTANCOUfGIAN 

Milk, pizza, cheese, eggs, cab- 
bage, m>v sauce and pre made 
hamburger patties fill Bryan 
Watts* refrigerator. 

Watts, senior in chemical en- 
gineering, said he buys gfOCCfiei 
based on taste and what is quick 
and easy to cook 

McgM Mt-Call sophomore 
in pre professional elementary 
education said slu keeps frozen 
vegetables, soup, turkey, peanut 
butter and jelly on hand. 

Deborah Canter, head of the 
department of hotel, restaurant, 
institution management and 
dietetic*, said a typical student 
diet sounds devoid of fresh fruits 
and vegetables and the vitamins 
and minerals they eontain. 

Fiber is also missing in this 
high -fat, high sodium diet. Can- 
ter said But pizza can have 
some redeeming value, she said, 
if it's Hawaiian or vegetarian. 

The selection in a college stu- 
dent 's diet is often based on cost 
and convenience, said Mark 
Haub, assistant professor of hu- 
man nutrition. 

"They may be neglecting 
some of the nutrients that can 
be found in fruits and vegeta- 
bles." he said 

It is hard to tell if there are 
any long-term consequences to 
eating a somewhat unbalanced 
diet for four years 

"Given their age, most tend 
to not have clinical problems," 
Haub said 

The "freshman 15" weight 
gain does occur, he said, but 
effects of a university diet are 
often not noticeable since stu 
dents graduate and begin a real 
job with a real paycheck" that 
allows them to purchase a more 
balanced variety of foods. 

Andrew Trent, senior in pre* 
professional secondary educa- 
tion, said cost is a factor in what 
groceries he buys. 

If something's on sale, I'm 
probably going to lean toward 
that," he said 

But time may be an even 
bigger factor in Trent's diet he 
said 

"I'm definitely short the 
fruits and vegetables a lot of the 
time, and that's a time issue, but 
I make a concerted effort to bal- 
ance it." he said. 

Trent's refrigerator is filled 
with hot dogs, pears, apple- 
sauce, eggs, chocolate milk, 
pizza, salsa, lunch meat, carrots, 
grapes and cheese 

He said he rotates his dinner 
entrees between about six items, 
including hamburgers, chili and 
spaghetti. He said he would like 
to diversify his main courses 
and make them more healthy 

McCall said she would like 
to eat more men 

"My roommates are kind of 
vegan, so I'd like to get some 
more meat," she said "1 feel like 
when I was at the Dcrb I had a 
lot more choices" 

Jeremy Roberts, senior in 
speech, said if cost and time 
weren't factors, he also would 
like to incorporate more meat 




Canadian playwright tells story 
of new beginnings, strange occurrences 



For a more balanced diet: 

■ Fuji apples: 86 cents/pound 

■ Sara Lee whole wheat bread; 

$ua/iMf 

■ fresh Express 16 oi. bagged 
lettu«:two baqs$J 

■ Oieeriw: $2 V M 28/box, depending 
on type and sire 

■ Deli turkey: $2,98 SS.Wpound 
Source: Wal-Mart, 101 E. Bluemont Aye. 

into his diet. He said he doesn't 
have time to make special trips 
to the grocery store to buy fresh 
meat, and he doesn't plan meals 
ahead of time in order to thaw 
frozen meat. 

"Eight out of the last 1 meals 
we ve had were pasta, and it's 
different each time," Roberts 
said 

He and his roommates fix 
community meals, which are 
often pasta with homemade 
sauce, with cheese or with any 
number of different additions 
rYotOI pizza is also a staple. 

"When frozen pizzas are on 
sale for $3, we buy as many as 
we can," Roberts said "We look 
for the clearance stuff" 

Watts, on the other hand, 
said he incorporates meat into 
his diet in the mornings, with 
breakfasts like a chicken and 
vegetable omelet His lunches 
are often leftovers, he said, and 
dinners are pasta and whatever 
else is in his refrigerator, 

Sandy Procter, associate spe- 
cialist in human nutrition for K- 
Statc Research and Extension. 
said most Americans get enough 
protein in their diets through 
sources like cheese, eggs and 
milk. She said students may not 
perceive chicken nuggets or fast- 
food tacos as sources of protein, 
but they are 

"A lot of what wc purchase 
on the fly is going to be a pro 
tein source," Procter said 

Students may not purchase 
traditional meats, Procter said, 
because they think it is difficult 
to prepare and expensive 

She said bean burritos, om- 
elets and shelf-stable cans of 
tuna or chicken that can be com 
bined with casseroles, macaroni 
and cheese or ram en noodles all 
make easy, inexpensive sources 
of protein 

"It might not show up as it 
would in their parents' refrig- 
erators, but for the most part, 
protein is usually very plentiful 
in the typical American diet," 
Procter said 

Dianna Schalles, nutritionist 



at I.afene Health Center, said 

students need more U an pro- 
teins in their diets 1 tiev can get 
those through bean-. 
meats, low- fat dairy products 
and homemade trail mi 

Canter said students can 
ily increase their fruit and veg 
stable consumption bj pi 
up a bag of apples or a I 
pre cut. pre washed vegetables, 
like lettin. e 

"Fresh fruits are nature's fast 
foods," Schalles said 

Taking a vitamin or mineral 
supplement ean llto help round 
out a student's diet, Canter said. 

Students can get more fiber 
through whole grains like 
als, Schalles said I town er, they 
need to read ingredient labels 
and make sure 'whole wheal," 
"brown rice" or "whole oats" 
are toward the lop of the list. 

A lack of fiber can cause 
constipation in the long-term, 
Schalles said. 

Eating a balanced diet will 
help maintain a student's en- 
ergy level and immune system. 
which is important as the se- 
t progresses Canter said 

"If you're not really eating a 
bafuieed diet, you might be put- 
ling yourself at rtsk for catching 
colds and flu," she s.nd 
sort of end up paying the piper 
later" 

But the key to a balanced 
diet is simple. 

"Variety and moderation are 
the two things wc look at across 
the board," Cantos said "We re- 
ally would probably do better 
if we kept those two words in 
mind." 



By Adrtanne DeWeese 

KANMSSIATKOLliGlAN 

A thriller about strange 
events in the Maine countryside 
opens tonight at the Manhattan 
Arts Center 

ill Be Back Before Mid- 
night," written by Canadian 
playwright Peter C alley, is 
not well-known in the United 
States, but is often performed in 
Canada, director Michael Park- 
er said. 

The four-actor play tells the 
story of a husband and wife who 
move to the country to rekindle 
their relationship after the wife 
has a nervous breakdown. 

fan and Greg Sanderson, 
played by Rebecca Butler and 
Scott Mulryan, respectively, see 
strange events at their farm- 
house, and |an appears to go 
insane. 

Other characters in the play 
include Greg's sister, played by 
K-State senior in English and 
journalism education, Amy Ep- 
perly, and George Willoughby, 
played by Manhattan resident 
Phil Pugh, 

Butler, graduate student in 
speech, said it has been difficult 
playing a character different 
from herself. 

"It's been challenging trying 
to create a full and believable 
character who is separate from 
•If," she said. "The play aho 
has a lot of (wtsts and surprises, 
which the audience will enjoy" 

Mulryan, senior in theater, 
described his character Greg as 
an archeologist who has moved 
to the country lo rebuild his re- 
lationship with fan. 

"Greg cares about his wife, 
but he gets very blind lo what 
she is going through because 
he's very into his work and rec- 
reational activities," Mulryan 
said, 

The positives of portraying 




Trying to calm 
down his wife 
during the 
final dress re- 
hearsal of "I'll 
Be Back Before 
Midnight," 
Greg Sander- 
son, played 
by senior in 
theater Scott 
Mulryan, 
speaks with 
Jan Sander- 
son, played by 
graduate stu- 
dent in speech 
Rebecca 
Butler, 



Joslyn Brown 
COtLfGIAN 



Til Be Back Before 
Midnight' 

When: 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday and 
Nov. 17-19; 2 p.m Nov. Hand 20 
Where: Manhattan Am (enter, 1S20 Ave. 
How much: S 1 2 for adults, $10 for mili- 
tary, $9 for students, SS for children 
For more information, call 537-4420. 



Greg are the energy and move- 
ment through the play, Mulryan 
said 



"The audience will gel involved 
in the show" he said "They'll 
be wondering what's around 
the next corner and what's go- 
ing to happen next " 

Parker said students and the 
community will enjoy the psy- 
chological scare aspect of the 
play 

"There aren't too many thrill- 
ers performed around here, and 
everybody likes to be scared 
and thrilled," he said 

"Seeing the stuff live brings a 
whole new aspect to it " 



advertise with the 

COLLEGIAN 

532-6560 




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Student cuts $7.95 



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3035 Anderson & 431 E. Poyntz 

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KSU Theatre & Dance and 
the Department of Musk 

Present 



S 



Pregnancy 
Testiiiii Center 



"Supportive services for 

pregnancy, parenting & 

adoption," 



the musical 




gnancy testing 
fidentiaJ service 
day results 
appointment 



looted man from ampmn AndtrmVll 



Mon.-Fri, 9 a.m. -5 p m 



November 1 7-1 9 at 8 p.m. 
November 20 at 3 p.m. 

, McCain Auditorium 



boot 

Hifjon 

Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public; $13.50 



( andlyn 
Stephen Schwartz 



C (ea*> ( . 



3 






McCain Box Office 
532-6428 weekdays 



www.ksu.edu/' 



We can't get you girls. 



We can't get you beer or cigarettes. W1 m V J ^ m 

You won't be any cooler. 

You won't be more attractive. 



You won't be 

ini 



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smarter, 

or suddenly wealthy. 



■tt I ' ur suuueniy weaiuiy. 

DUt maybe, just maybe, 

you'll get the experience you need to land a job 
that CAN get you those things.. .after college. 

The Kansas State Collegian is looking tor people who ai >how initiative, and are ueatw 

if this description ffe you, please apply. I .ippkation and/or job descript v 



In Kwfcfe 103, The follow* 



The foflowirv: .attabk-; 

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Get tta experience you Hl&. 

KANSAS STATE 



art •« 5 pm Net & 







CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



1501 



I I I I 



II III 



II II 

s: u «J 



■ 1 1 it 



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■ 

■I'leralor. 
H S675 (785,537- 
9425 or (785)532-4424. 



1451 

Roommate 
Wanted 

MALE ROOMMATE needed 
tor three bedroom house 
$200' month, ne.it lo cam- 
pus, washer/ dryer Availa- 
ble now (913)579-2209 

Roommates needed lor 
tour bedroom next to cam- 
put. Two bath, washer/ dry- 
er, dishwasher No pets 
(785)537-7050 



Sublease 

FEMALE SUBLEASEH 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please Oonlacl 1785)556 
0189 

ROOMMATES MALE Or 
female pets okay Rent no 
gotiabie Washer/ dryer. 
large yard one-third utilities 
Call James (785)31 7-5006 

SPRING SEMESTER sub- 
leaser(s) needed Ni< I 
clean apartment Close to 
campus and An 
Cheap bills No deposil 
Discounted rent: $225/ 
month Call (485)202-0678 
Av iii.ir>i'- Daoarnbei 



1451 



For Rent- 
Houses 




Shout 






HICK I love you mi- 



A shout out to my 
Fovety Bfug Phi nw - 
t»sl Ir.ti at K- Slate 

I GIVE aihoutoul lo 
Mnurice Rickey, Justin alt 

antara 

mahtv QflAS .....'i.'.ij 
soon t' Mi near 

you 1 

TO MV SwaelbultarMy Brian 



STOP HITTING on our stats 
professor, you know who 
you are 9:05 on Monday. 
Wednesday is loo early lo 
fWi" 

TMF LADIES ot Alpha Kap- 
bn Alpha are the best' Keep 

... r, ,n 

to rt-it 

Ihe union that alwa, 

the hat, stop by arid give me 

atlp 



TO THE cute boy in my hu 
man sexuality class we 
should study together. 6th 
floor Hate, 10pm 

TO THE guy with ihe pretty 
brown eyas I so admire 
you Holla at me 

UP 'TIL dawn is the 

ever Vou will be too it you 

join i 

WHAT* IfPHi.i rt,„- - 
i"ETAS ARE hot! hi 



Roommate 

Wanted 

FFMAIF ROOMMATE 

wanted Three -bedroom 
apartment hall block from 
campus $250' month plus 
one-third utilities Call 
(7851342 1554 

FEMALE ROOMMATE r*i 

smoking TWQ PfMh " 

apartment Close to cam 
pus Ott street i 
Washer/ dryer Available im 
mediately (620)481 9837 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
Ihrsebedroom house for 
spring semester Rent $320 
plus utilities Very nice 
house (316)990-2046 

NICE BRICK home Wash- 
er/ dryer walk lo class 
porch, storage three female 
roommates $?/s rani no 
bills Available January 
(785)443-2229 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
January 1. for two-bedroom 
hause three blocks irom Ag- 
gieuilln Walk to campus 
Rem $300 Call (913)219- 
7801 or (913)638-2323 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
$350 one halt utilities Scott 
[785|34t-5153 

SUBLEASER FOR one ot 
foui bedrooms. University 

I Begins )< 

. nthly Cable, hash. 
dryer furnished 
(316)650-6563 

WALK lo class No smoking, 
nking. no pets. 
1703)936 



SubKMM 

MALE SUBLEASE wanted 
One bedroom out of Ihree 
bedroom house Rent $300.' 
month plus utilities Avaitu 
ble second semester 
19131836 6886. 

NEED MALE or lemsle suh 
leaser December $275/ 
month plus utiklies Close lo 
campus (316)644-2118 

ONE -BED ONE both $385 
cable included Pay (or gas 
and electric CaU 1620)694 
7766 

ONE BEDROOM S3«5 ™ 
ble/ water paid Laundry/ 
pool/ hot tub on site Small 
pots Ouiel Available now 
(786)375 3015 

ROOM AVAILABLE from 

1st Wast« . 
Near CHI month 

(6 20 )560-301 T 

SUBLEASER NEEDED lor 
January ( Spacious one 
bedroom, close lo 
Aggieville (785)564 713-1 

SUBLEASER NEEDED lor 
spring gamester One bed- 
room, one bathroom aparl- 
ment, near campus $450/ 
monlh plus elect' i 
Caroline (785)564-1284 

SUBLEASER WANTED 

■ ■ 
room apartment hv- 
nam campus $250/ monlh 

■684? 

SUBLEASFRIS) NEEDED 
One block Irom i 
Water/ ttash paid Washer/ 
dryer included Wut 

Call 
(318I2BH 

TWO- BEDROOM SPA* 
CIOUS apartment sublease 
January 1- May 31 $285/ 
person Dishwasher central 

iiuc mirtui 

lo union (7651537 6880 




An no iince merits 



Li ANN Tt 
Ptiflfi 

'.an 

rtSVW ■ 



For Rent 
Apts. Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 saaurni every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account of race, 
MM, familial status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age. color, national 
origin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources al City Hall, 
1785)587-2440 

1101 

For Rem 
Apt 

Uniumtstiri'd 






BO 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt 
Untarnished 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM 
walking distance from cam. 
pus W ,-,n paid 

Lease stuns 

. sooner (785)6?2- 
2317 

ONE BEDROOM APART 

available now and 

in January Offering somes 

awa. can mdi at 

I '"851 776-3B04 

TWO OR ir ' bedroom 

close lo campus Spacious, 
central jh dishwasher, 
laundry facility Water and 
trash paid 1785)539-0866 

1201 
For Rent 



m 908 Valuer $750 
'86)313' 



ONE BEDROOM WALK lc 
class No smoking. 8 
ing. no pels { I 
t554 

THREE-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath, house across from 
campus Modern apphan 
ces. central air. very clean 
Available immediately $350 
per bedroom plus utilities 
1735 Anderson Call KSU 
Foundation at (78S)532 
7569 <n (785)532-7541 



as and Found 



loaI and found ads can be 
placed tree for thraa days. 



NOW LEASING 



PoBtaNota 



We ranuire a form ot pic- 
ture ID (KSU, driver's li- 
cense or other l when plac- 
ing a post a note. 



100 



i/iootn Apis."" 

■ 
■ 



5379064 



Have you 

lost or 

found a pet? 



JANUARY I 
rooms $335 
(785)587 0399 



n:. pan 



MONTH month Leases. 
Two-bedroom $520 Three 
10 Col 
teti» Ave (78M5J7 2096 

THREE AND four bedroom 
i no drinking, no 




I 




Let us help 

you find 

the . 

Place an ad in 
the classifieds. 

Kansas Sihe Colle('.l v\ 

lOJKedne SJ2 6555 



For Sale- 
Houses 

LAKE HOUSE two stones, 

1 700 square feet 
rJeeV .mil HRMMd P0B1 

sand beach, boa I ramp 

greal viewi $i 



Campus 

Phone 
Book 

Get it 



Sublease 

$385' MONTH Lh 
dossing Cable, washer' 
dryer, lurnished One bed- 
room open i. 

mi Please call 
(9131909-5448 

AGGIEVILLE LOFT Lease 
nuary- August 2008 
Four -bedroom iw. 
room new carpet $350/ 
monlh Moore Property 
Management (78 

FEMAUJ SUBLEASER 

wanted for spnng semester 

One -half b(0'> 

pus $275 AH utilities paid 

Call Ashley al (316)258 

7768 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted. Great apa-i- 
Wildcat 

h.UP.;/f*wta .. viH a.gt- 
'wPtflfit wt ij $350' month 
plus one-third electric and 
water Washer rjtyw in unit. 
■ ■ 



FEMALE SUBLEASEn 

I Three bkx* 
campus/ tout Iron' 
villa IrVaartori dry* 
month ;■ • utilities 

Call (785)287 5364 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

*.ii i. .i Walun i (Man ■ u 

campus Large room $300 
plus one third utilities Avail 
able immediately 




310 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty Ihe financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career elaaslti- 
cation. Readers ar« ad- 
vised lo approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity wllh reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson. 
Topeka. KS 66607-1190 
1785)232-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any Held ot 
work or labor for which 
ha/ she Is properly quali- 
fied regardless ot race, 
set, military status, disa 
bihty religion, age. color, 
national origin oi ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to Ihe Director of 
Human Resources al City 
Hall, 1785)587-2441 

'BARTENDING' $300 a day 
potential No e«; - 
necessary Training provid 




MS credit working with the ad design/production staff on 
the Kamas State Collegian during spring semester 2006. Limited 
enrollment. The instructor's petmission is reguired. No prereguiMtes 
are necessary. Stop by 111 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. for an 
application Application deadline is Friday. Nov. 18. 



Graphic Design Internship 



Advertising Design 



Kansas State Collegian 



<p If you are a graphic design major and would like an 
on campus spring 2006 internship for credit, stop by for 
an application. Your art department adviser's permission 
is required Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 18. 



Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. 
for more information. 



NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR MACTECHS 

Student Publications Inc. at Kansas State University is accepting applications for a 
part-time position for Macintosh technicians beginning the first week of January 
2006. 

The tech support team maintains about 50 Macintosh workstations, providing 
software jupport as well as performing ijeneral hardware maintenance. 
Applicants should have experience with Mac OS X, OS X Server and its server 
administration software. Experience in any or all of the following is a plus: 
Radmind, Shell scripting and general troubleshooting ability along with 
knowledge of MySQL, PHP, and the Apache web server. 

Pay starts at $7.50 per hour with the opportunity to advance. Only students 
enrolling in spring semester 2006 for at least six hours at Kansas State 
University can be considered, 

Applications are available in 113 or 115 Kedzie or online at 
http://spub.ksu.edu/tech/application.html. 

Application deadline is 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18, 2005. Please include your spring 
2006 class schedule. Return applications to 113 Kedzie. 



Help Wanted 



ECONOMIC DEVELOP 
MF N T Coordinator Full 
time position available in 

based upon axparMnea For 

complete position desenp- 

IM contact WCED 

al 1785)785 465?. Applita 

:,i rJmJUtii uuMimwl by 

Novnmber 21 Please send 

iivt resume to 

or email to 
wu'dciS Kansas, net 

GET PAID lo drive a brand 

new car' tMnw p.iying driv- 
ers $800 $3200 a month 
■»xir tree tar Key lo 

wtrwt JTtocarhey .com 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAY- 

GROUND Supervisors- 
Hall Monitors r mdad im 
Iho 2005 2008 school year 
$t» 50 pur hour one and 
ma-haft pat day 

■ii I 00 p m Apply 
lo USD 383 2031 Poynu 
Hv« M 118502 

I/B5I5K .al Op- 

portunity Employer 

OUTBOUND SALES Civ 
icPius is the nation's leader 
in producing t.uslom -de- 
signed local govurnmeni 
websites. Currently we are 
Nrmg part-time and ' 

latl to assist 
in our sales efforts Must be 
a motivated self starter with 

iimmunication skills 
Base wage plus bonuses 

ihoul $18/ hour or 
higher Email resume In 

omot Wort n IM taftn i 
Equal Opportunity I 

i." 

PflOGTIAMMEn CIVIC 
. lull-time 
programmer Mi 

ASP NET and SOL expert- 
i $ 1 4 50/ hour 
>-m.nl fWWM iri MiCfOSOft 

Word or text format to 

Bta'g'OYJOIIUkr.-.'n-: 

RETAIL SALES d i„ 
lion available at McMillin s 
I muiit Apply in pan 
930 Hayes f 
Must be able lo work eve 
megs and weekends 

ROVAL PURPLE YEAR- 
BOOK Staff It looking lit! a 
mttiMttng assistant ' . hi i 
design promotional material 
assist wllh yearbook sales 
•ii ipato in marketing 
ticlivities Work on sal ary lo 
l.flLi , I 

award-winning yearbook 
ten hours/ week Start im 
■ -V Call Urxl 
i785)53!-6557 lor 
mort? information 

STUDENT NEEDING ride 
home occasionally lo Par 
*nekends Will 
share expenses |620)42i 
SOW 

riir WOMEN'S Heallh 
is seeking a 
I Laboratory Techm 
nil Clinic Lab Man- 
ager position 

- lam/aiionai skids a 
ahituda, and team 

building skills tt is preferred 
thai tartdidates havr> prmr 

lab iririM i.j eipad- 

■ 
should subrtnl resun 

trator. 1820 Charles 
Manhattan, KS 
66502 No phone calls 
please 




3301 

Business 
Opportunities 

The Collegian cannot vert 
ry MM financial potential ot 
advertisements in Ihe Em 
ploymenl/Csrwr classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad 
vised to apptosch any 
such business opportunl 
ty wllh leaaonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
50 1 SE Jatferson. Topeka. 
KS 66607 1190 |785|232 
04S4 




410 



Items for Sale 






become a senuni 
- 

Call (7851341 -5394 

Mm 

4201 

Garage/Yard 

Sales 



MOVING SALE Dorm re 

tainment center recfiner 

while iv 

lore. sewing m 

■ i mnr.. 
Saturday 7 30 It al 1612 

[ tl-amivtirtati on 



5101 



Automobiles 

1998 DODGE Neon while 
two-door live- speed air 
ung dependable 
transom' 
new dnvpi or work 

75k asking $3000 

|7BS)5B stalls 



Motorcycles 

1994 NINJA 600 lour -cylm 

000 mile* 
and Hires pipe $2000. firm 
14 1 -6972 




630 



Spnng 
Break 

RING Bre.ii 
utai Law prices guaranteed 
Book i( people get Kit. 
tnp tree' Group discounts lor 
plus 
www.Spr1n9.Biea.kDil- 
counis. 11 www.Lei- 

•uioTouri.som or 

(8001838-8202 



SPHING BREAK 

Hi., k.ng spa - I R( ( 

I -O De 
posit- (800123- 

W.VA —HI— MMf— a*— c 

om 




sudoku 



Fill in the grid so that every row. 

everj column, md every 3 x 3 box 

Ltintains the digits I ihrtiugh 9 

with no repeats. 



8 5 
4 


6 
3 


1 


9 


2 


3 


s 7 

2 


4 


9 


7 
6 


6 
7 


6 


9 


2 






7 


5 




1 


3 


9 6 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



l.rini» ill puzzle 
and receive KRKK chips 

and small drink. 

milli |)lll(llilM' nl ,lll\ M/l Milt I 



Deadline* 

OssstM ads must be 
placnJ hj noon the day 
betotv you want your ad 
to run. OassiTiftl display 
ads must be placed by 
4 p,m two awking days 
pnot to the date you want, 
your ad tu run. 

CALL 532-6555 



ClassidedRATES 

1DAY 

20 words or less 

S6.S0 

each word over 20 

20e per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words ot toss 
SS96 

'i word ovei 20 
per wwd 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$1165 

each word over 20 

30c per word 

4 DAYS 

20 woids or less 
$1290 

2D 

per word 

5 DAYS 
20 wo I 

$M I 
each word over ?0 
40c per word 
( consecutive day rale ) 



TO PLACE AN AD 

Go to Keclzie I 
(across irotn Ihe 
K- Stale Student Union). 

Ollice houis are 

Monday through Friday 

Irom Bam to 5 p.m. 

The office is open 

except on holidays 



HOW TO PAY 

All classifieds must be 

paid m advance unless 

vou have an account 

wild Sludenl 

Cash, check. 

accepted There is a 
$10 service char qe on 

all relumed Cno 
We reserve the right to 
edit, retecl or properly 
caasstry V, 



FREE FOUND ADS 

j. we 
run to) ■ 'nree 

day- .rge 

CORRECTIONS 
II you find an error in 
your ad plfMM cjII us 
Wc- accept responsi- 
bility only I or the first 
wrong insedion 



CANCELLATIONS 
tain 

beii- ;>as 

expired M will refund 
you lor the femaming 
days You must call us 
belore noon the day 
before the ad is lo be 
pyblished. 



HEADLINES 

for an extra charge. 
wt>ll pu! a heatHine 

vow 30 to catch 
thereafter'- ^Mention. 



000 

H htiltt-iii 





-gg" 








■aajaMkjaaatj 



^^. 



wmmmmmm 



Page 1 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 11,2005 



FAMILY | Boos, Vondemkamp get 
help from friends with 3-month-old 



Continued (ram Page 1 

For diapers, Boos and Vondem- 
kamp clip coupons. 

"It helps save a couple of dol- 
lars," Vondcinl:amp said. 

UNPLANNED BLESSING 

Buns and Vondemkamp were 
dating each other when they 
found out Vondcmkamp was 
pregnant with Ethan. 

"It wasn't planned, it just hap 
pened," Vondemkamp said "But 
I don't regR'i it" 

However, Vondemkamp said 
she wondered how her parents 
would react 

"I come from a pretty conser- 
vative Catholic family," she said 
"I didn't know what they would 
say, but my parents are really sup- 
portive" 

Friends were also supportive 
and Boos said they sometimes of- 
fer 10 lu-lp with babysitting. 

Not everyone is as understand - 
Ing, Vondemkamp said 



"People sometimes think it's 
your mistake, you weren't be- 
ing careful, or if you're a young 
mother you are promiscuous," 
she said. 

Although Boos and Vondem- 
kamp are engaged, they are not 
only getting married because of 
Ethan, Vondemkamp said. The 
couple got engaged last May, 

Now that he is a parent, Boos 
said he has a new outlook on 
life. 

"Before Ethan, I'd go out three 
nights, four nights a week you 
know and get pretty drunk," Boos 
said "Having Ethan made me 
realize there arc more important 
things to life than having fun." 

Despite the challenges of be- 
ing a young parent, Boos and 
Vondemkamp said they want 
people to be happy for them and 
their family 

"1 don't want people to feel 
pity for us," Boos said "He's a 
blessing I wouldn't have it any 
other way " 



SECURITY | Program designed 
to allow people to avoid delays 



Continued from Page 1 

aviation security as well," Haw- 
ley told the House Homeland 
Security subcommittee on eco- 
nomic security last week. 

The program is designed to 
let people avoid security check 
delays and to allow screeners to 
focus on other at-risk travelers, 
said Chris Harding, customer 
service representative of TSA 
Wichita Mid-Continent Air- 
port 

Orlando International Air- 
port head and Court TV found- 
er Steven Brill told the Senate 
subcommittee that 10,000 fre- 
quent travelers have paid nearly 
$80 to join the program 

Screenings lasted an average 
of four seconds for registered 
travelers The average total wait 
time (or registered travelers was 
three minutes, compared to the 
much longer regular wait time 
of 31 minutes, 48 seconds, Brill 
said. 



"You know, a program like 
this seems reasonable, if you're 
willing to cough up the 80 
bucks," Wichita resident Drew 
Patterson said. "It'd be a pretty 
sweet deal to brush through se- 
curity and not have to worry, at 
least for people who frequent 
airports constantly." 

While some people may slide 
through security faster upon 
launch of the program, groups 
like the American Civil Liberties 
Union said il forces passengers 
to give up personal information 
for a little convenience. 

ACLU legal counsel Timo- 
thy Sparapani said this is also 
an opportunity for terrorists to 
learn if they are on any security 
watch lists. 

"Those who don't want to 
give up this information - or 
who can't afford the costs - will 
have to deal with other airport 
screening lines growing expo- 
nentially longer," Sparapani told 
to the Associated Press, 



CONTEST | Wildcat cheerleader 
represents K-State in online competition 



Continued from Page 1 

and Athlon Sports chose Lair. 

This is Lair's second year on 
the squad. 

"She's got a great person- 
ality," he said. "She's athletic. 
She's talented " 

Both Lair and Entow said 
Lair's participation in the con- 
test is good for K-State 

"Cheerleading in Kansas 
isn't as big as it is in other 
places," Lair said. "It'll open 
people's eyes that we do have a 
good program here" 

Kelly Dupree, a University 
of Kentucky cheerleader who 
currently has about double 
Lair's vote total, is the face of 
Kentucky cheerleading, Lair 
said 

"I'm a little nervous," Lair 
said, "I don't know if 1 can 
handle this for three weeks." 

Kentucky is one of the big- 
gest states for cheerleading, 
Lair said, but K-State's cheer - 



I 
rerslty of 

■ 

Miami) 



Vote totals as of Thursday 

Kelly Dupree (SK, Unrversity of Ken* 

tucky): 8,711 

KelllUir {Big 12, K-SUtt); 4,373 

Jennifer Ogjetree (Big East, Univer 

Cincinnati): 2,686 

Andrea Ueglbel (Big Ten, Indiana 

University): 2,435 

Ashley White (ACC University of Mil 

1,294 

Christy Delp (PAC 10, University of 

California-Los Angeles): 119 

To vote, go to www.athlompom. 

cem/sptfit. 

leading squad has seen st 
improvement since Enlow 1 
over as coach. 

Both the women's-only and 
the coed squads will be com- 
peting in national competitions 
in spring 2006 

"I've been in love with 
K-State cheerleading since 1 
was little," Lair said. "Hopefully 
someday we can be one of the 
powerhouses for cheerleading" 





Veterans 
Day 

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/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



iMcirvr 

Sub Exp Oato 
Kansas State Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
PO Box 3585 

ta KS 6660) 



Edge, Page 5 




wwwlkstatccolIcgian.com 



Monday, November 14,2005 



Vol I Hi No 61 



NAACP, USD 383 diversity commission consider reform 



By Ka ley Lyon 

KANSAS sTAlECOUfGIAN 

Elected officials, parents, students 
and concerned citizens crowded into 
the Douglass Community Center An- 
nex, 901 Yuma, for an education town 
meeting Saturday afternoon. 

The meeting was presented by the 
National Association for the Advance 
ment of Colored People and the Man- 
hattan-Ogden Diversity Commission, 
and was titled Bridging the Achieve- 



ment Gap: Our Children... Our Com- 
munity. Our Concerns.., Our Solu- 
tions" 

An II -person panel, including USD 
383 Superintendent Bob Shannon, ad 
ministrators and educators throughout 
the district, parents and high Khool 
students, discussed topics presented by 
the audience. 

"1 don't know if anyone heard the 
sound of the children playing outside, 
but I did," David Griffin, assistant dean 
of secondary education for K-State, 



said. "And that's why we're here - In 
keep that sound alive and well" 

Ethnic achievement gaps have been 
an IMM f«>r the district since results 
from the state assessments taken din- 
ing the 2004-2005 academic year were 
: ted 

According to the Kansas Slate De- 
partment of Educalion, a considers Me 
discrepancy existed between the profi- 
ciency rates of itiulti -cultural students 

Wl hi students at Manhattan High 
School, east and west campuses 



..red i proficiency rate of 
hi SI percent African American stu 
dents received 789 percent proficiency 

and Hispanic students plated at 3 53 
nt Students of other ethnicities 
ved ■ store of 7.0ft percent profi 
ciency combined 

The USD ItO minority population is 
currently 23 percent Minority teachers 
make up 4 percent ot the staff. 5 percent 
ol administrative officials are of minor- 
ity descent, and 13 percent of classified 
emplr i iu I ti- cultural. 



Board of Education members will be 

receiving a hoard agenda fat Wednes- 
days meeting, wWci include* tuggea- 
lions in develop some ipecifu plans for 
attracting more minority students and 
(acuity to the district, Shannon said 

However, the limited ethnical divi r 
sity that exists vsitliiu the district 

iin only helot blamed for the achl 
ment gaps 

"There's another force we K not 

Set kmcf rate < 



At a loss in Lincoln 




Photos by Catrln* Rawton | ( 01 1 MAN 
K- State's Casey Hausman and Yamon Flgurs, hang their heads after the Wildcats 27 25 loss to Nebraska Saturday afternoon at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. 
With the lost, the Wildcats will not play in a post-season bowl game for a second consecutive year. 



K- State Wildcats relinquish 
4th-quarter lead, bowl bid 



By Anthony Mendou 

KANSAS SUTtLOUlCIAN 

LINCOLN, Neb - The K-State 
football team did not want to be 
linked to last years 4-7 team that 
missed a bowl game for the first lime 
in 12 seasons. They were going to be 
different, have tin ire pride and spirit 
i m and off Hie field, paying the price 
during the off season with early 
morning workouts. 

Going into the last game of the 
year at home against Missouri this 
Saturday, I hey are staring the results 
of the 2004 team directly in the face 
after their 27-25 loss to Nebraska 
eliminated them from bowl eligibility 



for Uie second straight season, and a 
4-6 record overall. 

"I don't know, 1 am not that phil- 
osophical right now," coach Bill Sny- 
der said after the game about the loss 
reflecting what the season has been 
about "We have experienced this 
before, quite obviously. 1 don't know 
if it is exactly the same way or not 
We have had some extremely disap- 
pointing losses and this is probably 
as disappointing to our players and 
coaches as any" 

Trailing 24-22, in the fourth (goat 
ler, Bryan Baldwin intercepted fresh 
man back-up quarterback Harrison 

SmFOOTBAU PageS 




Victor Mann struggles to get past Nebraska's Bo Ruud and other Nebraska 
defenders Saturday afternoon in Lincoln, Neb. Mann rushed for 32 yards 
during the Wildcats loss to the Huskers. 



By the 
numbers 



o 



K State did noHomplete a 

pass during the first half They 

finished with 103 yards passing 



108 



The number of yards K State 
was penalized They finished 

with 14 penalities. 



10 



2 



The total number of fumbles for 

both teams combined Nebraska 

had seven, and lost two. 



Number of safeties against 

Nebraska and missed PAT 

attempts by K-State 



248 



Numbet of yards K State 

finished with rushing. They had 

H4 yards in the first half. 



Postage 

stamp prices 

to increase 



By Biigett* By rand t 
HUM 

A 5.4 percent Increase in the ost dI | 
age stamps was appi ihc Postal 

Rate Cornminioi 

stamps to 39 cents lite p le will also 

increase one peine. 

Cheryl McKinnon, postmaster for Munhul- 

ud die increase m rates wis requested in 

order In itH'd I $3.1 bittJO 
which is due m 200b 

Some K state students lay the i 
price will not affect them 

■-le use stamps: lo paj iwj bills Mi I 
Golden, junior in polnu.tl science 

rodents don't List- stamps uti a rtgul 
SIS like the real world" 

Maren Taylor, junior in 
doesn't use stamp) at all 

"I pay my bills on! 

'ihi- new posts 
effecl hi January 2CH)n ti> 
creasr i in funr '■ 



Alumni rodeo 
funds club, team 



By Lola Shrtmplin 

KANSAS SWI 

The KSI! Kodeu ClQO hosted lh 
alumni rw aj in Wo- 

An auction v. Id itt R C 

All proceeds from the auction will fund 
academic and rodeo scholarships, travel ex 
peases (or the rodeo leem, purchase oi prac- 
tice stock and the K-State sponsored National 
Intercollegiate Rodeo Association rodeo 

T.lly Blast, senior in animal k tence and in- 
dustry and Miss Rodeo K Slate 2005 said the 
auction would add much needed money to 

the rodeo cluh to fund iri|^ to rodeos in the 
Central Plains Region. 

NIRA cards cost $245, and travel 

S#* HOOtO Page 6 




Jo slyn drown | COtlEOAM 
Ashley Cooper, senior in agribusiness, finishes 
her barrel- racing event at the KSU Rodeo Club's 
annual alumni rodeo on Saturday. 



Today 



High 85 
Low 58 



Wednesday 







High 75 
Low 56 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Sebelius named Tops 

Gov Kathleen Se bell us was named 
one of the five best governors in the 
United States by Time magazine 
"Through spending tuts, fee increases 
and some borrowing, Sebelius was 
able to balance Kansas' budget in 
her first year In office without raising 
taxes or cutting funding for educa- 
tion.'' the magazine said Sunday. 



Manager killed 

Robin Belt 44, was found beaten to 
death at I id am. Saturday inside the 
Dollar General store in Bonner Springs. 
Kan., where she was manager, Sgt 
Mark 7 aretski said she suffered a 
severe head trauma Police are review 
ing a tape from a security camera at 
i nearby restaurant, but no suspects 
have been Idenl i fied 



Georgia-Pacific acquired 

Georgia Pacific Corp .is bskg 
acquired for more than $1) billion by 
Wichita based Koch Industries Inc. 
The deal was announced Sunday. It 
also includes the assumption of a $7 8 
billion in Georgia Pacific debt. Papei 
products from Georgia- Pacific include 
Brawny paper towels and Angel Soft 
tissue. 



DON'T FORGET 



Students with 10 or mere 
credit hours are eligible to 
enroll today 

The KSU Women's «« 

Club will meet at 7:30 
tonight in All Faiths Chapel 



The tntramurals swim 
meet will begin at 7:30 
tonight in the Natatortum 
For more Information about 
intramurals, visit www 
rmemm.ksu.edu/mtro- 
murah. 



R 



/ 



«a* 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 




1122 Laramie 



Bring tft/s ad in for a 
E sample 
VjjJ when tanning! 

539-3742 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Malt 
dnnk 

4 Tummy 
muscles, 
lui ,• 
7 Had on 
if* 
I ;ac- 
lion 

13 Bikini hall 

14 Fanzine 
subject 

15 SH 

thl p 

mapchoi 

16 Auto 

17 V* 

IB Hd tine ore 
20 > I 

22 An 

24 A DOM 

28 Su | 

32 1 

Beast's 
(uly 

33 Collateral 
mav 

34 ! ■» 
36 Si 

39 Decorate 
with gems 



41 [double- 
edged 
sword 

43 Chum 

44 Hand out 
hands 

46 Astronaut's 

i.nitt.t 
SO "Grapes 

ol Wralh" 

surname 
S3 Sheepish 

remarK 7 

55 Norway's 

>lal 

56 Satan's 
specially 

57 Hostel 
SB Simon or 

Diamond 

59 Un 

rjrmd 

60 flotation 

ilui ■ 

Sol 



DOWN 

1 Swiss 
range 

2 Weaving 
apparatus 

3 Relaxa- 
tion 

4 "Lost" 
network 

5 Heehaw 

6 rergte, 
more 
formally 

7 "On the 

Road 

Again" 

singer 
B Praise in 

veree 
9 Wade 

opponent 
to W.ip.n 
12 Longtime 

Smalra 

tollabora- 

tor 



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19 Greek 

cross 
21 Symbol 

ol 

mtngue 
23 

Galloway' 

25 Circulate 

26 Otherwise 

27 Angler's 

i!i;m 

28 Winglike 

29 Prima 
donna 

30 Military 
vehicle 

31 Gist 

35 Energy 

36 Links 

prop 

40 Binge 
42 Hydro- 
phobic 
45 Turner 
or 
Wood 

47 Second- 
hand 

48 Nastase 
of tennis 

49 Turnpike 
lee 

50 George 
W's 
brother 

51 Eggs 

52 Melody 
54 Whatever 

number 



WEEK IN REVIEW 

7 things you didn't know 7 days ago 



Avian flu found in Kuwait; officials say no threat to humans 



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i RYPTOQI II' 



The first known CSM ol the bird flu 
in the Arab world was reported Nov. 
1 1 after ■ dead flamingo was found 
on a Kuwaiti beach Mohammed aJ- 
Mili.nu of Kuwait's I'ublic Author 
ity for Agriculture. 1 and Fisheries said 
the BatmngO had the deadly H5N1 
flu strain Officials said there was no 
indication the disease would spread 
to humans and saw no cause for the 
slaughter of bird stocks. The bird flu 
has devastated poultry stocks and 
killed more than 60 people in Asia 

RADIO HOST ARRESTED 

James Keown, 51, a Jefferson City, 
Mo., radio talk show host was ar 
rested Nov 7 on murder charges 
Keown is impeded of allegedly 
poisoning his wife by spiking her 
Gatorade with a chemical found in 
antifreeze. lulie Keown, 31, began 
experiencing nausea, vomiting and 
dizziness and developed a rash on 
her leg in May 2004 On Aug. 20, 
2004, she was admitted to the hos- 
pital and testa ihowad tier kidneys 
were damaged and she was in need 
of a transplant. She was released but 
was brought back to the hospital 
on Sept 4 and slipped into a coma; 
she was pronounced dead four days 
Inter A preliminary autopsy showed 
Keown had ingested a lethal dose 
of ethylene glycol about eight to 
10 hours before she was admitted 
Middlesex District Attorney Martha 
■t-y said ihe motive may have 
been financial because of fulie Ke- 
own's $250,000 life insurance poli- 
cy, but her husband has never been 
able to collect because the death 
came under investigation 

POLICE ARREST SUSPECTS 

Australia police arrested 17 men 

on Nov a suspected of planning ■ 
major bomhing in Australia. Norm 
Hazzard, who heads the State's 




the company The Catholic League 
for Religious and Civil Rights called 
lor a boycott over Wal-Mart's ap 
piaacfl l" Christmas, which has 
ended because of an apology The 
customer service worker, identified 
only as Kirby, was responding to an 
i mail sent by a customer who was 
complaining about the replacement 
of "Merry Christmas" Wal-Mart 
spokesman Dan Foglcman said the 
e-mail had been taken out of con- 
ic M and said Wal-Mart apologizes 
to any person or organization who 
was offended by the e-mail 



Lento B*tefh|KUTEft 
Veterinarians prepare to take a blood sample from a chicken during an 
exercise to practice steps to be taken in case of a bird flu outbreak in 
Tetetlen, Hungary, Nov. 10, 



aniritcr-terrnrism police unit, told 
die Associated IVess that the sus- 
pects were followers of al-Qaeda 
leader Osama bin Laden Police said 
they expected more arrests in com 
ing days and wi 

"This has nothing to do with 
ethnic origin, cultural beliefs or re- 
ligious beliefs, this is about people 
p r e parin g to commit an act of ter 
rorism," New South Wales Police 
Commissioner Ken Moroney said in 
an interview with the AP. 

TEACHERS CONTINUE STRIKE 

Oregon Trail District teachers are in 
tlie third week of their strike over the 
No Child Left Behind Act leadtMl 
said they believed they will be re- 
placed, penalized or transferred ii 
their schools don't perform. Accord- 



ing to No Child Left Behind, schools 
must bring increasing percentages 
of children from all backgrounds 
on reading, math and wnhnu tests 
Schools thai repeatedly fail to mea- 
sure up will (ace unctions, which 
include school closure Union 
asking for the right to take pal In 
developing new required curricu* 
lums and wanl assurances that staff 
vcill not be replaced or transferred 

WAL-MART APOLOGIZES 

Wal-Mart S lores Inc. said on 
10 the employee who wrote an e- 
nuii to ■ shopper that Christmas 
is a mix of world religions, but the 
company still supports the generic 
-reeling "Happy Holidays" as be- 
ing more inclusive of celebrations 
by other faiths, no longer works for 



NEO-NAZIS TURN VIOLENT 

A group of neo-Nazi extremists 
clashed with police Nov, 12 outside 
the largest World War II cemetery in 
Halbe, Germany. About 2,000 neo 
Nazis hoped to stage a de m on stra- 
in in in honor of the Nazi soldiers. 
Counter- demonstrators blocked die 
entrance to the cemetery, and of- 
ficers were there to keep the peace 
between the two sides. The neo-Na- 
zis tried to rush the police and coun- 
ter-demonstrators, but were driven 
back Several officers were injured 

LEADERS WANT TROOPS OUT 
Sunni Arab leaders demanded that 
the United Stales and Iraq stop 
military operations in heavily Sunni 
areas The leaders are accusing the 
Shiite-led government of trying to 
divide the country because til 
month's legislative elections. Salih 
■I Mutlaq, a spokesman for the Ni 
tional Dialogue (ront, said military 
offensives are meant to stop Sunnis 
from voting in the Dec 15 election 
i mimanders said the oflcristvrs 
are to encourage Sunnis to vote by 
ing insurgents from tampering 
with theb 

Source: The Assorted Pt*m 



St VI K N H INI.S P H Q K 

MYF VI K S r M K ti R KF 



RIL R K P I 



\ k k 



PK G N N 



! I ' W 1 V T li R K M I KTI ' 
Wsierdai's < npmquip: II YOU HAPPENED TO 
HI Mil RE WHI N SOMEONE S Kl \l IA MAD. 
WOI I D YOU BE IN l"HH LINE OF IRE? 

Today's Cryploqui|) Clue; li equal* I-. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin 
board 

Campus Calendar Is the 

Collegian's (amput bulletin 
board iervlte Itr-rm in Ihe 
calendar can be published up 
to three times Items might 
not appear because of spate 
constraints but are guaran- 
teed to appear on the day of 
the activity To plate an item 
in the Campus Calendar, stop 
by Kediie 116 and fill out a 
form or e-mail the news edt 
tor at colkgionrnpublnuedti 



by 11 a.m two days before i! 
is to run. 

■ The Graduate School an- 
nounces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of 
Chad Godsey at 2 p.m. today in 
Throe kmorton 2002. 

■ The Women's Glee dub 
will perform at 7: JO tonight in 
All Faiths Chapel 

■ The KSU Theatre will pet 
form musical numbers from 
"PlppirfW noon today in the 
Union Courtyard 

■ Up til Dawn will have the 
make-up tetterwrttlng party 
from 6 to 9 tonight In the 
alumni center ballroom 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space If you see some 
thing that should be corrected, call news editor Kristen Roderick at 
S3245S6 oi e-mail collfqmmpubksu edu. 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police Department s 
dally logs The Collegian does not list wheel locks or minor traffic 
violations because of space constraints. 

At press time, the weekend's arrest report was unavail- 
able. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas Mate University, 
is published by Student Publications Int., Kediie 
103, Manhattan, KS66S06 the Collegian ts 
published weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer Periodical 
postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 POST 
MASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kediie 103, Manhat 
tan, KS 66506-7167. 
o Kansas State Collegian. 200 '> 



To advertise on 

kstatecoIlegian.com 



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Monday, Nov, 14, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



A day for remembrance 




Photo by Catrina Rawson | (OlltGWN 
Students from Chris Payne's second-grade class of Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School wave American 
flags during a Veteran's Day Parade on Poyntz Avenue Friday morning. The parade started at City Park and 
ended at the Manhattan Town Center Mall. 



By Logan C. Adams 
HAW ' GiAN 

Chaj ..Jt.'iuh -, d 

rom Wnodrow 

w il ion Elemental] I the 

northeast (.iinuT of [uliet and 

itz avenues before the start 

t Day Parade 

The student! played with 

:i American flags ihey were 

de and joked 

about noi ten touch the 

ground 

Ms mil touching, it's not 

i.mii'' Maddic layior, t, said 

wooden pole 

i hui kepi the flag 

[i the air 

. the south' 

Andrra Harm I, a 

teacher at Seven Dolors Child 

Center, kept watch over a 

ill wailing 

i Kxna candy. 

Col Patrick Johnson, 

assi" uf military su 

id I he parade with 

help from K Statu Army and Air 

Students, 

i re prom- 
walk and in 

The luded many 

-J soldiers 
etal area poli 
liuans and I' hoot* 

eing 
i i rans. 
Rosenberg, a chap- 
lain ntry Divi- 
ion Na- 
iithgrade 
dku taught by Angie Motley 
Mi.nula .Ann ild tiementary 

1 1 9 ■'■ ■ ■ foi Mildiers to be 



ROYAL 
>URPL 



we've gol i 



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Online 

For more Veteran's Day coverage, go to 
wwwMta\&.olki}mnxom. 

witli their families and honor the 
veterans that went before us," he 
said. 

The parade went down 
faynfcl Avenue and each entry 
paused at the grandstand in front 
of the Riley County Courthouse 
They were then announced by 
Col Richard Jepsen, a veteran of 
World War 1 1 who was stationed 
at Fort Riley in the 1960s while 
in the National Guard and spent 
several years working at K-State. 

The parade continued through 
an arch made by the upright lad 
ders of two firetrucks with an 
American flag hung by rope be- 
tween them 

Edward Field stood between 
the arch and the parade's end, 
who saluted with the passing of 
each of the several military col- 
or guards bearing the American 
Flag 

He said he served two tours in 
Iraq and was saluting in honor of 
the soldiers he had served with 

His family sat near his feet He 
saluted alone and didn't make 
anyone else salute with him 

Its a personal preference.' he 
said "I'm not going to tell people 
what to do, that wouldn't be what 
freedom is about" 

Dili Salazar, who said he 
served in the Army from 1961 to 
1981, stood with his 2 -year-old 
granddaughter, Keilec, to watch 
the parade 

"She loves it, she's having a 
ball," he said as Keilee tried to 
wave an American flag that was 
almost as big as her "This is her 



first parade" 

The flag proved too much 
for the girl, who lost her grip 
and dropped it. Her grandfather 
picked it up and waved it him- 
self and a soldier with the parade 
walked up and handed her one of 
the small American flags he was 
distributing to parade watchers 

Hie taft entry in the parade 
was Fort Riley's Commanding 
General's Color Guard, a unit of 
soldiers who march in uniforms 
made to match those wom by 
Union troops in the Civil War 
This was the last event for the 
color guard's leader, Capl. Cay la 
Slusher, who is being transferred 
to Fort Rucker in Alabama. 

"Between these guy* and these 
hnraes, it's been a dream job," she 
said. 

That afternoon, members of 
the Arnold Air Society, a part of 
the K-State Air Force ROTC and 
the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity 
sponsored a demonstration on 
prisoners of war in Bosco Stu- 
dent Plaza. 

Members of the two groups 
took turns sitting in a wooden 
cage to represent the confine- 
ment of thousands of American 
soldiers throughout history, and 
uniformed guards stood next 
to the cage holding mock rifles 
Each hour, a different POW from 
history was depicted 

At 4 p.m., the demonstration 
closed with a ceremony for all 
prisoners of war. 

"We give them their due grati- 
tude, appreciation and thanks," 
said Cadet Natasha DelRosario, 
junior in industrial engineering, 
who organized the demonstra- 
tion 



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1,400 Kansas athletes compete 
in Special Olympics Fall Classic 



ByTa*** F r»ndi 

Special Olympi cs Kansas 
was 'n town t* 1 * 5 Weekend and 
volunteers turned out m droves 
to run the toumarn cnl . 

More than 1.400 athletes 
from Kansas p ar, icipated m this 
year's Fall Classic, a two-day 
bowling and volleyball tourna- 
ment 

Susan Krumm, assistant vice- 
president of sports and compel i 
tion with the Spe c i a [ Ofympkl, 
said the athle'es Were bowled 
at three different locations > 
Zuckey Bowl tafc, the K-Statc 
Student Unio" arid CuS ,er Hill 
Bowling Center j n p or t KiU'v. 
Kan Vollcybal 1 matches took 
place at the P^ers Recreation 
Complex 

Krumm said athletes quali 
Red through area tournaments 
in order to participate in the Fall 
Classic, the state tournament, 

A Friday night dan« pro 
vided a break ' n compear 1 for 
the athletes. 

"We have a celebration dance, 
and the athletes J ove jt because 
they get to see their friends f TOm 
across the state," Krumm said. 

Krumm *&<* many of the 
athletes returned from previ- 
ous years, and that they a " have 
made friends during the tour 



"I like the d.iiiav athlete 
Mary Ann Tiiniimns said "Hut 
I don't dance with anybody I 
dame al home hjl nv 

The McPtwnon Bullpup^. 
coached by George and rut 
mona Eck, were une of ■., 
teams in competition 

"We have 56 athlci. 
team, and half oJ them .ire nvev 
playing volleyball" tald George 
Eck. who is also a I 
dinator for Special Olympics 
"Our team is doing very well." 

rge Eck said ever) I " > ( ' 
who participles In the I all 
Classic wins something M 
were awarded in the tup three 
finishers 

"Some teams gel ribbons, hut 
ours likes the medals better,' he 

said "NooMgOM home empty 

handed' 

George Kek said tn pas: 

there has ben i banquet for. the 
athletes before the dance Mi |s 
year, funding was nut sufficient 

"Special Olympics couldn't 
afford a banquet for all the ath 
letes this year," he said "But 
they hive the danee Ihey rktVC 
such a good time It's just one 
big party (or them 

Ramona Eck said the out ol 
town excursion is ,t big ileal for 
thcaihletesTheBulli 
and other expen 
by contributions 



iv penny goes to benefit 

the alhlt I Belt said 

The Bcks said when monej 
inirl, they do not hcsii.iti la 

purchase necesjuji tarns for 
EhtJf it tni In the past five years 
ihey h''ve volunteered to coach 
nil. thev usually end up do- 
nating quile a hit BfJCh \ear in 

support tin team, both n 
Krumm said many people 

donated then imu- n. 

including on campus < 

iinns and league bow 

lunia Kisit. Manhattan rest 

dent, assisted with hnwhtig 

■ rhh b ,i area u e tot 

ilu'in. and I do ii because I want 

to see them have s good time," 

■ who volunteered (or 

Wltlcli Michael Davis, nf the 
McPhetion Bullpupa, said ha 
likes the bowting toumamenl 

"I cti|i>v bowling ' lu- 
lls one ol mj lavorta spurts 
l \r played others but this h my 
tavoi I 
Bckah Bi 

tun- 
i u the toumamenl 
Ui ie volunteering t<>r l 
Him 
fur I .aid. 

much fun n 
hang out (vitl u uplift- 

ing to me l enjoj being around 



India Nite displays music, food, culture 



ByLolaShHmplln 

R*HS*SSWE( 0Utl) l*N 

The Indian students As- 
sociation celebrated U TSAV 
2005 The India Nite on Sat- 
urday with folk danei n S> songs 
and skits. 

UTSAV means festival, said 
Sham Kashyap, gra duate stu- 
dent in computer scie nCe 

The celebration's cultural 
program fe» tu fed rne mb efs of 
the Indian St Ud en ts Associa- 
tion Songs from rnt> vie s and 
plays, folk song s ari{ j devotion 
a! songs were at 80 performed 

A folk d» nc e was p er formed 
with music in three languages 

- Tamil, ^'egu an d Hindi 

- and a comi Ca j s kit about a 
committee meeting e ncour- 
aged audience participation, 

The cultural program ended 
with audience merrm"* going 
on stage *° do a f "* tiance 
with the performers 

After the p T0 gt»^ books, 
clothes, musical instruments 



and photographs of different 
types of Indian weddings were 
on display 

Weddings were (eatnn-J 
prominently, as they vary 
greatly h\ region m India, Su- 
jatha Prakash, seniur in pre 
professional elementary edu 
cation, said 

"Weddings are very differ 
em." she said "The dress. 
very different " 

Several silk objects were 
also on display, including one 
made of ahimsa silk 

Normal silk is i 
boilinf the cocoons and kill 
ing the ninth p ,d un- 

winding the silk Ahinv. 
is made hy allowing the pupae 
to develop into a moth, then 
gathering the silk The silk is 
a little rougher, Prakash said, 
but the prattle is mora hu- 
mane 

"It's the same prm 
of nonviolence that Ql 
preached,' Prakash said 

In end L [SAV 2005, there 




Phoio by Joilvn Brown 1 1 
Playing the tahalas, Ashwin 
Miitoy performed at a concert 
in All faiths Chapel. The concert 
was part ol the Indian Students 
Association celebration on Satur 
day from 1:30 to 10 p tn, 

hi Dur- 

'i in 
All l ipel 









^ Dale 

Brown 

Former Men's Basketball Coach 
Louisiana State University 

Friday/ November 18 

1:30 p.m. 

Forum Hall 

K-State Student Union 





Sponsored by Leadership Studies and Programs 

and the President's Office 






— „, 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 14,2005 



TO THE POINT 

School district, 
students must 
be accountable 

The poor performance of minority stu- 
dents in the Manhattan -Ogden USD 383 
school district presents a difficult dilemma 
for Uic parents and administrators of USD 
383. 

Certainly, there can 
not be an acceptance of 
these conditions. 

Instead, there must 
be acknowledgment of 
a difficult situation and 
a combined effort to 
overcome. 

Although race is 
not a popular or easy 
subject to discuss, it is 
necessary to determine 
what cultural and so- 
cietal factors have lead 
Manhattan minority 
students into an aca- 
demic gutter 

To accomplish this task we must exam- 
ine each child on an individual basis. 

Children do not like to be lumped into 
groups, the hallmark of standardized test- 
ing, and it is irresponsible to assume that 
what works for one child will be effective 
for all children. 

Empowering teachers and counselors 
to deal with each child on an individual 
basis is an important step to making chil- 
dren feel as if they are more than bubbles 
on an answer sheet. 

At the same time, students must be 
made accountable for their own progress, 
both good and bad. If poor grades bear no 
ill consequences and good grades garner 
no rewards then students won't be in- 
spired to achieve. 

The problems facing children today are 
not ones that can be put off, For they are, 
undoubtedly, tomorrow's catastrophes. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e-mail to lrtttnisnpub.lau.tdu, or in person to 
Ke&le 1 16. Please indude your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



To the point is an 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
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Matt Gorney 
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Curtis Johnson 
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Alex Peak 
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r 



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CONTACT US 

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Display ads 532-6560 Delivery problems 532-6555 



Time for change? 

Political parties too polarized; new party could help with compromise 

The art of compromise ~~ ~^^^^~ 1 is evenly divided between Encyclopedia. [nhn F Kennedy famously said, 



The art of compromise 
- like representative democ- 
racy - was an important part 
of the genius of America's gift 
to the world, The Republican 
and Democratic political par- 
lies today, however, seem to 
have lost sight of the lesson. 

Both parties have become 
so obsessed with a win-the- 
n ext - el ection -a t -any-cost 
strategy that attack politics 
are now considered normal 
and serious national problems are 
viewed as issues to be leveraged 
against the opponent rather than 
problems that need to be solved 

The political focus seems less 
upon whal Ihe average citizen wants, 
and more upon what the best-orga- 
nized activists claim to want in the 
name of the rest of the citizens of the 
United States 

Both parties must come to realize 
that the number of votes for each 




CHRISTINA 
FORSBERG 



is evenly divided between 
Republicans and Democrats 
It is close because an un- 
derlying majority of people, 
who do not trusl the extrem- 
ists on the left or the right, 
vote for candidates based on 
more than just political affili- 
ation. 

Unfortunately, both parties 
are so delusively polarized 
that voters find their choices 
increasingly limited. 
Over the past few decades, polari- 
ty between the parties has increased, 
and the fruit of that polarity is falling 
even farther from Ihe stable roots 
upon which our country grows. 
Today's parties are completely 
flipped from their original positions 
on the political spectrum 

The Whigs, ancestors of the mod- 
em day Republican Party, originally 
supported the use of government 
to "promote, regulate, correct and 



side is close not because the country reform" as stated in the Encarta 



Encyclopedia 

The current Democratic Party, 
however, once had the belief that 
government should act only when 
necessary, if at all This is quite 
the philosophical role reversal for 
today's parties 

The Whig Party was originally 
created solely to oppose the poli 
cies of President Andrew [ackson. 
Most political parties are formed and 
thrive based on a common unify 
ing set of beliefs in how the nation 
should be governed When opposi- 
tion for the sake of opposition takes 
priority over an evolving effort to im- 
prove governance, then such parties 
lose justification for their existence 

What happened? The focus has 
shifted from supporting a work- 
able approach to governance that 
recognizes our differences and the 
need for compromise, to striving for 
die most votes possible in an attempt 
to force the winner's will upon the 
losing side. 



|ohn t-' Kennedy famously said. 
"Ask not what your country can do 
for you ... ask what yt ru can do for 
your country." That includes the very 
leaders that the people of America 
elect to government offices. If nei- 
ther party can understand that they 
must meet the needs of all of the 
people in the best way possible, then 
both party's causes are also lost. 

If neither party can get beyond 
its obsession with the next election 
contest and begin focusing on solv 
ing voter concerns, then perhaps it is 
again time for a viable new political 
party. 

The last time that happened 
in American history, we elected a 
president named Abraham Lincoln 
Maybe we could use someone like 
that now 



Christina Fonbtrg it * tophomort in English 
and economics. Pleas* send your comments to 

opinion' „■< (pub. Jbu, tdu. 




'Red Green Show' bids farewell to faithful fans 



LUCAS 
MADDY 

"I'm a man 



^a||V For the last time, 

aj ^k 30 ice-fishers de 
J$ •*> ^1 part crude wooden 
' _ " benches, raise their 
right hands, and 
^■^ recite a prayer in 

'^^. ^^fw concert whose 
I insightful words 
| never escape the 
boundary of their 
secluded, semi 
secret meeting 
location. 

but 1 can change ... 
if I have to... 1 guess." 

For 15 years, the "Red Green 
Show" has commanded the rapt at- 
tention of tens, possibly hundreds, of 
faithful Public Broadcasting Service 
viewers whose antennas receive no 
other channels. Red is Ray Stevens 
without a song, fames Earl Jones 
without the voice and Possum Lodge 
1 3 leader without a choice. 

Red's can-do attitude and motto 
found their way into the hearts of 
outdoorsmen lacking in looks but 
hoping to be lucky in love 
"tf the women don't find you 



handsome, they should at least find 
you handy," he said 

Such depth of thought, camou- 
flaged in plaid flannel and simplic- 
ity. Last Saturday before a sold -out 
audience of flask packing, duct-tape 
wrapping, long winter diehards, after 
300 episodes of inventive 
antics, quick quips and 
punctual puns, the "Ked 
Green Show" finally 
played its last card 

Says the sign on the 
Possum Lodge door; 
Quando Omni Flunkus 
Moritati - When All 
Else Fails, Play Dead 

In truth, the only 
failure is Red's 
habitual tardi- 
ness in returning 
to satisfy wife 
Bemice's appar- 
ently insatiable 
hunger for hairy 
men in Christ- 
mas suspenders 
Creator and lead 
writer Steve Smith 




is the main man under the mis 
shapen hunting hat. His pragma in 
country approach to life's everyday 
social and backwoods challenges 
with nothing more than common 
sense and an ever present roll of 
silver miracle have earned him the 
Order of Canada 

The commendation is tin 
highest any Canadian civil- 
ian is eligible to receive 
Good to see Uncle Red 
is getting his due in the 
Northern regions, because 
Americans easily forget the 
man who brought them 
canoe jousting and creative 
uses for step ladders. If 
a recent poll is any 
indication, perhaps 
Red should be 
promoted as the 
savior of the Ca- 
nadian image 
The top 20 neigh- 
bors of Alaska 
included a number 
of lobe-assaulting 
musicians (Avril 



Lavigne, Sum 4 1 , Shania Twain, Neil 
Young, Alanis Morissette and Celine 
Dion) and shady thespians (Pamela 
Anderson, Peter North, Shannon 
Tweed) whose best efforts fall prov- 
inces short of Smith's wisdom and 
humor 

The backyard battles with physics 
and political correctness, gruff and 
insecure male bonding moments, 
utter disdain of technology: ] smile 
at the man who made a moped from 
a bicycle and a chainsaw It brings 
back memories of the childhood I 
barely survived 

This Christmas, give the gift that 
gives ideas that gives mothers heart 
attacks Order the Red Green DVD 
(Duct-Tape Virtuoso Deluxe), gift 
wrap it in a checkered wool shirt, 
and present to that special friend 
who longs for an excuse to eat 
chili and sip Hot Damn on a frigid 
winter's eve. 



Lucas Maddy h a senior in agriculture technology 
management. Pitas* s*nd your commend to 
opinhitiinputi.ktu.tdii. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fourum Is the Collegian's 
arwnyrnous call-in system. The Fourum Is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, ratist, obscene 

andllbelowtommeTitifheccmrtverYcsare 
not the opinion erf the Collegian mm art they 
endorsed by the editorial staff 

To thtt IrHMti dancing naked in my 

house, than* you. Vou made my week. 

It 4m pDM oflng Shane Sanders a 
nwybtv hfcartkV had nothing todo with 
K State or even colege sports. The gap 
between your mothers from teeth, though 



significant, is nothing compared to the logi- 
cal caps tn your argument Why dorft you go 
back to Lawrence, Jerkface? 

Than* poZadiaryldttfe tor writing the 
artrde about marijuana, I completely agree. 
See you in Denver. 

bitty OiUdrK) b the coolest thing Una? 

diced bread 

Wh«wauMwfatftj|umr>ropema!dv 
Voda or Rocky? 



To the giri who keeps leaving her dirty, 
white q-fjp in the shower on the fourth floor 
of Boyd, honestly, how nasty is that? Just 
thrown away. 

So Is Tiger Woods' cousin good it goJP 
Cause I need at new partner. Tiger Woods' 
cwjsin,ifyouarereadirv)thh,f1loayfotall 
our tee times If you just con* play wtm me 
Please. 

W«ihouMb*7-j, but yet another dose, 
hrMrthreaUngkru 



to Aw time, these close games will end in 
wrfavwandwewillber^agairi,bulto 
do this we must earn It 

Who woukf vt thought blocked point 
after attempts and a blocked field goal 
would have been the difference in the game' 
That hum 

Dm It «tf get any easier? Does the pain 
ever lessen? Or are we destined to follow 
i pattern of berating one another until 
trie death of every living creature is on our 
hards? 



I just found an expensive pair of sunglasses 
between AckmarrfThrcxkiTwrton. If 
the owner wants them back, e-mail 
ItrmfoundQgmailam with a description. 



i to the Kappa Sigma new 
initiates Sigma Kappa loves you. 

Oh my God, Butters the Squirrel has more 

facebook friends than I do. 



4: Kansas State University boy TaH, 
strong and handsome Must be reliable, 
Merely and fun. 



Do you ham a test tomorrow? Mope , OK 
lets go. 

ljusi found my comment on the Fourum 
and ran around my dorm floor. 



■ 



Why do banks get to be dosed on 
veteran's Day, but we stW have to come to 
dass?Thatisnofcool. 



i? fata 



for own* 



v - > - . , _■ •.- .. J 












• --. ■ 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



Wars 



Lucas' full 

saga now 

available 

on DVD 




CELEBRITY 
QUOTES 



By Mark Slbilla 
KANSAS STATt (Oil iOIAN 

Along time ago, in a gal- 
axy far. far away . . . 
"Star Wars" has hcen 
an integral part of the world's 
culture for nearly 30 years 
What began in 1977 as a little- 
film -that -could has turned into 
a multi-billion dollar industry 
that includes everything from 
action figures to video games, 
lunch boxes to clothing and 
costumes, it is also the leader 
of special effects and digital 
filming technology 

"Star Wars: Episode IV 
A New Hope" spawned two 
sequels, 1980's 'Star Wars: 
'i.le V The Empire Strikes 
Back" and 19H3's "Star Wars: 
Episode VI Return of the Jedi ." 

Through work with the spe- 
cial effects in the film, Lucas 
created his own visual effects 
studio, Industrial Light and 
Magic He then began work on 
his own protects and waited 
for the time when the techno! 
ogy was available to best trans- 
Lite the worlds and characters 
in his head onto the theater 
screen. 

Lucas began thinking about 



getting back in the director's 

chair when he saw ILM's ins! 
fully digital creations in the di 
nosaurs of "Jurassic Park." 

The Special Edition Tril 
ogy added new digital effects 
to the old films, this proved 
to be testing grounds for dig) 
tal eh producer Rick 

MeCallum said Work began 
Oil the prequel trilogy and was 
completed with ]Q-99's "Star 
Wars Episode I The Phantom 
Menace" The rest, as they say, 
is history. 

The saga is now complete. 
Not l, marked the day that 
fans of the saga were able to 
complete their "Star Wars' 
DVD collection witli tbe third, 
and final, movie of the prequel 
trilogy, "Star Wars: Episode HI 
Revenge of the Sith" 

The DVD, in addition to the 
feature film transferred directly 
from fa digitally Eilmed source. 
includes commentary from 
writer/director George Lucas, 
producer Rick MeCallum, ani 
mation director Rob Coleman, 
and ILM visual effects super- 
visors John Knoll and Roger 
Guyett 

The real treat of the DVD, 
however, is the included sec- 



ond disk that contains more 
thai) six hours of bonus i 
rial One of tin- most exciting 
features of the I iterials 

is the foil-length documentary, 
"Within a Mini 

The purpose of the d 
mentary is to show the amount 
of work and the number of 
individuals (conceptual art- 
ists, scene builders, sound 
engineers, prop- makers, musi- 
cians, etc.) that are required to 
make a scene in a movie that is 
literally less than a minute in 
length, MeCallum said 

"The main purpose of the 
('Within a Minute") docuim-n 
tary is to demystify the film 
business," he said "We want to 
show those who are interested 
in film just how many people 
,ire involved and how the pro 
cess (of creating a film] devel 
ops" 

MeCallum met George 
in England when he was 
working on the set of a film 
called "Dream Child," MeCal- 
lum said 

Lucas and MeCallum kept 
in touch until 1989, when 
MeCallum was recruited to 
produce the "Young Indiana 
Jones" TV series. MeCallum 



"Star Wars" DVD special 
features 

■ Six never-before-seen deified stews 

with commentary by George Lucas and Rick 
MeCallum 

■ Full-length documentary, "In a Minute, 
whkh gives an in-depth loud .»■ 
filmmaking process lot "Star Wan: Episode 
III Revenge of the Stth" 

■ "The Chosen ne ' fe.i i uses 

onAnakinSkywalkersn I 
DatthVader 

■ Behind -the scenes web documentary 
collection that gives a look into the making 
ot certain aspects ot the Mm 

■ Fheat ucal trailers and promot 
television and print campaign spots 

■ "A Hero falls" music video featuring 
John Williams and the London Syropli 
Orchestra 



en with I Unce 

and has been in charge of pro- 
duction for all of Lucas en 

de.ivors. 

MeCallum helmed produc- 
tion duties lor 'It 
Edition Trilogy" as well as all 
three prequel m<>\ 
Wars" has been an inl 



Photos courtesy Lucasfilm Inc. 



part ol Mil atlum'l career as 

•i pre* i lie said he is 

m thai it will end, 

arrow is also 

mixed with 1 1 -clings of being 

■• ol ' Sl.ir Wars ' It 

ike the fight time to end 

j, lie said 
as will not be making 

t S!;u Wars' films, 

is a 
-.lion TV series in tin' 
works I hat will 
tween "Episode Ml" and "Ep 
IV 1 1 will focus on the 
young life of Luke Skew alker 
■J he grows up on his aunt 
and uncle's mo 

oine I he release of "Star 
Wan" games and men 
•v ill continue, MeCallum 

Ml of the revenue ktm 
merchandising allows George 
I inn truly mde 

pendent and in-house," he 

,is is also working on 
ersnnal films One such 

I the Tuskegee Air 
an all -black company 

It in World War II 
I lot us on the re 
and tribulations faced by these 

i, MeCallum said 



Evolution of Darth Vader 



'Derailed' falls short as psychological thriller 




"Derailed" 

Movie review by Chrlttlnt Hi n ten 



"Derailed" is a dark action 
thriller that explores the danger 
of lies, and the lengths to which 
people will go to protect their 
most shameful secrets. 

"Clive Owen ("Closer" and 
"Sin City") plays mild-mannered 
Charles Schinc, a successful 
advertising executive and dedi- 
cated family man who seems to 
have it all. 

Hidden under Charles' pleas- 



ant facade, however, are the 
daily demands of a daughter's 
serious illness, and the toll they 
have taken on Charles' relation- 
ship with his wife. There are 
staggering bills to pay, and the 
burden has left him lonely and 
burnt out. 

Then one day Charles misses 
his usual train, and meets an al- 
luring fellow commuter, Lucinda 
Harris (Jennifer Aniston), who 
will change his life forever, 

The two hit it off, and im- 
mediately strike up a friendship 
But what starts as casual phone 
conversations and friendly lunch 
dates quickly evolves into dinner 



drinks, lies to their spouses, and 
nervously checking into a seedy 
motel to spend the night togeth 
er 

The couple is interrupted 
when a brutal attacker bursts 
through the door He beats 
Charles unconscious, rapes Lu- 
cinda, and leaves with their wal- 
lets and cell phones in hand 

Too ashamed to call the po- 
lice, the two part ways, hoping 
to forget the terrible night ever 
happened But their attacker, 
armed with their identities and 
dirty secret, refuses to fade 
away, 

Blackmail, threats and blood 



shed ensue as Charles and Lu- 
cinda try to escape the night- 
mare that their brief affair has 
become Charles creates lie after 
lie to cover his dishonesty, and 
struggles to turn the tables of 
mhood on his vicious at- 
tacker 

Director Mikael Hafslrom 
built "Derailed" into a dark, ac- 
tion thriller, where nothing is 
ever quite what it seems 

While loaded with tei 
and suspense, the film never 
quite lives up to its full potential 
at a psychological thriller A few 
too many gaps in logic, and an 
ending twist that has been ex- 



ecuted before in superior films, 
leave too many questions unan- 
swered. 

Owen and Aniston deliv- 
er riveting performances, but 
their characters are never fully 

mred Eor example, why 
Charles and Lucinda never break 
down and call the police seems 
unfathomable after watching an 
hour and a half of the film 

Ultimately. "Derailed" is a di- 
verting film that packs creative 
punch and plenty of surprises. 
I ewer gunshots and more char- 
acter development, however, 
may have pushed this film's cali- 
ber from simply good to great. 




(wrtei 



y nn 



') remember back when I was a kid 
there was a comic strip tailed Plastic 
Man His body was elastic and he could 
make his extremities as long as he 
wanted As a youngster I didn't fully 
appreciate it Bui I'm now thinking 
Ptastk Man was probably pretty popular 
with the ladies' 
Ben Affleck 

"To be in this business and have 
tremendous integrity and only make 
distinguished choices is very lough 
Den/el Washington's career is an 
enormous luxury Compare him to 
Wesley Snipes Do you think that they 
set out lot it to be that way' All actors 
set out for the same thing to make 
both entertaining films and important 
films 
Alec Baldwin 




Courtesy Art 



"I mean, I have a great job I get to 
dtess up and become somebody else, 
especially when iftsofflMM like 
legolas, who's this supw cool kind of 
otherwi" I lite Unlucky man, 

so why would i itettiatT 

Orlando Bloom 

"I don i is th* Hunk of the 

Pierce Brosnan 

"Classes weie always l bore to me I 
wanted vn. not 

by presentations I was i loudmouth 
and a down Itcameasasurpr 
me. later, that i could be serious and 
still g>? i 
N kolas Cage 

"Because of what I did when I was 10 
years old, I'm not livmq from paycheck 
to paycheck, and I can do thing] 
because I want to do them 
Mataulay Culkm 

"I'll never understand the animal, the 
machine of Hollywood business And 
I don't want to understand it It's like 
joining a club, a clique fust because 
everyone else is in it. Vou don i have 
any particular interest in it and it has 
nothing to do with who you are as a 
person You |oM join n beam it S the 
thing to do" 
Johnny Depp 

"Did you ever notice they never lake 
any fat hostages? Vou never see a guy 
coming out of Lebanon going I was 
held hostage for seven months and I 
lost 1 75 pounds, I feel good and I look 
good and I learned self- discipline. That's 
the imponant thing," 
Denis Leary 

"I just try to try to keep an attitude that 
I don't know what I'm doing Not to 
the point where I'm beating myself up, 
but I just go in think ing that l have a 
lot to leam And I hope I still have that 
attitude JO yeaR from now" 
Tobey Maguirt 




Courtesy Art 

"Now tomes the pan where I relieve 
you, the little people, ol the burden 
of your failed and useless lives But 
remember, as my plastk surgeon always 
said: if you gotta go, ao with a smile " 
lack Nicholson 

"I have to believe there's some other 
life force out there. I don't know In 
what form But we can't have all 
these galaxies and universes without 
something going on" 
John Travolta 



Source: Brainy Quote 






Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 



RODEO | Auction proceeds 
to fund team scholarships, expenses 



Continued from Page 1 

expenses are high to send the 
rodeo participants to compete 

"We're already out of money 
from SO A," Blasi said. 

I lie silent and live auction 
ut RC McGraw's featured priz- 
is from -in-.! iiuTch.ints, Blasi 
said 

"The community really does 
help us out a lot We wouldn't 
In able to do it without the 
community," she said 

The alumni rodeo and jack- 
pot roping events included 
hull rid inp. barrel racing, calf 
roping, breakaway roping, steer 
wrestling, goat tying and team 
mping. 

The jackpot rodeo included 
an open 30 barrel race, calf 
roping, breakaway roping, goat 
tying and team roping. 

The KSU Rodeo Club is 
gp >wing in size, and there is a lot 
mure involvement, Blasi said 

Musi of the participants are 
from the College of Agriculture 
hut that isn't necessary factor 
in ability to be part of the rodeo 
learn 

Lucas Holland, freshman 
pre-profesional construction 
science and management per 
formed well the calf roping 
event in the region, which is re- 
markable for a freshman, Blasi 
said. 

His brother, Rob Holland, 
sophomore in animal sciences 
and industry, won the team 
roping event in the region last 
year 

A graduate student who is 
considered a coach, but the 
team members are respon- 



Rodeo Results 

Caff Roping 

First place- Troy Kitchner 

Breakaway 

First place: Jaiek VanPetten 

Coat Tying 

First place: Jamie Dunn 

Barrels 

Firct place: Kandee Prieh 

Team Roping 

First place: Rob and Luke Holland 

Source: KSU Rod«e Club 

sible for all facets of running 
the club and setting up events, 
said Shelly Brenton, senior in 
animal sciences and industry 
said 

Dustin Wiley, senior in ani- 
mal science and industry, com- 
peted in the buUriding event, 
which featured a $1,000 prize 
and was open to all partici- 
pants. 

He said he has been buUrid- 
ing for five years, Wiley said 

"I just do it right now be- 
cause it's fun," Wiley said, add- 
ing that he didn't think about 
getting hurt much because 
that made it more likely to hap- 
pen 

"You just have a positive 
altitude and hit the ground 
running' Wiley said "It's still 
a sport and we're still athletes ■ 

The bulls used for rodeo arc 
mostly Plummer bred, due to 
their being smaller and more 
athletic, giving for a better 
ride. 

There are two judges who 




Joslyn Brown | COLI EbltN 
Roping a steer during team-roping, participants at the KSU Rodeo Club's annual alumni rodeo and auction competed in a variety of events, 
ranging from bull riding to goat tying. The rodeo was in Weber Arena on Saturday and Sunday. 



score on a scale of 50 points 
each, said Ashley Cooper, se- 
nior in agribusiness and girls 
club president 

The first part is a scale of 1- 
25 and is based on the bull and 
how it bucks 

The more athletic it is, and 
the better il bucks, the higher 
the score The second pa' 



on a scale of 1-25 and ranks 
the cowboy and how they 
ride. 

Wilber Kelley, professional 
bullfighter from Adrian, Mo. 
goes to 65-70 rodeos a year 

"Wherever the good Lord 
will let us go, we'll go," Kelley 
said. 

He has been fighting bulls 



for 14 years Kelley said, and he 
doesn't mind people confusing 
him with a rodeo clown. 

Rodeo clowns are there for 
entertainment, as a sort of half 
time show, while bullfighters 
protect the cowboy from the 
bull, Kelley said 

He said he had his head 
stepped on and spent more 



than two months in the hospi- 
tal recovering 

He said he still is trying to 
get back to his previous con- 
dition, and at first he was 
scared of going back out in 
the arena. 

"I'm just a little bitty squirrel 
trying to bust a nut in the big 
world of rodeo," Kelley said 



■ 



NAACP | Study shows discrepancy in students' scores 



Continued from Page 1 

recognizing: peer pressure. You 
have kids out there who will 
take those tests, and they're 
doing dot-to-dot," said Marvin 
Colbert, assistant principal of 
Manhattan High "That's what 
they're doing. Not because they 
don't have the skills, they just 
haven't bought into it ... It is for 
themselves, and it is for their 
peers, and it is for their com- 
munity." 

The academic curriculum 
was another topic discussed at 
the meeting. The district is ex- 



ploring possible ways to help 
those students at an academ j c 
disadvantage to catch up with 
their peers in terms of academ- 
ic performance 

"We're almost gelling to the 
point where we're talking about 
school year-round, because 
we know we have students 
with those needs," said Karen 
Roberts, executive director of 
teaching and learning for USD 
383 

The NAACP is an interna- 
tional organization established 
in 1909 The mission of the or 
ganization is to ensure the po- 



litical, educational, social and 
economic quality of rights of all 
persons and to eliminate racial 
hatred and racial discrimina- 
tion. 

Today the NAACP is divided 
into seven regional branches 
worldwide, with 19 divisions in 
Kansas alone. 

"Some of the solutions that 
USD 383 has put in place, now 
you know inure about them," 
Rep Sydney Carliu. D-Manhat 
tan sind at the meeting's con- 
clusion "The question is: is 
this a good forum'" and 1 think 
we should do il again." 



Students can get money by donating plasma 



By Lola Shnmptln 

KANSAS MMUOIUUAN 

Students who are strapped for 
cash can help others while cam 
ing money by donating plasma 

ZLB Plasma Services, 1130 
Gardenway, gives $25 for a first 
donation, and $40 for a second 
donation in seven days. 

Return donors receive from 
$15 to $20 for the first donation 
and $15 to $30 for the second 
donation. 

The amount received lor re- 
turn donors depends on factors 
such as the weight and amount 



of plasma taken, Chase Koester, 
junior in management, said 

"1 do it to make a little mon- 
ey, and it helps people," Koester 
said. 

He learned about ZLB 
through an ad in the Collegian 
and has been donating plasma 
for about one year, he said 

According to ZLB Plasma 
Services, the plasma is used fur 
treatment of various diseases 

It is also used for critical care 
cases such as shock and bum 
treatment, and is used during 
surgery and for fluid replace- 
ment 



Plasma is made of the liquid 
portion of blond and is us 
bleeding and infeclion control 

ZLB Plasma Services is open 
from 9 am. to 6 pin Monda> 
through Friday, and 9am In 2 
p.m. Saturdays. 

People who receive tattoos or 
body piercings must wait before 

donranj plasma, and /LB ad- 
heres to federal guideline 
Sonya Williams, senior managci 
of corporate communiuitn >n-. 

"Any donor who recti - 
tattoo or body piercing musi hr 
deferred for a 12 month period; 
Williams said 



L! 



Read the Gam^day edition 
Friday?* before ho nrsg fg«m «.■;>»■ 




Junior • Petite ^ 

Blue Jeans 

Lucky. Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, and morel 

*Z.50-*4.95 

Bring In Student ID for 25% 
off any one clothing item 

QUALITY NAME BRAND New & Gently Used 

CLOTHING AT 5096% OFF FJOAIL 

BUY &SELL 

The Apple's Heart 

Boutique Atmosp^et* Tnrlftstore Prices 
"Where Kansas Meets New York" 
1 1 3 S 5tfi • downtown poynrz * 31 7-547f J 



Manhattan Shoe Repair 




Double Bottom 
Fleece Slippers 

List Price $39.99 

Now $29.99 



Womens House Shoes 

Tan Suede/Pink Suede 

List Price $29 99 

Now $22.49 



216 S. 4th St. • VFW Plaza Plaza • 776-1193 



Album Release Party 

a©pc] 

S.O.S. Music 1214 C Moro 

.1)7 \UAom\&-A\\ Niglu-AtlAges 
m at Vim / ifiwrifr .\t,iiiomu! 

( OSmilti ( Hull U lun.i I'll 1/1. S' 



Snip N' Clip 

Hair cut stops 



Student cuts $7.95 



> 



HighJite Sl color 
service available 

T 1 



> 



3035 Anderson & 431 C Poyntz 

539-4043 776-6410 

M-F9aro-7pm 

anvSpm 



KSU Theatre & Dance and 

the Department of Music 

Present 



V> 



sis 



the musicol 



November 1 7-1 9 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



book by 
Roger 0. Hirson 

Student: $9.50 

Seniors: $11.50 
Public: $13.50 



music and lyrics by 
Stephen Schwartz 



McCain Box Office 
532-6428 weekdays 



www.ksu.edu/sctd 



yj r (_ r i m p e . r 3 

$65 Foil Hilite 
(add another color and haircut for $25) 

$30 Men's Hilite 
(add a haircut for $12) 

$27 Full Set of Nails 

$10 Lip/Brow Wax Combo 

$40 Massage or Spa Pedicure 

$47 Brazilian Wax 



"Best Deal in the Ville" 



717 N 11th St. • 539-7621 



November Specials 

5lnco 1975 




$60 Foil Hilite 
(add another color and cut for $20) 

$27 Full Set of Nails 

$15 Lip and Brow Combo 

$35 Men's Hilite and Cut 
(cut and brow wax) 

c r i m p e r s too 

K-State Student Union Lower Level 
Call for Appt. 532-5972 



Monday Might F##tball 





XALQOIT 



Chance to win a 

Budweiser tool 

box refrigerator 

and other prizes I 






i^Sf 



., 



f 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Monday, Nov. 14,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



l I I I 



ii II ii 



- 1 1 11 — 



■ i 1 1 •! 

■ I i ■ i ■ ■ 



LET'S RENT 



Roommate 

Wanted 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wauled Throe bod' 90/1*1 

apartment halt block (torn 
campus $250/ month plus 
one- thud utilities Call 
142-1554 



3 ' 



Sublease 

SUBLEASER WANTED 

founders Hill, Fou 

room $308 75 a mr 

bills Very Nice* Can 

(785>3I7-187S 

5145 



;lent- 
3pt, 

'irrvisried 

J3D COLORADO Base 
merit oflictency 420 square 
TfeSt Patio fenced yard, 
Jkjhtect parking Shared utOM 
-*M NO PETS. January 
riease $275. (785(776-8548. 

-A LARGE one-bedroom. 

labk] January I Close 

Jo, campus Washer/ dryer 

-t*Q4 Faifview. 1785)317- 

rrm. 

LIVE ONLV half block horn 

eampu* and walk to class 

is one-oedroom base- 

i apartment $400 plus 

eler : 

paidi AvaMabJf nnw with 
short term lease EmoraW 
Property M Iftagemeftl 

( /'85)556-68')9 

NKW TWOBEOROOM du- 
pie* De)M lo Ctimpi 
.nances furnished No 

1975, (785)3 1 3-f 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartment Ne»l ic cart 
,' nice Clean, quiet We 

rj H . , (785)537- 
rOM 



NEW TWOBEOROOM 

ground lloor apartment In 

dtt new appliances includ- 
ing dishwasher, very nice, 
515 Bluemont available 
January, ro pets, laundry in- 
cluded, $820 plus l 
(785)313-0487, leave m B s- 
■.«.■' 



ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT Close to campus 
Water and trash paid Avail- 
able October tst (785)539- 
1875 or (7851313.8296 

ONE BEDROOMS $370- 
three-bedroom* 
$700- $825 (785)537.7701 

STUDIO APARTMENT 7 
S260.' month All utJU 
cepl electric paid Lease 
and deposit required Avail 
December 1 

THREE BEDROOMS 

AVAILABLE I 

Central air, rain-operated 
(788)8 

TWO-BEDROOM DUPLEX 

Avaiiapia now to* short-term 
tease Small pets okay 
S550. Fmeraw I 
Managvirrnmt, (785)556- 



For Rent- 
Houses 



145 

Roommate 
Want) 



FEMALE ROOMMATE Nu 5UBLEASER(SI NEEDED 
smoking Two-bedroom One block Irom - 



apartment Close lo cam- 
pus Off-afreet parking 
Washf i itXe im- 

mediately (620)481-9837 



EVERYTHING NEW Three, 
bedroom, two tiaih house 
with garage West ot cam- 
pus Available soon Emer- 
Management. 
(T805S8-88H 



FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath, two biocka from cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer hook- 
ups Deck with grill Ouiel 
yard. 
i 1 400 month 
' rrwdiiiity Call 
! or rnaloner- 
ental ffly ahoo com 

HAVE VOUR own bath- 
teoffl Four bedroom tour 
bath Waik-m closets 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
Clow tp Agoieville and cam 
pur. Available nw Emerald 
Property Management, 

(785)558-8889. 

THREE-BEDROOM 

THREE btOGM 

gievilie Spacious, washer' 

central an $675. (785)537 
9425 or (785)532-4424. 



MALE ROOMMATE needed FEMALE ROOMMATE 



tor three -bedroom house 



three -bedroom house tor 



$200' month. n*ll to cam- SDrir 9 *»mester Rent $320 
BM washes dryer Availa- P lu8 u " lmM Vefv ™" 



b)e now (9131579-2209 

Roommates needed tor 
lour -bed room next to cam- 
pus. Twn nam washer/ dry- 
er dishwasher No pets 
(785)537-7050. 



Sublease 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Rant negotiable 
Please coniacl (785)556- 
0169 

ROOMMATES MALE or 

tern n la r>ts okay Rani he 
dryer, 

large yw utilrlies 

■ 



house (316)990-2048 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed Fun, oul-going, no 
pets Twu tmdrijoms availa- 
ble. $300/ each (913)488- 
2745 

NICE BRICK home Wash- 
en dryer, walk to 

-'or ape, three female 
roommates $275 tent, no 
bills Available January 
1 785 144 3- 2229 

ROOMMATE WANTED. 

baa Scott 

(765)341-51 53 

SUBLEASER FOR one of 
tour-tiedronms. University 
Crossing Begins J 
$275 monlhly Cable I rash 
washer/ dryer lurnlshed 
(3161850-6563 

WALK to class No smoking, 
no drinking, no pets 



'■ash paid Washer' 
dryer included W,<- 
second semester Call 
(3161288-9629 

SUBLEASING A two ben 
room close to campus For 
more information call 
(6201276-4940 

tWO BEDROOM A PAP I 
ME NT $400/ month at 1026 
Bertram! upper apartment 

II interested. Call (620)719 

TWO-BEDROOM SPA~ 
ClOUS apartment sublease 
Jam m ry 1- May 31 $285' 
person OisTiwaaher. central 
heat' air Five mmulc walk 
to union (785)537-6880 



5PRIN< rER sub 

least- 

■ 

Discounted rant' $225, 
month 

Available December 



Office Space 

AGGIEVILLE RETA- 
space tor tease Hafli 
ner Shopping Center Off 
Sheet parking 1785)539 
0350. (785)31 3 





032 



Shout 
Guts 

.'NG (it hoes 

CHUCK NORPIS ■> my hu 
Dy s lather 

M15S ALPHA C : 1 1 . Omega in 

.need on 
i >n the sclwy 



i St Buffaloes stop 

■ ' 
you re in college now, invesl 
In some new gear 

GOOD ' 

■ 

■ 
■ 

HAPPV fjiKTHOAv MMl 



white Just i lip someone 
-in your hat if you 
stop sharing women 

I HECENTLV found myselt 
daydreaming about my 75 
year okl psehology 

/our baseball hos- 
■ m fluess -,-,- 
have to 

K LOPINA is tho coolflsf kid 

and wears jean 



how l like my loe cream and 

COLD' 

OLATHE EAST Hswks. 

humrnm bud "otoj what 

SO I mo- 
Hale, we are meet- 

THE VETERAN'S Day pa- 

' you were 
there 







■ , has five air- 

1744 

wwwksueiii 



ami check 

OUT Manhattans favorite 

rosuu/ani and bar websitu 

a.ois oi specials, entenam- 

irient t-shlrts and gift certltt- 



02Q I 



Loei and Found 



Lost and found eda can be 
placed tree tor three days. 



Poet a Note 



We require s form ot pic- 
ture ID (KSU, driver's II- 
oenee or other) when plac- 
ing a post a note. 



For Rent- 
Apts, Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assure* every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without dlstlnc 
Hon on account ot race. 
sad familial status, milita- 
ry tlatua. disability, reli- 
gion, age. color, national 
origin or sneeatry Viola 
tions should be reported 
to the Director ot Human 
Resources at City Hall, 
1785)587 2440. 

For Rent- 

Apt 

Unfurnished 

AVAILABLE 

n #2 Three- bed- 

ly room 
Screened hack porch Kitch- 
en appliances $695 Close 
to downtown City Park and 

2462 

NEWLY REMODELED twi> 
bedroom .« pin-Inn-.-. 
paid* Aval. 
December and January ot 
faring semester leiir. 
MDIat(7B5l77B-3804 



NOW LEASING 



Com bridge Squa • 



537-9064 



■■ 
i ■ ki iii H 



■J i .ii. 1 



For Rent- 
Houses 



ONF -BEDROOM v 
t . smoking | 

'851539- 

tJEDROOM ONE 
bath, house 



■Ii KSU 
85)532- 
7569 ur (785)532-754). 



DROOM 

into now and 

'. ' li .j- mi , il ML' I i)i 



lOOVoom 
dupieies Walk to ciaaa No 
King, no 
pels (786>S38 

rwo on 8hm 5 ed ro« j w i 

close lo campus Spacious 
cenlral air, dishwasher 
laundry facility Wa > 
traahpaid (785)53? 



lent' 

Houses 

AVAILABLE NOW three- 
bedroom 908 Vattlef, $750 



For Sale- 
Houses 



LAKE i slones, 

l| ■■' i /rrge 
deck and screened porch, 
sand beach boat ramp 
great view 1 $139,500 
(785)468-3531 



136 1 

For Sale- 
Mobfli Homee 






4x52 with 
c or best 
173 in Sall- 



MONTH MONTH Leases 

Two-bedroom, $520 Three- Oft-atreet parking [70m 13 

bedroom $620 1510 Col- 3579 

legs Ave (785)537-2098 



www 






Meet 



Match 






You sit two rows behind him during your 
cla&9 in that big lecture hall, 

YouVe bt5cn admiring htm from afar since 
the flret day of class. 

You're too shy to qo up and talk to him, 
Let us help you. 

Advertise in the Collegian personals, 
and pretty soon. ..you'll get to sit right 

next to him. 

Kane's State Collegian 

1(13 Kedzie 532-6656 



2000 SCHULT 16«80 
Three -bedroom . two bath. 
■ k fenced lot, #257 
Rive', nase Reduced to 
taM CHI (7851564 0904 or 
(785)565-8292 



Sublease 

$385' MONTH, university 
Crossing Cable washer/ 
dryer, fur rushed One bed- 
room open 10 two-bedroom 
apartment Plear- 
1913)909-5448 

AGGIEVILLE LOFT Lease 
Irom January August 2006 
Four bedroom Ma balh- 
room, new carpet $350' 
month Moore i- 1 ' 
Management 1 785)537- 
0205 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted tor spring semester 
One-halt block from cam. 
pus $275 All utilities paid 
Call Ashloy ai (31 
7768 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted. Great apai' 

Wildcat Village 

a ullag e- 
iiSQf month 
1 electnc and 
',..•■ .'..I • . rjryai in unt, 
basic cable tndudai 
1386 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Three block', from 

Irom Aggie- 

*'tile Washer' dryer $275 

Call (785 1282- 5364 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Waling distance lo 
campus Large room $300 
plus one- third utilities. Avail- 
able January 1 Please call 
(785)640-3288 

MALE SUBLEASE warned 
One-bedroom out of three- 
bedroom house Rent $3007 
month plus utilities Avai'a- 
bie second sr- 
(913)636-6886 

NEED MALE 01 Ian lie -..it 
leaser December $275' 

month plus ulililtes Close Id 
campus (316)644 21(8 

ONE BED ONE hath $38?- 
cable included Pay lor gas 

7768 

ONE BEDROOM CHASE 
Manhattan Ap.i I 

Call 
(785)538-8366. Waler' (rash 
paid Pets allowed 

ONE BEDROOM $395, ca- 
ble/ water paid Laundry/ 
■1 site Small 
pets Outet Available now 



SUBLEASER NEEDED lor 
January t Spacious one 
bedroom, close to campus/ 
Aggteville (785)564 7134 

SUBLEASER NEEDED tor 
spring semester One-bed- 
room, one bathroom apart- 
menl, near campus $45C 
month plus electric Call 
Caroline (785)564-1284 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Spring semester Four bed 
room aparlinenl. two blocks 
Irom campus $2S0i month 
plus utilities Contact Kelly 
19521200-6842 



Weight Loss & / 
Nutrition 

I LOST 55 pounds 
weeks 1 See pictures and 
read my story online 
www lOEeweia h! Iriflftl WIT 




310 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty the financial potential ot 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Car ear classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach soy 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson. 
Topoka KS 66607-1190 
(785)232-0454. 



Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field ot 
work or Inbor for which 
he/ she Is properly queli- 
fied regardless ol race, 
sen. military status, disu 
billty, religion, age. color, 
national origin or ances- 
try. Viol at 1 on a should be 
reported to the Director ot 
Human Resources al City 
Hall, (785)587-2441 

(BARTENDING 1 $300 .1 day 

necessary Tra 
od Call 1-S00.965.ti 

UJ 

CHRISTMAS BREAK spe- 
ctal Not going honw 
holidays' Earn soon 
& have fun from mi 
camber to Jan 3rd at the C 
Lazy U Guest Ranch in the 
R:n>i*s When atom ■ 'k- 
1 shed spend a week with 
Iree room and board to pur 
sue your favor He winter acti 

uHaa in Brand County Colo 

-jntact Phil Dwyer at 
(970) 887-3344 or Email 

tsktuUtstuxHiSaiD 

LUNCHROOM.' PLAY 

GROUND Supervisors- 
Hall Monitor* needed (or 
the 2005- 2006 school year 
$6 SO pit l*Q« one and 
one-halt- two hours per day 
1 1:00 a m - 1 00 p m Apply 
lo USD 383 2031 Prjynt? 
Ave . Manhattan. KS 86502 
(785)5872000 Equal Op 
portunity Employer 



Help Wanted 

'MIC Ofc ■ 
MENT Coordinalo 
lime position available in 
Wabaunsee Count) 
baaed upon enpenence For 
complete position doscip 
tlon please contact WCED 
al (7Bfi|76 r i 4bSfi- 

WCED PO Bo» 5 Atma, KS 
66401 or email to 

wcodc iy ■ kansai nel 

GET PAID lo drive a brand 

new car 1 h|i 

ers $800- $3200 a month 

PWl up vouT tree car key to- 
day 

www .tteeca/key . com 

OUTBOUND SALES uv 
icPtu* is the nation 5 leader 
in producm | 
signed local go vein men I 
Websites Currently we are 
hiring part-time and hni ttna 
1 ■ 

■ 

I mea ner aMHi 
Basa wage plus bonuses 

iQout $18/ hour or 

II resume to 
JOfisfictn cuius. sutP m Mi 

Equal Oppohunity Employ ■ 
er 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC 
PLUS is the nations leading 
u'omder oi BUetOffl designed 

■ 

perience required $14 50 
hour Email resume in Mi 
oroaofl Wo d 1 1 •■ ■■•■ rottnat 

to )Qe^6 yclv ic plus co rn 
RETAIL SALES Clerk po*i- 

LlQUOr Apply in o> 

930 Ha. 

■ 
nmiT. Hid .v >.->■>. 'o, I: 

ROYAL PURPLE YEAH 

BOOK 

marketing assistant to help 

1 'omotionai - 

/. ilh yearbook sales 
and particLpate at tMrfiaHng 
activities Work on salary to 
help promote K- Stales 
award-winning yearbook 

uny week Si 
mediately. Call Lindsay Por- 
(785)532-6557 tor 
more information 

3TUOEN1 NEEDING ode 
home occasionally lo Par 
ion KS on weekf?' 
share expenses (620)42 1- 



STUOENT PUBLICATIONS 

sitv is accepting applications 
■art time position lor 

1 105 be 

1 the tirsi weak ot 

team malnlalns 
■ 
stations ;woviding 
Support as well as : 
mg general hardware main- 

wth Mac 
OSX 

any or 
1 a plus 
■ 

natal troubleshooting 
wledge 
ot MyBC 

.■ 

LlTily slti 

ra at Kansas 

1 

1 6 Ked 

u 

. 




Earn class credit working with the ad design/production naff on 
the Kansas Stafe Collegian during spring semester 2006. Limited 
enrollment. The instructor's permission is required. No prerequisites 
are necessary. Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a.m -3 p.m. for an 
application Application deadline Is Friday, Nov. 18. 




Advertising Design 



Kansas State Collegian 



<p If you are a graphic design major and would like an 
on-campus spring 2006 internship for credit, stop by tor 
an application. Your art department adviser's permission 
is required Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 18. 



Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. 
for more information. 



S80I 

Business 
Opportunities 

The Collegia" cannot veri 
fy Iho financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em 
ploy men I/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business Opportuni- 
ty with reasonable ceu 
lion The Collegian urges 
our readers to coniacl the 
Better Business Bureau. 
501 SE Jefferson. Topeka. 
KS 66607-1190. (785)232 
0454. 




410 



Items for Sale 



sprayers on sale h.' 

Call (785)34 1 5294 of email 

dacrrwi 

f>ffl 

| trajutwrtttion 



Automobiles 

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Page 8 J 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



K Stale senior Joe 

Moore competes 

Sept. 9 In the 

K-State'KU Dual 

in Manhattan. The 

Wildcats ended 

their season 

Saturday with a 

1 4th place finish by 

the men's team at 

the NCAA Midwest 

regional*. 

Catrlna Hawson 

(OUt til AN 




K-State finishes 14th at regionals 



By Chris Patch 
KANSASSTATE COLlfGIAN 

The K-State cross country 
teUOt) ended wilh a 14th place 
finish by the men's team at the 
NCAA Midwest regit inals Satur- 
day in I own City. Iowa 

Senior [oseph Moore led the 
iraj for the Wildcats, finishing 
51ft witli a time of 32 mini 

1 nconds, narrowly missing the 

top 25 cut-off that qualifies run- 
ners for nationals 

The women's team, which 
struggled with injuries through- 
out the year did nol run Lill 
Mendel Uld lana Gwinn were 
the only two female runners. 
Mendez finished 50th with a 
time of 22:44 

Gwinn placed 136th with a 
lime of 24:55 

h Michael Smith said he 



was somewhat pleased with the 
sqaud's effort 

"I think we finished where 
we could, we didn't do anything 
special," Smith said. "We ran an 
average race. (Joseph) Moore 
ran what he could run We 
though) five teams from four re- 
gionals could make 
so it was a lough meet ." 

Throughout the season the 
men's learn struggled to crack 
IntO l Ik- top hall of raCM, while 
the injury -plagued women's 
team found themselves routinely 
in the back of the pack The re- 
spective eighth and 10th place 
Hig 12 finishes were typical ol 
the season 

Smith said the men did an 
adequate job meeting expecta- 
tions 

I think the men did what 
they could do," he said "Some 



guys ran better than expected, 
some guys met expectations. We 
were better than we thought we 
could be at the beginning of the 
year Is that where we want to 
lv ' No. Is that successful ? No. 
But it's realistic. 

"With the women it's not 
what we want, we can be bet- 
ter but that's going to take time 
CrOM country is lumped with 
track (at K-State), so we're com 
pt'ting with schools that maybe 
put all of their emphasis in that 
an a and neglecl track We don't 
da that, for us to compete it 
lakes time You can't do it all at 

once." 

With no representatives at 

nationals, the Wildcats will be- 
gin to prepare for track season, 
which starts Dec. 9 with the 
Carol Robinson Winter Penla- 
thalnn 



VOLLEYBALL 

Road 

winning 

streak ends 

in Texas 



By Angie Hanson 

KANSAS 5TM1C0I I K.IAN 

The Wildcats had become 

quite the mad mutihis having 
won three straight matches on 
the re 

That winning streak ended 

mi Saturday afternoon tn Col" 
lege Station, Texas, when Tex- 
as A&M dropped K-State 3-2 
(28-30, 30-23, 18-30, 30-20, 
25-13) 

For tin second time this 
week, coach Su?ie Fritz was 
ipeechleaa when asked what 
went wrong 

"You know, I'm just not 
sure," Fritz said of the Cats' 
mosi recent I * 

It seemed that inconaiaten- 
cy, once again, reared its ugly 
head 

In game urn- K-State was 
down most of the game - at 
one point by nine - but man 
aged to tie ii at 23 oil a kilt by 
sophomore setter Stacey Spie- 
gel berg. 

From there, senior out- 
side hitter Agala Retcnde and 
sophomore outside hitter Rita 
Litliom took charge, tallying 
two kills each to lake the first 
jMine. 30-28 

"We had a tremendous 
Comeback," Fritz said of game 
one. 

In game two, K-State took 
a quick 1-0 lead and stayed 
within reach throughout, until 
the Aggies began palling away 
at 20-15 

After that, the Cats never 
got closer than five points 

Game three was a flip flop 
and proved to be in K-State's 
hands from the start. 

Texas A&M never led, and 
the Wildcats started the frame 
with a 12-3 lead with the help 
Of junior [anile Perkins' three 
quick kills. 

The ( n increased the 

lead to 219, staying in an of- 
fensive rhythm to grab the 
tory. 

"Wc played really well in 
game three," Fritz said, "and 
then just broke duwn in game 
four wilh service errors and 
net fouls - we're still fighting 
those" 

Indeed, K- St ate was its own 
worst enemy, combining for 1 1 
service errors. 

Game five was no bet- 
ter, as the Wildcats couldn't 
combat the offensive force of 
Laura {ones, an Aggie outside 
hitter who had eight kills in 
the last frame and 35 on the 
game, which tied a school 
record 

"Laura Jones was an a mis- 
sion today." Fritz said. "She 
was getting 70 percent of their 
sets, and we were having a dif- 
ficult time stopping her" 

Rezcnde paced K-State 
with 18 kills and UUIon . 
ed her in double digits 
with 10 kills. Perkins and 
redshirt-freshman Megan 
Kroeker were right behind wilh 
nine each 

Spiegelberg had 51 set as 
sists. 

Still, sporadic moments of 
offense aren't going to win 
games, Fritz said 

"There arc no excuses We 
didn't play well down the 
stretch," she said 




Cntrina Rawton | (OMKIAN 

Victor Mann picks up a dropped pass from Allan Evridge Saturday afternoon in Lincoln, Neb. The Wildcats were attempting a 2-point conver- 
sion after scoring a touchdown during the second half of the Wildcats less to Nebraska. 

Miscues plague Wildcats in loss 



By Matthew Girard 

KANSAS STAIKOl I EGIAN 

LINCOLN, Neb . - The Ne- 
braska Cornhuskers handed 
ite a will Saturday, and 
ii.-. Wildiats prompt!) handed 
it right hack 

With A 18 left in the fourth 
quarter, tophomoro kicker 

Tim Schwerdt sent a high, 
arching kick through tl< 
rights to give K Stale a 
lead 

The outcome then rested 
with the Wildcat defense 

On Nebraska's ensuing 
drive, freshman quarterback 
Harrison Beck completed a 
21 -yard pass to redshirt-fresh- 
man Nate Swift to the K-State 
46 yard-line 

After the throw senior de- 
fensive end Tearrius George 
hit Beck, drawing a rough- 
ing the passer pei ilty which 
tacked on an extra 1 5 -yards 
to the completion 

The penalty set up Nebras- 
ka kicker Jordan Congdon's 
eventual 40 yard game-win- 
ning field. 

"We did good things in all 
phases of the game and we 
did some things that were 
very costly in all phases of the 
game," coach Bill Snyder laid 
after the Nebraska loss 



For the Wildcats who will 
finish with thctr second con- 
secutive losing season for the 
first lime since the 1989-90 
seasons and will nut p] 
a bowl game Tor the second 
year in a row, miscues such 
urge's have haunted the 
team all 

Against Oklahoma, punter 
Tim Reyer was absent from 
the punt loi matioii. which re 
suited in a safety 

A blocked punt was called 
hack due In a holding penal I v, 
swinging the momentum in 
[ech'l lavor and return- 
er lermaine Moreira's muffed 
pun I set up the win for Colo- 
rado. 

Along with George's pen- 

alt) against the Cornhuskers, 

kicker Jeff Snodgrass had an 
cxlra point and a field goal 
blocked, while sophomore 

Marcus Walts miss handled 
an extra point snap and the 
Wildcat offense was unable to 
capitalize on two ItfctlM In 
the defense. 

"We had every chance to 
win the game." Watts said. 
"We just didn't execute when 
we needed to" 

Defensive tackle Derek 
Marso said the blame Em the 
hiss and the season falls on 
the whole team's shoulders 




C*lrln» R*wion | ' ill 1 l&IAN 
Coach Bill Snyder argues with a referee during the fourth quarter of 
the Wildcats' loss to Nebraska Saturday afternoon. 



"The defense gave the offense 
some great Bead position, and 
we didn't gel the points that 
we needed, bul then again the 
defense had the game in our 
hands and we couldn't stop 
them," Marso said "It's just 
something that has plagued us 
all year 

Against Nebraska, the 
Wildcats were flagged 14 
times for 108 yards, bringing 
their season I olid in ^0 penal- 
li'.s for 774 yards 

K-Stale also added thr. a 
fumbles to its Big 12 Confer- 



ence lead 

Despite the loss putting 
K-State out of contention fur ■ 
bowl game, Watts said there is 
still plenty to play for against 
the Missouri Tigers Saturday 

"We'll be motivated," 
Watts said "It's the seniors 
last game and we want them 
to go out on top with a win 
Wi re not going to quit foil 
guys (the media) can say wc 
are like the 04 team, but we 
know we are not like the '04 
team and if you guys want to 
say it, that's fine with us" 



FOOTBALL | Late penalty sets up game-winning field goal for Huskers 



Continued from Page 1 

Beck's pass and returned it lo 
the Nebraska nine-yard line. 
That set up Tim Schwerdt s 
26-yard field goal, in place of 
Jeff Snodgrass who had a held 
goal and point-after attempt 
blocked, to give K-State a one- 
point lead with four minutes to 
play 

It was sophomore Schw- 
erdt 's first field goal of his 
collegiate career, and (he first 
time the Wildcats had the lead 
in the fourth quarter in confer 
ence play since they beat Kan 
sas. 

On their next possession, 
the Cornhuskers offense - that 



been kepi in check after then 
first possession of the second 
half when they scored on a 34- 
yard touchdown pass - con- 
nected on a big pass play and 
got the break they needed to 
move into scoring position 

In for an injured Zac Tay- 
lor, Beck, who had not taken 
a snap all season, connected 
with Swift i m 2 1 -yard pass play 
that put the hall al the K- Stale 
46-yard line. 

Another 15 yards were add- 
ed on from the spot of the ball 
00 Tearrius George's second 
personal foul of the game, put- 
ting the Cornhuskers in field 
god range. 

Nebraska tacked on seven 



more yards on the possession 
to set up Jordan Congdon's 40- 
yard game winning field goal 
that made Nebraska bowl-eli- 
gible after missing the post sea- 
son last year for the first lime 
35 years 

it was reminiscent of the 
Colorado drive last season, 
Wc had a big penalty that re- 
ally, really hurts us, but wc just 
didn't execute at the end of the 
game," Marcus Watts said. 

"We felt coming into the 
season we had a good oppor- 
tunity to make it to a bowl this 
year, we felt like we had a good 
team and we still do have a the 
ball just didn't go our way this 
year, jusl like last years team 



It's tough, but we never have 
given up and that's the key 
thing" 

K- Stale still had a chance to 
win the game with less than a 
minute to play and no timeouts 
remaining. 

The drive faltered on fourth 
down and 15 as quarterback 
Allan Evridge was flushed 
from the pocket, and his pass 
to Davin Dennis was broken 
up, officially ending the Wild 
cats attempt to become bowl 
eligible. 

"People are down, people 
are frustrated, senior Jemim y 
Clary said. "We now know 
lhat we are nol going lo a howl 
game." 



Monday, Nov. 14,2005 

SPORTS 
ONLINE 



The towing team defeated 
Kama; in the ninth annual Sunflower 
Showdown on Saturday To read on, go 
to wwwhtoltiolkgtan.com. 



NFL Scores 




Arizona 
Detroit 


21 
29 


Houston 
Indianapolis 


17 
11 


Kansas City 
Buffalo 


i 
14 


Minnesota 
MY Giants 


24 
21 


New England 

Miami 


M 


Denver 
Oakland 


11 

17 


Baltimore 
Jacksonville 


i 

10 


Grtcn Bay 

Atlanta 


11 

25 


NY lets 
Carolina 


J0 


San F rant wo 
Chicago 


9 
17 


'it lOUB 

Seattle 


It) 

31 


Washington 
Tampa Bay 


15 
16 


drakes' 

Pittsburgh 


21 
14 








Newman 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

CFB| 3 Wildcats named 

to Big 12 Anniversary Team 

Three K-State Wildcats were 
named to the Big 1 2 Conference's 
10th Anniversary 
Football Team, 
league officials 
announced Nov 
10. 

The list of 
K-Slaters on the 
26 -man team 
includes defensive 
back lereme 
Newman, 
return specialist 
David Allen and place -kicker Martin 
Gramatica 

The team was selected by a 
combination of media and online votes 
(torn Big 12 fans. More than 2.300 tan 1 , 
participated in online voting through 
the league's Web site 

In order to be eligible for con yd 
eration, candidates must have been an 
All fjig 12 hist Team selection at least 
once m their careers 



CSC I Manhattan Christian 
College soccer wins title 

The Manhattan Christian College 
men's soccer team won the NCCAA 
National Championship on Nov. S in 
Kissimmee, Ha The Crusaders defeated 
Cincinnati Christian University 2 to 
secure the title 

Not only were the Crusaders 

national champions, but they also won 

the Central Region Conference, marking 

then eighth straight regional champi 

onship — the longest current streak in 

NCCAA soccer 



The Associated Press 

CAR | Bosch wins race after 
brother's suspension 

AVONDAU, Anz Us a family 
thing. 

Even as Kyle Bosch celebrated 
victory at Phoenix on Sunday, he Mood 



up for older 
broihet Kurt, who 
was suspended by 
his team eatliei 
in the day lot a 
Friday night run- 
in with police 

Kutl Busch, 
the icigning Cup 
champion, was 
set down by 



m 

Li 



Busch 



Roush Racing 

earlier in the day for the final two races 
of the season because of a Friday night 
run-In with police 

Chase leader Tony Stewart finished 
in fourth, and now holds a 52 point 
lead ovet Jtmmie Johnson, who finished 
seventh Stewart also has an 87 point 
cushion owt Carl Edwards, who came 
into the race with two straight victories 
but finished sixth Sunday 



NBA I James reaches 4,000 



career points 

ORLANDO, Fla. — UBron James 
made history. Donyell Marshall helped 
make sure it came in a victory 

James became the youngest 
player In NBA history lo reach 4,000 
careet points and finished with 26 to 
help the Cleveland Cavaliers beat the 
Orlando Magic 108 100 in overtime on 
Sunday night 

James (20 years, J18 days) 
entered the game needing 10 points 
to pass Kobe Bryant (2 1 years, 216 
days) Aftet scoring on a jumper, two 
driving layups and a dunk, fames 
reached the milestone on a 21-focter 
with 587 seconds left In the first 
quarter 



I 









SYNOER TO ANNOUNCE RETIREMENT 



www. kstatecollt-giafi.com 

Woman 

restrained 

in movie 

theater 



ByLnnnSulsvn 

"WAS SMTKOlliGIAN 

A woman was restrained in the 
Seth Childs Cinema early Monday 
morning, Capt John Doehling with 
the Riley County Police Depart- 
ment said. 

Doehling said a cleaning crew 
employee was confronted by an 
unknown white male suspect with 
a handgun The suspect asked the 
whereabouts of other cleaning 
crew members, and the victim said 
she didn't know where they were, 
Doehling said 

The victim was then restrained 
Doehling said, but he could not 
umenton the method 

r the suspect left the room, 
the victim broke loose and ran to 
the RCPD building at about 6:20 
am., Doehling said He said she 
was not harmed 

RCPD officers responded imme- 
diately and surrounded the theater 
to search fur the suspect. Doehling 
said the suspeel wasn't found when 
police cleared the kuh shortly af- 
ter 10 am 

It is unknown if anything was 
stolen or what the suspect was af- 
ter, Doehling said The case is still 
under investigation 



Instructor 

recuperating 

at home 



By Abby Brown back 

KANSAS SlATKOUtOi AN 

Almost five weeks after suffer 
ing a brain aneurysm, a K-State 
Spanish instructor is recovering at 
home. 

Ines De La Torre Ugarte spent 
three weeks at the Via Christi Re- 
gional Medical Center in Wichita 
and one week at Mercy Health 
Center after her Oct. 12 aneurysm. 
She was released Nov. 8 

Fernando Ugarte, her husband 
and a general surgeon, said doctors 
performed procedures to stop the 
bleeding and did three angiograms. 
An angiogram, Fernando Ugarte 
said, is a procedure in which doc- 
tors inject dye into the brain s ar- 
teries in order to examine the ar- 
teries He said his wife underwent 
brain scans nearly every day while 
hospitalized in Wichita, 

tines De La Torre Ugarte said 
e was given last rites while in the 
•spital 

"The first week was a very dif- 
ficult week and they thought I was 
going to die." she said 

Fernando Ugarte echoed his 
wife's sentiments 

"I didn't think she was going to 
survive," he said "The feeling that 
I have is that I've been bom again 
I think it was a miracle she sur- 
vived," 

Dr. Fauna Radhi, a neurologist 
with Neuroscience Associates, said 

S«f INSTRUCTOR Piat 8 



Story, Page 8 



KANSAS STATE 




IAN 



Tuesday. November 1 5. 2005 



INSIDE 

Technology gets 
smaller, more 

Bub Eup Date 
Kaiwm State H ; IJaety 

tion 
PO B . 

Topeka KS 6>_ 




No 62 




Web site domain names 
cause LSAT confusion 



Houston-based Test Masters 




Santa Monica, Calif.-based TestMasters 




By Logan C, Adams 

KANSAS iFAttLOLltGIAN 

What i difference a simple 

singk space can make for stu- 
dents pre] . i,m 

i ence 
between the names od 

courses tor the [.SAT lh< 

required for admiaaia law 

school They are TeatMasti 
firm based in Santa Moi 
lit, and | , 

Houston. 

In October, 17 students at 
Hunter College in Manna 
NY, dropped out of the H 
ton-based compar , e af- 

ter learning they weren't taking 
classes with the eompanv : 
wanted They filed ci 
with the New Ybrfc State Con- 
sumer Protection Hoard, which 
issued a warning station 
Masters was exploiting the simi- 
larity of the companies names 
The Santa Monica firm has been 
teaching LSAT pre 
since the firm was started in 199] 
by Robin Singh, who tuts taken 
the test 25 times since 1988 and 
scored in the top percentile each 
time The Firm also posts LSAT 
scores for all ul us instructors 
on its Wtfa eft 

S0.com and wwtatestmes- 
tin nft 

Tin Houston firm started in 
1991, according to Hi manage, 
ment, or in 1442 according to 
the consumer protection board 
but taught preparation tut 
like the SAT and othen 
LSAT. It only started offering 
help with the law school teal , M 
2003, according ti from 

(he board, and does not list any 



•Jty 
<1 said in .i release 
thai 'hi Houston firm has b 

'laving the domain 
1 

when students are loo 
LSAT help from the mo 

the Hi.' 

the Houston 

speua .is name at one word at 

Mfebatts and it 
similar colors and layout to the 
mil Monica firm's Website 
Sharon Nairn, legal counsel 
lot the Santa Monica firm, said 
thel Inn used to operate 

"" ■> and then started 

oflering classes nationwide She 
laid the Houston firm uses loi 
proper scheduling techniques. 

-•t Up classes all over 
the country, then cancel that. 
iltat don't get enough students 
Nairn said 

ROfO hvani, president of the 
■ton firm, objected to Nairn's 
accusations 

irrecC be said "I 
don't think she has access to our 
enrollment figu 

Nairn also said the Houston 
and its faculty don t have 

enough experience with LSAT 
preparation, She said they often 
used teachers who have never 
taken the test 

Esretll said ever\' DM ol bis 
company's teachers has taken 
either an actual or practice exam 
and passed 

The two companies have 
been to court twice in smis over 
ownership of the trademark, and 
I totuton film has come out 
on lop so far, but a new case is 
pending The Santa Monica finn 

SeeTtSTMASTHttrajt*. 



Computers, electronics create opportunities for students to recycli 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS SMTKMLEOIAN 

More than 1 million com- 
puters are thrown into the 
trash every year, according to 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency. 

Prom computers and paper 



rs and sidewalks, EPA of 
ficials said recycling is break- 
ing back into the mainstream 
and into American households, 
though tons of items are still 
thrown away each year. 

With today being the ninth 
annual America Recycles Day, 
environmental groups across 



the country are preparing sig- 
nificant efforts to collect paper, 
plastic and other recyclable 
goods. 

Though Manhattan has 
no official plans to celebrate 
America Recycles Day, a proc- 
lamation originally approved 
by President Bill Clinton, one 



county official said he empha 
size the importance of partici- 
pating in the local efforts 

"This fall, we launched our 
first e waste recycling pro- 
^ud Dennis Peterson, 
director of the noxious weed 
department and household 
hazardous waste facility in Ri 



ley County 

The program focuses on 
recycling electronic goods, in- 
cluding computers, cell phones 
and MP3 players 

"It kind of came down 
from a nationwide basis, 

5« RECYCLING Paat I 






Today 






High 41 
Low 22 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Wednesday 




High 46 
Low 2) 



Gas explosion 

Pal Clawson, 81, and Janet Clawson, 
67, were Wiled early Monday morning 
In a natural gas explosion at a house 
In Clearwater, Kan Tim Mlllspaugh, 
the Sedgwfrt County fire marshal, said 
they were apparently asleep when 
the explosion occurred about 4 a,m. 
The one-story house was leveled by 
the blast. 



Poachers wanted 

Authorities were searching Monday 
for three men who may have been 
involved in the stabbing of Marvin 
Macy, 66, after he reportedly confront- 
ed them about poaching a deer on 
his land Macy is in serious condition 
at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita 
with tsntre wounds to his abdomen 
and face. 



Fraudulent marketers 

Western Union financial Services will 
post warnings to customers about 
fraudulent tele-marketers who are 
requiring consumers to wire money 
because It Is harder to trace, according 
loan agreement Monday with 47 
stare attorneys general. 



DON'T FORGET 



Miguel Caraballo, lead 

singer of The Rest of Us will 
play at 7 tonight in Union 
Station 

Steve Taylor, percussion, 

and Kelly McCarty, bass, will 
perform at 7:30 tonight in 
All farms Chapel 



The Peace Corps will meet 
from noon to I p.m. today 
in the Union Courtyard. Re- 
turned volunteers will share 
stories of their time In Latin 
America, Africa and Asia. 



R 



/ 






-*— 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






Tuesday, Nov. 15,2005 



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50 Arm bone 

51 Dig 
celeb ra- 
in in 

52 Pismire 

53 Trawler 

IJi'JI 



DOWN 

1 Tower 
city 

2 Slonlorian 

3 Possesses 

4 Cushion 

5 Big-nosed 

6 In 

pre- swan 
mode 

7 Two in 
Tijuana 

6 Shapely 
mies 
compari- 
son 

9 Existence 
(Lai) 

10 Differently 

11 Parlia- 
mentarian 

16 Gilligans 

home 
20 Bleating 

sound 



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21 "60 
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starter 

22 Witness 

23 Diego 

24 Thickness 

25 Doctrine 

26 Make 
marginalia 

27 Harvest 
goddess 

28 Work 
with 

29 See 

31 -Down 
31 With 
29-Down, 
Riviera 
patrons 

34 With it 

35 Starter 

37 Serf 

38 Thick 
slice 

39 Pop 
flavor 

40 Is conlnKi 

41 Caution 
42"Spama 

lor 

creator 

43 Carry on 

44 Historic 
times 

46 Figure 
head'? 
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11-15 CRVPTOQllP 

f W S V l D h 1: K w s 

IKXXHBV D a 1 1; i; S Q EUKV, 

DKHBVSQ isyi) U DWFMKSQ 

"KWHK 1 l) II G I- K 1- A I M Y V 
Yeatenfaiy'i Crvptoqulp: if- AN OLD ELFIN 

1HOI [ RFC i AN GOING til I ON THK TOWN A 

ft Mil HI \ Ml iKO-CiNOMli'' 

■» Crj ptoquip Clue: K oqmb T 



STREET TALK 

If you had a theme song, what would it be and why? 




Vieselmeyer 




"Girls Just Want to 
HaveFun/becausellike 
to go out, party and 
hang out with my girls' 

KrifU Vleselmeytr 

FRESHMAN IN GUM HI \S 
ADMINISTRATION, W PRO 
(ISSIONAl 



"Peace of Mind' by 
Boston, because it's my 
favorite song" 

WIIIV»nk«y 

SENIOR IN INIERIOHARCHI 




Hayen 




"Motley (rue's Dr. 
Feelgood.' t don't know 
why but somehow it 
seems to summarize 
what I leel most of the 
time." 

Brrnic H»yen 
MANAbtMINI INS1RJCI0K 



"'Stairway to Heaven,' 
because it's a really 
good song " 

Jennifer Louk 

SENIOI! IN INTERIOR ARCHI 
TEtTUHf 



Van key 



Louk 



k. At 


"I'd have to say 'Ba by 


f ^% 


Got Back: 1 think ifs 


\ 


kind of self explanatory 




why" 


h 


ktyla White 


m 


FRESHMAN IN PRE PRO 


p 


MONAl SECONOARt 




MION 




"low Rider' because it's 
just bad ass" 

Sean He (man 
lUNIOHINAROIITECIURf 



White 



Heiman 




"I'd have jo go with the 
Knight Rider theme 
song, because It's just 
pure 70s funk " 

Sam Lada 

WANINANTHROPtH 
OGY 




"'Meant to live' by 

Swltchfoot, because I 
really like the meaning 
of it" 

Andy Kowal 

SENIOR IN MANAGEMENT 



Lada 



Kowal 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendat is the Collegian's campus 
bulletin board service. Items in the calendar 
can be published up to three times Items 
might not appear because of space con 
straints but are guaranteed to appear on the 
day of the activity. To place an item in the 
Campus Calendar, stop by Kedrie 116 and 
HII out a form or e-mail the news editoi at 
(oltegian@spub.hu.edu by IT a.m. two day^ 
before it Is to run 

■ A topic research class will be from 10:30 
to 11 :30 a.m. today In Hale 408. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dissertation 
of Haiqing Vi at 1 p m. today In the Chemis 
try/Biochemistry Building 437. 

■ The Business Council will meet at 830 
tonight In Calvin 202. 

■ 'In the Situation... Know the Informa 
tion* will be at 7 tonight in the Big 1 2 room. 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this 
space. If you see something that should be 
corrected, call news editor Kristen Roderick at 
532-6556 or e-mail colleqian^ipub.lauedu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 201 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State University, 
is published by Student Publications Inc., Kedzie 
103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is 
published weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer Period* 
cal postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66S02 
POSTMASTER' Send address changes to Kansas 
State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 103, 
Manhattan, KS66S06 7167 
o Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County 
Poke Department's dally logs The Collegian 
does not list wheel locks or minor traffic viola- 
tions because of space constraints. 

Thursday, Nov, 10 

■ Christopher McBride, 292S Hickory Court, 
was arrested at 10 25 a,m for abuse of a minor 
Bond was set ai$ 1,000. 

■ Stephanie Rogers, 708 Dondee Drive, Apt. 6, 
was arrested at 1 2: 3 5 pm. for worthless check 
and fa i I uie to a p pea r B o nd was set at $899. 

■ Matthew Lowry, Overbrook, Kan., was 
arrested at 1 30 p m for burglary, possession of 
a simulated controlled substance or unlawful 



possession of drugs and paraphernalia Bond 
was set at $6,000. 

■ Charles forgy, lopeka, was arrested at 1:30 
p.m for burglary. Bond was set at $5,000 

■ Michael Jones, 3034 Powers Lane, was 
arrested at 3:24 pm. for arson, Bond was set 
at $2,500. 

■ Casey ilndley, 4736 freeman Road, was 
arrested at 7:50 p.m. lor battery and criminal 
restraint Bond was set at $1,000. 

■ Colene Lovin, Ogden, Kan., was arrested at 
8.20 p.m for worthless check Bond was set 
at 5500. 

■ Daniel Anderson, LI Dorado, Kan., was 
arrested at 9:15 p m. for criminal threat. Bond 
was set at $1,000 

■ Ben Pueft, 4090 K- 1 8 Bypass, was arrested at 
9:20 p.m for battery Bond was set at $500 

■ Andrew Schuler. 406 Osage St., was arrested 
at 1 1 p.m. for driving with a suspended license. 
Bond was set at $1,500. 



■ Sterling Pond Manchester, N.H , was ar- 
rested at II 30 pm for criminal trespass. Bond 
was set at $750, 

Friday, Nov. 11 

■ Marshall Hawk in son, 925 Colorado St., was 
arrested at 8:40 a.m. for failure to appear. Bond 
was set at $750 

■ Peter Kunze, 524 Edgerton Ave, was arrested 
at 2:15 p.m. for probation violation. Bond was 
set at 5500 

Saturday, Nov. 12 

■ Janea Humphrey, Lakewood, Colo, was 
arrested at 12:32 a.m. for DUI Bond was set 
at$7S0. 

■ Virginia Wynn, 1819 Rockhifl Road, was 
arrested at 2:50 p.m. for violation of protective 
order. Bond was set at $1,000, 



■ Jennifer Boeding, 2456 Vaughn Drive, was 
arrested at 4:20 p m for failure to appear Bond 
was set at 5 100 

Sunday, Nov. 13 

■ Kenneth Seldon, function City, was arrested 
at 12:50 p m for failure to appear. Bond was 
set at $600 

■ Shea Torre*, 1203 Colorado St. was attested 
at 1:5$ p m for probation violation Bond was 
setat$S,0OQ 

■ Jason Leonard, Denton. Texas, was a nested 
at $ pm. for criminal restraint. Bond was set 
at$7S0 

■ Antoinette Timms, Junction City, was 
arrested at 9 p.m for theft Bond was set at 
$2,000. 

■ Antoinette Tim ms, Junction City, was ar 
rested at 10:15 p.m. for failure to appear Bond 
was set at $161. 



ONE HOUR MASSAGt 

$35' 

tnly KODYfTRST 

fWliE HOB ArvMrtor *«s 

(>■*) 1174100 




The K-State Chapter of Mortar Board 

honors these faculty members for their 
Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring. 



College of Architecture, 
Planning, and Design 

Honoree: Dr. David Seamon 
Dean Dennis Law 

College of Business 
Administration 

Honoree: Mr. Rodney Vogt 
Dean Yar M. Ebadi 

College of Engineering 

Honoree: Dr. Margaret Rys 
Dean Terry King 

Student Lift 

Honoree: Ms, Andrea Bryant 
Dean Pat Bosco 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Honoree: Dr. David Poole 

Honoree: Dr. Michael Wesch 

Dean Stephen White 

College of Education 

Honoree: Ms. Dm Clarke 
Dean Michael Holen 

College of Human Ecology 

Honoree: Ms. Sharon Kay Morcos 
Dean Carol Kellett 



Tuesday, Nov. 1 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Professor publishes 3rd book 



By Megan Green 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Wayne Coins, assistant profea* 
SOI nl intisR. published Itis third 
book in September 

The book, "A Biography of 
( hula- Christian, |a// Guitar's 
King of Swing," is about jazz gui- 
tar player Christian, described 
by Goins as "the greatest guitar 
player in the world," 

The book details Christian's 
hie and his ueeomplishmenis, 
starting with his birth in Texas 
and following his rise to besom- 
ing one "l lh« tusi to play with 
g white band Goins also wrote 
about when Christian played gui 
tar with K- Stale students m 1937. 
1 1 look two years to finish," 
Coins said "One year of research 
and then one year to write 

In writing the book. GofalS 
and co-author Craig \k Kinney 
interviewed people who knevi 

Christian, including |uv Mi 

Shann. Count Bask and mem- 
of Kenny Goodman's band 
Goins and Mt Kinney did 1 all tlu 
interview w. which 

they nblained t'roin Rutgers Llni- 
versiiy rhe Rutgers interviews 
bad never before been published 

Goiri with Christian i 

daughter, and she gnve him 

<it Christian's ramify All 
(Ik si in tums are in the book. 

'I unite all ol 

lig talked to Christian I 

brother Clarence and we shared 

and then In lell in love with 

rtie" 

Gums laid RQ American has 

<k about Christian 

ud his book has the most 

(borough information on him 




Wayne Goins' book signing 

When: 7 p.m. Dec. 2 
Where; Manhattan Am Center 

It was an incredible learn 
fog experience and definitely the 
hardest thing 1 vc done he said 
"We had to do so much digging 
but in the process found so roan} 
treasures." 

While researching, Goins dis- 
red i hat former K-State pro- 
fessor Mall lie! ton who was one 
'>l the founders of K Stale jazz 

education, look students Lo meet 

and ptay with Christian. 

Un Oct 29, Goins was recog- 
nized for bis contribution! to the 
Black Liberated Arts Center and 
to Oklahoma hi 

The lady who gave tin. 
stood up a2 the banquet and said 
that because of the bonk we had 



Wayne Goins, 
assistant profes 
sot of music 
published a 
book that took 
him two years to 
finish. The book 
was his third 
book and Is titled 
"A Biography of 
Charlie Christian, 
Jazz Guitar's King 
of Swing." 

Chiiitophcr 
Ha new inckcl 

SUN 



pui Oklahoma Cm on the map.'' 
Goins said III never lorget 
that" 

Goins attributes his love for 

Christian to his lo\e oil he guitar, 

Goins has recorded more than 24 

ud has played all around 

(he Lulled Slates He ncenlly 

started hi- own record company, 

Little Apple Records 

i since l could en 

was 

"I don't remember not know- 
ing hm\ to play It's all I've • 
wanted to do l owe rnyerrtii 
to that instruiu 



Informal fraternity recruitment 
allows men to look into greek life 



By Hannah Crippen 

KANSAS MAlKOIUGIAIi 

A week of semi- formal Era 
tcrntU recruit m ei it began with 
Monday Night Football 

Greek Affairs designed at 
livities for each night this week 
that will give independent men 
the opportunity to learn more 
about K State fraternities. 

th> Monday, prospective 
new members watched football 

in the K State Student Union 
and met with fraternity recruit- 
ment chairmen 

Tonight, potential new mem 
bers will play basketball with 
current fraternity members and 
K- State mens basketball play 
ers at the I'eters Recreation 

Complex 

Before Wednesday's K- Si ate 

volleyball game I here will be 
a barbecue in the parking lot 
across from Memorial St a 
diutn. A raffle at Ihe game will 

give tree K-Stai. Msket- 

h;ill tickets In R potential new 

member. 

"I'm looking forward lo I 
Wednesday because it's a re 
ally relaxed and SOCial environ- 
ment," Michael Ruhr sopho- 
more in business administi ation I 
and assistant recruitment i nail ! 

ill Alpha Tan Omega Evety- 



Semi formal fraternity 
recruitment 

When: 8 tii 10 ton Kjht 

Where; Mm Reueatiwi Compta 

How much: Free 

ite 
On Thursday, individual 
fraternities will RAVI recruit 
men! events at theii hi 
loin Savastano sophomore In 
psyi hology and Interfratemit) 
Council execulivt ret ruitmenl 
officci said this is a waj foi po 
tenii.il ncM 

acquainted with the houti 

,i mo re pi | [SIS 

i ins week is .1 new pro 
for men who did nol participate 
111 recruiimenl in the fall 

Must (ratemitj recruiimenl 
is done in ibe summer through 



I lew meetings with eertan 

houses 

I Ik guys parlitipaiuig the. 
week really h ivs a great advan 

ovei the guys who rush* ■ 
in Ihe fall because ihej can baa 

their ilccistons on more than a 

few meetings with one guv ovei 
the summer; said Vdam Work 

iuiiioi iti pre professional ai 
chitccrural engineering and re 

1 1 h ni chairman foi Sigma 

Nil 

Savastano said the traiemi 

lies can recruit as a community 

V\, ,11. starling lo us, 

communitj lo n itential 

new members, rather than de 
pending on individuality," b> 
said "The K-Sl coin 

iminitv is something not found 
hi niher p| 



KSU Theatre & Dance and 

the Department of Music 

Present 



REMINDER TO 



k si \|| t ONN1 CTION( lit PHONE 
si BSCRIBERS 



nc on the K -Slate Local Plan ($3* ,K > 

..-I rhanksgiving, your minutes do not apply, If you use 
\ihii phone outside o( Ihe Kansas ires, you vuti incur 
charges 

Please call out office .it $32-7001 if you need additional 
information 



Gar : Eye Cave- CLottung - 

• Planning • Service * E^e Care • 



Your Service 
Here 



the musical 



ing 

•L.a.: 



Tsin 



31111 ■ Pianung bervice 
Oil Change- Auto Car Eye 

. : 



November 1 7-1 9 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



n Oi $14. 95 

Ekart 

\utoutofdve S«r\ ivr* 






W« SafVK* A|IM»W: 



■ 
■ 




776~5 1 10 A 1 I S Sth St. » 1 6lk. North of ft. Riley 81 vd 



book by 
Roger O.Hirson 

Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public: $13.50 



music and lyrics by 
Stephen Schwartz 



GodsP ei 



McCain Box Office 
t 532-6428 weekdays 

ked 11 :00a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

www.ksu.edu/sctd 




Get your own shout out foi- just 



Come to 103 Kedzie or call 532-6S55 



The Office of Student Activities and Servicers offers 



(20 wtirdA 



FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 



Nvix 



- 



i<jr(*ft«ft/WOSll tiffin 



Students' Attorney 

SARAH BARR 

785-532-6541 

Call now for an appointment 



i>nV*i lujkir* 

Monday - Friday 
B:00 - It :O0 am «• 1:00- 3:00 pm 

Q#^assf MMpsssilllHessWiss <sW*aya>a)a> tfpgm i^aHJejgl- 






fBrmef lnsslsfMa nhM 

tells his stars 



UPCOMING EVENTS 



Program Council 



Tuesday, November 15 



Tuesday Night Buzz: Miguel Carabailo 

7 pm, Union Station, Ground Floor, free coffee and treats! 



Wednesday, November 16 



Lunchtime Lounge: Featuring the KSU Dance Department 
Noon - 1 pm, Union Courtyard, Ground Floor 



Friday, November 18 



After Hours: Ego Imaging, Mega Flix, and Freaky Snapshots 

8 pm - midnight, Union Courtyard, Ground Floor 
Film: "Hustle and Flow," 8 pm, Forum Hall, Ground Floor, $1 



Saturday, November 19 



Film: "Hustle and Flow," 7 & 9:30 pm, Forum Hall, Ground Floor, $2 



Sunday, November 20 



Film: "Hustle and Flow," 8 pm, Forum Hall, Ground Floor, $2 



bbwmbbb is n 

TBBSB3U 8n 
LITTLB JBB3JBB 



! 



VICTOR If All V II William T. Kemper Gallery 
MOM tilt A LATVIA 



Student Photography Competition 
Exhibit: October 31-November 18 



Attention film makers: Check 
out www.k-state.edu/upc for informa- 
tion on the Little Appleo Film Festival. 





www.k-slalf.edu/upc 

UPC hotline: 532-6572 

UPt plume: 531-6571 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm& 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Nov. 1 5, 2005 



TO THE POINT 

Campus should 
be more aware 
of testing scams 

A scam that could potentially a 
K State students thousands of dollars is 
coming to campus - and the university 
is virtually unaware of it 

t )n Dec. 17 and 18, Test Masters, a 
Houston-based LSAT 
preparation company, 
will be in Manhattan 
to administer a class 
for students who plan 
to attend law school. 
On its Web site, the 
company lists the 
phone number for 
K- State general infor- 
mation and says the 
class is scheduled to be 
in Anderson 9, a room 
used by K-State Media 
Relations and Market- 
ing. 

The company is a 
parrot of California-based TestMasters, 
a reputable LSAT preparation company 
that has helped aspiring law students 
since 1991. The less reputable company 
mimics TestMasters by using a simitar 
Web site, and has drawn complaints 
from dozens of students who have been 
duped into paying the $l,000-plus fee. 

Classes are sometimes taught by 
instructors who have never taken the 
LSAT, said TestMasters legal counsel 
Sharon Nairn. The Houston-based Test 
Masters has also been warned by the 
Mew York State Consumer Protection 
Board and has an unsatisfactory record, 
uding to the Better Business Bureau 
of Metropolitan Houston. 

K State may be unaware its infor 
niation is being promoted on the Test 
Masters Web site, but the university has 
a duty to protect its students from such 
scams. It must be proactive in doing so. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor They tan be 
submitted by e-mail to lrtttiwipab.isu.edu, or in person to 
Kedzte 1 16 Please Include your full name, year In school and 
major. Letters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited tor length and clarity. 



To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This Is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Girard 
Matt Gorney 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoza 
Alex Peak 
Catri na Rawson 
Krtston Roderick 
Dave Skratta 



lc 


M A I I ft 1 STATE. 

/OLLEGIAN 


MJJttfWW WaVO 

fMRMMCHW 


Johanna Santa* 

MANAGING CDITO 


Krlnon ftooarlc k 

NEWS E0I1M 


MattCtenwy 

torn IMF 


CaMna Raman 
■aWMM 


Mkhaol AaMord 

seoirrs t oitor 


Annatta Lawtaat 

iirr/GOVtmiM 


Abby Irmnback 

UMrVtWM 


Aiai p«aii 

THEtOGIEDITOI 


WMOKEMIM 


Anthony Mandou 

MfSENTIOTONtDm* 


Curtli Johnton 


Oava SltratU 

W4I1IFKCUCM 


Irad Simmon* 

IMMM 


Andy Wetter 

tSSUDMAKAttl 



CLASH OF THE COLUMNISTS 



CONTACT US 



Kansas State CoHegUn 

KediwlOJ 
Manhattan, KSM5U 

Display ads 532-6560 



Classified ads. 532-6S5S 

Newsroom 532-49S6 

rmwiijpufebu.edu 

Delivery problems 512-65SS 



Conflicting theories 



Few who follow evolution 
understand science behind it 




JONAS 
HOGG 



Let us all don war paint and file 
our leeth into points, fur evnlutiuii 
is in the news 
again. Never in 
recorded history 
has one word 
caused so many 
hemorrhoids, 

The pro- 
ponents of 
creationism, in- 
telligent design, 
deifk planning 
or whatever 
they're calling it 
thi.se days, think 
they have won a victory (they 
have not) and the congregation a1 
the Church of Evolution seems to 
think the Huns are outside, mak- 
ing ready lo pillage and bum 

Creationists wax bizarre wilh 
pseudo-science, and Evolution 
ists snarl back with all the venom 
of (he true believer Where is our 
logic now? 

While evolution claims the 
scientific high mad, the major- 
ity of its proponents know little 
to nothing about its workings 
Deep down, most creationist and 
evolutionist ttlOUghl pal terns run 
equally shallow it is so because 
I read ii KUneWhere' 1 MM I II to be 
the common theme throughout. 

Perhaps 30 percent of evolu- 
tionists can ramble off something 
about genes and mutation or the 
fossil record, maybe 2 percent 
understand the hard science 

Most striking of those who 
claim the scientific high ground 
is a deep-rooted intolerance 

for the expression of other 
ideas. If evolution is so 
sound, why then, is there 
such hemming and 
hawing over opposing 

It seems to most 
that intelligent design 
is. as ■ sdence, eqtnW 
lent to astrology and 
dowsing rods But the 
edui nothing 

(o fear from bunk, and if 
astrologers were right, then 
I would be quiet and 
unnpinionated. 

lor what reason do sci- 
entists fear debate? It is only 
through discourse that science 
has progressed at all I EerettCS 
have challenged misinforma- 
tion since tunc imraemorieJ 
and have, occasionally, been 
burned at the stake for their 
troubles 

So loo, we see it now The 
Church of Evolution sits atop 
its podium, ever vigilant tot 
sounds of dissent The ritual 
is the Mne M die Cathi 
Church of Galileo's time 
ideas that are viewed as 
counter to accepted thought 
are silenced. 

It is not "these ideas arc 
twaddle" that is espoused, 
it is "these ideas shall not be 
spoken" Thus we are launched 
into a profane, rather than 
sacred, censorship 

And censorship it is. Perform 
a quick Google search for "< 
alienist" or "Intelligent Design 
Studies" and count the number of 
independent universities offering 
such a program. A similar search 
for "Queer Studies" reveals at least 
five U.S. universities that offer 
undergraduate programs, including 
such obscure academic grounds as 
Brown University, 

For whal reason? There are, 
statistically, more people who be- 
lieve in some form of creationism 
than there are "queers." Perhaps it 



is not considered as "free- think- 
ing" to study ereatiiauMii instead 
ill horuoseuiulity. 

I ike all true believers, the true 
believers of evolution seek no 
argument and leave no room for 
debate, But the glaring questions 
i hat confront evolution simply 
cannot he ignored 

To borrow from Fred Reed 
7 fredonevervthittjinet ) Has 
the cii ureiK e i >l life ever 

been demonstrated? Do we even 
know what would be needed for 
the chance formation of life? Do 
we have mathematJc proof that the 
spontaneous formation of life is 
probable in any conditions'' 

I volution is nol the theory in 
crisis some would like it lo be. But 
neither is it an iinmuiihlc fact Die 
recent decision to allow criticism 
in Kansas only sensical 

As academics, it is our charge lo 
question what in common knowl- 
edge, not devour it like zealots 



Jonas Hoog is * junior in sociology, Interna 
tional studies and Russian. Please send your 
com menu to opimon.aHpuh.kiu.tdu. 



Proponents of intelligent design 
not advocating good science 




DAVID 

LIANG 



In some ways, the rhetoric from 
a certain Seattle based think tank 
is similar to that 
of the former 
Iraqi informa- 
tion minis i 
Mohammed 
Saeed al-Sahaf 
Whether the 
slogan is "evolu- 
tionary theory is 
on the precipice 
of utter collapse" 
or "there are no 
American infi- 
dels in Baghdad, 

I you have gol lo be seriously 
deluded to actually believe what 
Ihc other party is saying. 

I am, of course, referring to the 
Discovery Institute, the nation's 
lore most champion of "intelli- 
gent design" - the new name for 
creationism Intelligent design pro- 
ponents contend life is too com- 
plicated to have been created by 
natural selection Ergo, a supreme 
being must have done the work 

It's a pretty nifty idea, hut 
there's one problem: It isn't sci 
ence. If one were to draw an analo- 
gy, their line of reasoning would be 
akin to the ancient Greeks saying, 
"Look, We cant explain lightning 
It must he /■■■• 

Nol surprisingly, intelligent 

design has never had much suc- 
cess in mainstream science Bui 
having been utterly defeated In the 
scientific arena, proponents of In- 
telligent design have bypassed ihc 
scientific community altogether, 
i 'housing, instead, to do direct 
marketing to the public and politi- 
cians using clever catch phr:: 
and slight of hand tricks. 

Their main contention is evolu- 
tion is a theory in crisis" and 
because of that, schools should 
leach i he controversy", namely. 
intelligent design 

In prove their case. I). 
Institute collected a list of 105 
signatures from scientists around 
the country on petition titled "A 
tJtlBc Dissent on Darwinism' 
1112001 

On it, signatories attested they 
were skeptical of natural selection 
to account for the complexity of 
life" 

One-hundred and five signa- 
tories, and about half of them 



biologists. Shouldn't that say some 
thing? 

Not so fast. 

When the National Center for 
Science Education contacted some 
of the signatories regarding their 
attitudes toward evolution and 
common decent, they found many 
if (hose who signed the petition 
weren't supporters of intelligent 
design at all 

"I believe the genetic evident c 
(for evolution) is overwhelming," 
said one. "1 am not a creation i si 
and have no reason to doubt com- 
mon descent," another said 

So how did the institute come 
lap with the 105 signatures 7 Clear- 
ly, it involved some underhanded 
Machiavellian trick - precisely the 
kind that has no place in academia 

Scientists argue aboul the 
details of evolution, yes. When 
exactly did Homo habilis evolve 
to become Homo erectus? Was it 
2 million years ago, or 1,7? That's 
ihe nature of science. Theories lor 
laws for that matter! are always 
being scrutinized; details arc con- 
stantly being refined 

In fact, evolution is probably 
one of the most solid theories 
in modern science Molecular 
biology as wc know it today only 
makes sense in light ol evolution 
The "controversy" that intelligent 
design proponents keep droning or 
about simply isn't (here 

But the point of contention hen 
isn I about science or evolution 
it never has been. In a widely 
publicised document referred lo as 
"the wedge" or "the wedge proiri i 
Discovery Institute plainlv slate 
their goals to reshape American 
public policy to reflect conservative 
Christian values, to "dekai scien 
line materialism" and promote a 
new idea of science "consonant 
with Christian and theistic convic- 

Sadly. a great deal of the public 
seem to have bought into their 
we're-only-dning-il-for-aeadeiim 
freedom charade The truth is not 
as innocuous, and no one knows 
it better than the intelligent design 
supporters themseh 



David Liana; is a graduate student in 
biochemistry , Pleas* send your comments to 




CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spu 



The Campus Fourum Is the Collegian's 
anonymous call-in system. The Fourum Is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 
»d IbekHft comments. The comments art 
not the opinion of the Collegian nor are 
they widened by the editorial staff. 

BUI Snyd»w- ** 1* • """T mUm 
single and I need somebody to support me. 
Since you've been supporting the football 
Mm far so long, send them to hell and 
let's get married I low you BUI Snyder. 

Its pretty sad that the CoHegiMrt own 



editor In chief throws his cigarette butts 
outside on the ground, and If s even sadder 
that the Collegian won't print it. 

Can you tell me why people call you at 
home and ask the question 'where you at?" 

The Collegian says today's high Is 8S 
degrees. The Weather Chanwl says tt will 
be 62 degrees. Good thing 1 never believe 
anything written In the Collegian. 

What It there was a Hftvt powered by 

darkness. Would It ever be able to 



turn cm? Would It ever be off? 

Its a goedj tMnf that they give us out 
school IDs because we have to have them 
for everything. 

I lost my gallbladder at Mercy Regional 
Hearth Center. 



A masked man once stabbed Chuck 
NorrH in the alley behind a children's 
hospital. The knife bled lo death 

I miss my gallbladder. Sad face 



In response to Hit person criticizing, via 
Fridays online Fourum, the guy with the 
left ear piercing and the "all or nothing' 
Made shirt: He is an amazing person with 
a great sense of humor and amazing 
guitar skills — and he definitely has more 
Integrity and character than most guys 
walking around this campus. I consider 
myself privileged to he his friend 

When will people quit talking about the 
2001 football season and realize K State 
sucks? 



PutSprolesln. 

Why Isn't the Internet working! It's 

pissing me off so much . It should be on, 
because that's what the Internet's for, 

Stephen Colbert sold It best, what Is 
there to learn In Kansas? Apparently, not 

a lot. 

ResNet, you're the most slipshod orga- 
nization on campus, Frankly, I don't want 
you controlling my computet anymore, 

you suck. 



It's official — Bill Snyder's first two 
seasons, no bowl games. His latest two 
seasons, no bowl games Full circle, Irs 
time to let him go, we need some new 
blood. 

Sejmjiirt curious. Would you buy a 
gummy penis extender? 



?Co» 






form* 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 




HOLLY 
KRAMER 



Tuesday, Nov. 15,2005 

Sex toy 

purchase 

important 

decision 



(■inding the right erotii 
isnol ,ni eat) u>k You iikiv 
hive In deal 
with sleaxy, 
hole-in-the- 
wall now I 
shops, finan- 
cial limitations 
, roducts 

or 
nol work. 
When you find 
i(h' on* i hiii 
l, fits and 
i feel 
hoi. it's the 

i Lho perfect 
pair hi jeans 
Some wi 
ili*.- tiny, tipsti 

iimll, 

pact and perfect for a little 

■ el Mih in ,i i .if when i 
think you're sleeping. 

s, . ■ ni 

KM in ii' I 

. olors and wen 

ills. 

■ e l hadn't ventured out 

for 
guilt* sunn- tin iend mid 

i 
using our highly, d< 

■ it $c ientli 

Ii was i noble qui 

rl the tnedioi i 
gel tn the extraordinary, until it 
ime son of lil ill Dar 

i < inlj It 

pic 
taking over, il rl sup* 

rior electronic equipment that 

would trulv win ui ii" survival 

of the quickiM 
The old I 

choo hold 

up to your no klea, 

then 

in addition >• i! ■ 

uhatli > 

questions to help in In 
sioii Hi 

tuai 

al Ui loo] 
■ 
ningbird ehap< 
ni)i 'nl. 

old ■ ilistk fei ■ 

dildo 
Tin 

rl ol shop] 
for toys and don't feel bad il 11 

Never Blind ill 

i direction as 
shape and consistency Ign 
the creepv old gentleman who 
ski i 
Etke vaginas arc Vow jre a 
won H rmportani ml» 

i and can'i afford to be eas- 
ily distracted 

made That im 
portanl decision, females might 
lingerie 
• •..•• ■ ced 

ther mil 
thai could be coupled nice- 
ly with something from the S & 
M part ol tin unpletc 

mklc 
id a leather gimp 
rk, you can res I assure your 
trite sexually deviant cquip- 
i tan be matched with a 
la outfit 

• mxing ,i leather whip, 
my friend and 1 bravely went 
red lube and vari* 
mis erotic oils section. This was 
! to inlcrprct 
While everyone needs In 
from time to lime, 

does it really hiVfl lo uMtt like 
bananas or coconuts? Chances 
Ut it would just confuse the 
lion at hand (and other 
body parts) and end up being 
joked about at parties 

All good things must come 
to an end, and after purchasing 
some unmentionables, we left 
[lie store 

The experience was like 
most sexual encounters It 
started out thrilling, became 
confusing and ended with 
a nice mixture of elation 
and shame. And if that's not 
enough to make a trip out to 
Abilene, Kan , worth every mo- 
ment, I honestly don't know 
what is. 



Holly Kr»m*r It > tumor in human ecology 
and mm tommunl cat ions you tan e mall 
her it tdgt&tpub.kui.edu. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 






, New technology 
changes 
product size 



By Amy Bolton 
KANSAS MATI (UIUGIAN 

ide product! keep 
shrinking, 

New releases on the market, such as the 

id Nintendo's Game Boy Micro, 

arc examples of superior products in a smaller 

I Loehr, the manager ol the K Stale 
Student Union Computer Store, said the new 
iPod Nano, which is replacing the IPod Mini, 
flash memory instead of hard drive mem- 
Willi B hard drive there are moving parts 
lhat could break il the iPod is dropped, but 
Ihc flash memorj uses static memory, which 

it memory is inort 
pensive, but you don't have to worry about it 
suiJ 
The il'oil N;in,i also has color screens and 
, mi 
screen, while 



the 
the 

a 



Phew by Christopher H»newlnckel (CO 
Gum Boy Advance SP, 3 V x I ii" 1 0.96" 




iPod Mini has 
monochrome 
screen and can't 
show phot 

Th< ■ roes 

in tw> I a two 

gigal- holds 

about jOO songs 
and a 4GB thai 

The 
■ i price is 
d (be MSB 

i> $249, but 
the education dis 

.•Hint student:' 

ftpUt 
cost 
and $229. re- 

Christa Beach, 

she 
i buying 
the new il\>d ' 

e to get the 
IPod Mill 

"I wenl li 

buy it Beach said. 

"They showed me 
tile Nano and the 
Mini and I didn't 
like how smalt the 

utowatd, |u- 
nior in humanities, said 
he d myone who has had trouble 

with tin IPod Minis breaking 

I I, ally heard of anyone having 

i rouble with the hard i 

ri pretty handy from what I hear" 
Nini uiie Boy Micro is a new, small- 

er Game Boy than the Game Boy Advance. 

"It offers you the MUM teih oology as the 
Game Boy Advance hut smaller," John Lackey, 
lies specialist at the Manhattan Target, 
said. 

Lackey said the new Game Boy Micro 
doesn't actually have any new technology, 
but it is smalt heavy He said 

about the size of the old Nintendo controls. 

Ttie new Game Boy Micro has been on the 
market fj nth or a month and a half, 

-ut the Manhattan Target has not 
. of them 

tails for $99, W, and 
rent faceplates users can 
r Micro more personal. 



Photo tommy of Applr 

iPod Nana, J.S'x 1,6" sO. 




NEW 
RELEASES 



Musk 





Madonna 




P.O.D./IhfWamorsfpVol 2" 
lurythmits, Bond* 
Madonna, Contest MOnaDeM! 
Floor 
Cam* 

Underwood. 
Seme Heart] 
Green Day, 
'Bullet In A foble 
Stuart Cassells 
(Performer), et 
al, H.itryl'ottei 

4 The Goblet ol 

Wiko, Kicking Television tiw in 

trntaqo" 

Jimmy Buffett, l we at Fenway Park' 

Big & Rich, LemUi tnVooiOty' 

Marian Carey, I lie I mancipation of 

Mimi Platinum Delime ftlilion" 

Alanis Motissette, I In- tollertlon" 

Madonna, rtunqUp 

The Moody Blues, I a. ly to Ve You 

live (mm th? Greek 

Rod Stewart, I hi- EMI American 

Brute Springsteen, Bom to Run: 50th 

Anniwts.iiy t 

Disc 

Original 

Soundtrack, 

"Walk the Imi? 

loggins & 

Messina 

Sittiri in Again 

at S,inta Barbara 

Bowl Springsteen 

A- Ha, An.ii 

RoineStolt, W,il: ■ 

Source Amuon, com 



Movies in theaters Friday 

Harry Potter and Goblet of Fire 
rated K 13 
Qui younq hem Han 

i 

relatives to relumloHucnv.il 
WitchcratUnd Wi;,> 
Harry hats a disturbing ■■■■ ion. Km 
LofdVokoemon and I ."lowers 

him Harry is underst, mutably on edge 
He contacts his godfather. Sirius 
for help 

-Walk the Line" rated! 

ThK biopic about Johnny Cash stars 
Joaquin Phoenix as the legendary 
country Kon and ttuuses on the singer s 

leenn Merrm 
rm struggles with drug add 
fleese Wit he rspoon stars as his w * 
bandmate. June Carter Cash 

Source Movlei.go.com 



DVD Releases 

'MadMStcsi 

Friends ■ The 

Complete Tenth 
Season" 

"Charmed - The 
Complete Third 
Season'' 
"U2 \ta 
2Q0S • Live from 
Chicago" 
"The Sound of 
Music l40thAnnivei> 
"The Oprah Winfrey Show 20th 
Anniversary DVD Collection 
"Friends • The One with All Ten Seasons" 
"Siargate Atlantis The Complete Frrsi 
Season" 
"Scrubs • The 
Complete Second 
Season 
"Stealth' 

"U2- Vertigo 200S: 
live From Chicago 
DVD" 

The Skeleton Key 
( Wldescteen Iditlon)" 
"The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection 
Vols 1-3* 

"The Golden Girls: A Lifetime Intimate 
Portrait Senes" 

"Frasiet - The Complete Seventh Season" 
"Cheers ■ The 
Complete Seventh 
Season" 

"Journey live in 
Houston 1981 the 
Escape Tour" 
"Wal-Mart The 
High Cost of low 
Price" 

Source: Amann.com 
Photos: Courtesy an 






-. » » • t .*.» » >lVi 



.-..--.. 



Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Snyder to coach final game 



Catmm WwwBw 1 CBmfilM 
Coach 6111 Snyder talks with Allan Evridge on the K State sideline Saturday 
while the Wildcats played Nebraska in Lincoln, Neb. The Wildcats lost to 
the Huskers 27-25. Snyder will announce his retirement today at a weekly 
press conference after 1 7 years as the coach of the Wildcats. 



By Michael Ashford 
ttSTHtCOUKWI 

Coach Bill Snyder will 
coach his final game al K- Slate 
Saturday against Missouri. 

Snyder. K-Stale's til-time 
winningtsl coach with a nv 
68-1 record, is expected tu 
announce his retirement at to- 

I p .m. press conference, 
the Web site tvww.gopawercBi 
com reported Monday ni^hi. 

Tim Fitzgerald, editor Mid 
publisher oi hiwercal Illustrat- 
ed, of which www.gapourrtitt 
com is affiliated with, reported 
Snyder who is [tearing the end 
of his 17 ih year as head coach 
al K-Slate, will address The me- 



dia at his weekly press coiil'et 
ence about his retirement. 

Fitzgerald said his sources 
were from inside the program 

Snyder came in K-Stale in 
1988 and inherited a program 
mired in a 27-ganie winles* 
streak that would stretch to 
30 games The Wildcats were 
known as dm oi the worst 
programs in college foothill 

What Snyder did .it EC-State 
has since heen regarded U lb' 
greatest lurnaround in college 
football Uatorj 

He led K Stale to ita second 
bowl game in program history 
in 1993, the Copper Howl. 

Throughout the next 11 sea- 
sons, the Wildcats were a sta- 



ple in the top 25, and won 11 
games in six of seven seasons 
from 1997-2003 The Wildcats 
wen i to 11 straight bowl games 
from 1993-2003 Snyder was 
named National Coach of the 
liter the 1991, 1994 and 
1998 seasons. 

In 1998, Snyder steered the 
Wildcats to an 1 1 -0 regular 
season and a No. 1 ranking. 

In 2003, the program argu- 
ably reached its highest point 
when it defeated No 1 Okla 
homa 35-7 in the Big 12 Con- 
leience Championship, giving 
K-State its first conference title 
since 1936. 

No successor to Snyder has 
been named al this time. 




Correcting 
mistakes 

K-State men's golfers use fall 
season as preparation for spring 



Christopher Hanewinckat | (OufGlAN 
Senior golfer Ben Kern chips from the fairway during a match last season in Lawrence, Kan. The 
men's golf team finished the fall season on Oct. 24-25 at the Barona Collegiate Cup. 



By Cedrique Flamming 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

For the K-Slale men s golf 
team, some cleH g>>als are on the 
table for the lime between the end 
of the fall season, which wrapped 
up Oct. 24-25 at the Barona Col 
legiatc Cup, and the start of the 
spring schedule 

Specifically, the Wildcats have 
to make improvements in how 
they finish tournaments COldl 
Tim Norris said 

"Everybody haa improved from 
last season and we had ,i pretty 
good season." Norris t 
have put together two-owl ol three 
good rounds each time we go OUl 
and now the guy limig 

bow competitive college got! is 

i in wildcats highest finishes 

came at the Wolverine Interco! 

legjate and ihe Memphis Entercol 

legiate where they finished fourth 

in both tournaments. 

K-State averaged a score of 
287 in the first two rounds ol it-. 
tournaments litis season, with its 
lowest round of 279 coming al the 
Wolverine Intercollegiate 

The Wildcat! also Shot a 279 in 
the final round at Barona. but the 
average score for the final rounds 
this season was 292 4 

"We have to find I put- 

ting together solid tournaments 
where we don't have that one 
round knocking us out ol conlen- 
huii Morris said 

"We haven't had too many 
gimd final rounds, but the experi- 
ence has definitely been heir 
for us" 

Senior Ben Kern had the 
performance of the season for the 
Wildcats, which came at the Cleve- 
land State Invitational, where he 
shot three rounds in the 60s and 
placed second 

He shot five consecutive rounds 
in the 60s to begin the season and 
finished with nine rounds shoot- 
ing r>9 or lower 

Kern said he was pleased with 
his two top-10 finishes during 
the season, but said he has to fix 
a specific part of his game if he 
wishes to compete for more titles 



in the spring 

I here ire a lew rounds I 
would love (0 play over.' Kern 
said 1 know 1 could have played 
so much belter had it not been for 
im pulling, which is something 1 
have been trying to improve lale- 
lv 

Seniors Iyler Cummins and 
fonalban lames, sophomore Kyle 
Yonke and freshmen Joe Kinney 
and Robert Sti ill contrlb- 

10 the team to go along with 
the play ol Kern 

ike was (he low Wildcat 
al the Alisler -ie Invita- 

tional, placing 3.!nd ni Voeer-par, 
and l\li -r < mnmms took eighth at 
Memphis with a 2 -over- par 

I he play (roil i llu younger guvs 
on the team has been somewhat 
surprising, Kern said 

We are all pretty good play- 

Kerr) said Hut the freshmen 

guys did better than I expected 

They really stepped up when we 

needed them too." 

Streb had his best showing at 
Memphis, where his 5-over par 
was good enough to tie for 16th 

He said he M pleased with bis 

overall performance to start his 
collegiate career, but knows there 
are many things to correct to be- 
come a better goU 

"I played pretty well, but 
I would really like to cor- 
n-it some things and play bel- 
ter in the spring," Slreb said 
Over the winter I will be try 
ing to make a few swing adjust 
S and I will need to work on 
my putting a little." 

With cold Weather |ust begin 
iiing lo find its way to Manhattan. 
the Wildcats have taken advan- 
tage of the recent warm weather 
lo practice outside before having 

iove inside to the Brandt hi n \ 

Indoor Complex 

"I would rather practice outside 
because I can correct more of my 
problems on the course than in 
Hi andeberry, where we are limited 
to what. we can do** Kern said 

The Wildcats will begin the 
spring season Feb 13-14 at the 
Matlock Collegiate Classic in 
Lakeland, l : la 



Wildcats improve during fall season 



By Wendy Haun 

KANSAS SUTE Oil I ECIAN 

Although the women's golf 
team is only halfway through 
its ■mcoq, the Wildcats have 
already made good progress on 
some goals they had at the be- 
ginning of the year 

I wanted to improve from 
last season," coach Kristi 
Knight said. "1 wanted to play 
better, and they h-i 

Last season, the highest the 
team finished was fourth in the 
Ptarmigan/Ram Fall Classic in 
Collins, Colo 

So far, the K-State golfers 
finished second in the Chip-N 
Club Invitational Sept. 26-27 
in Lincoln, Neb., and third in 
the Marilynn Smith/Sunflow- 
er Invitational Oct 10-11 at 
K State's home course, Colberl 
Hills Golf Course 

A major highlight of the fall 
season came during the Sun- 



flower Invitational, when ju- 
nior Helene Robert look first 
place individually after a play- 
off hole 

Helene's victory was defi- 
nitely a highlight,*' Knight said 

Sophomore Michelle Regan 
agreed 

"A highlight was when He- 
lene went head-to-head with 
a girl from Nebraska for the 
tournament championship," 
she said 

"The whole team got to go 
and watch and we all got to 
see her play" 

Knight said closing strong 
was a focus for the fall and 
continues to be for the rest of 
the season 

I liked the way we 
responded in the final round 
in two situations," she said 

"The way we came back at 
the Nebraska and home tour- 
naments was posit i 

Knight said in the off-sea- 



son, she's going to alter other 
things 

"As a coach, I'm going to 
make some changes," she said 
"We have done some good 
things in practice, but 1 can 
see areas of practice that need 
to have more purp 

Robert said she plans to 
work hard in the offseason on 
her scoring. 

"I had one really high score 
[this fall), but I maintained a 
good average," she said. 

"My goal is not to go too 
high and have some top-10 
and 20 finishes" 

Robert is excited about the 
spring schedule, which 
eludes trips to Florida and Ha 
waii. 

"We have a really good 
schedule and meet a lot of 
good teams,' she said. 

"Being able to meet them 
and beat them would be amaz- 
ing" 




K- State's 
Helene Robert 
competes In 
the Marilynn 
Smith/ 
Sunflower 
Invitational at 
Colbert Hills 
Golf Course on 
Oct. 10. Robert 
earned a first 
place finish in 
the tournament 
at 1 -under par 
215. 

Catrlna 

Riwson 
{.OUEGIAN 






Tuesday, Nov. 15,2005 

SPORTS 
ONLINE 

Sports online, After Traveling to the_ . 

K- State vs. Nebraska football game this - 
weekend, columnist Mart Potter gives 
his opinion of K State football fans antl- 
how they stack op to Nebraska fan 
lo read Mark's column, goto wwi. 
itatrtoltrgian.im. 



NFL Scores 



Dallas 
Philadelphia 



tr 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

MLB | Rodriguez wins 
2nd MVP in three seasons 

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez, won 
the American League Most Valuable 
Player award for the second time in 
three seasons, 
beating David 
Ortiz on Monday 
In a vote that 
rewarded a 
position playet 
over a designated 
hitter. 

Rodriguez 
in his second 
season as 
the New York 

Yankees* third baseman, received 16 
first-plate votes, 1 1 seconds and one 
third for Bl points from the Baseball 
Writers' Association of America 

Ortiz, the DH for the Boston 
Red Sox, got 1 1 firsts and 1 1 seconds 
for 307 points. Los Angeles Angels 
outfielder Vladimir Guerrero received - 
the other first place vote and was tfujdl 
with 1% points 




Rodriguez 



TEN | Agassi loses, 
withdraws from Masters Cup 

SHANGHAI, China — Andre Agassi 
and Rafael Nadal withdrew ftom the . 
Tennis Masters Cup on Monday because . 
of injuries, 
leaving Roget 



Agassi 



Federer the only 
top five player in 
the elite field. 

And even 
Federer, the two 
time defending 
champion, might 
not go the 
distance Ihe 
top-ranked 
Swiss has a sore ankle 

Agassi lost 6-4, 6-2 to Ntkolay 
Davydenko and then pulled out after 
aggravating an injury to his left ankle 

NBA | Kings fined $30,000 
for Detroit- bashing pictures 

NEW YORK - Ihe Sacramento 
Kings were fined SiO.OOO by the NBA 
on Monday for showing derogatory 
images of Detrott on video screens 
prior to their home opener againit the 
Pistons 

When the Pistons were introduced 
Nov 8, the Arco Arena scoreboard 
flashed pictures of abandoned build- 
ings, burned -out cars, piles of rubble 
and other negative images of Detroit 
The Pistons won the game 102 88 

The Kings apologized that night 
and owners Joe and Gavin Maloof 
bought full -page ads thai ran in The 
Detroit News and Deirait free Press. 

NFL j Giants 2nd co-owner 
fighting terminal illness 

EAST RUTrttRFOKO, N.J -The 
New York Giants are dealing with the 
terminal illness of one of their co- 
owners for the 
second time 
In less than a 
month 

Robert 
Tisch, 79, who 
purchased SO 
percent of the 
team in 1991, 
has inoperable 
brain cancer 

On Oct. 25, 
Wellington Mara, who had co owned 
the team since 1 9 30. died ol cancel at 
89, 

His son John, the team's exetu 
me vice president and chief operating 
officer, has overseen the team's opera 
tlons for the last several years. 




Tlsch 



College Football 
BCS Standings 



t use 

2. Tent 

J Miami (Ha) 

4.hmSu» 

SISU 

t Virginia lech 

7. Otto Slate 

8 Alabama 

9 Notre Dime 
10. Oregon 

Other Big 12 teaim 
19, It ui Tech 
IS, Oklahoma 



.♦771 






2211 
.U* 






1 









t t i *_AJ**A* 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Tuesday, Nov. 1 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



II I I I ■ 
■■ H I j_l 



II II 



■ i I I I i 



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1704 Fatrview (785)317- 

77»3. 

LIVE ONLY half Mock from 

campus and walk lo class 
Huge one bedroom base 
"ifnt apartment S400 plus, 
(I'ectric (all other utilities 
paid | Available now with 
short term lease Emerald 
Property Manaqemoni 

1/85)556 8899 

MEW TWO BEDROOM du- 
plex , close to campus, all 
appliances lutmshed No 
smoWnfl, no pets. (786)539- 
i ^)313-B299 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
Bpartnenl Next to campus 
Vary nice Clean, quiet Wa 
let.' trash paid Parking pro- 
No nets (785)537 
7050 



NEW TWO-BEDROOM 

ground floor apartment m 
older homo maatt all co 
das. ne* indud- 

hwajaTtar, very nice, 
SIS Bluemont available 
January, no pets, laundry in- 
cluded. $830 plus utilities 
(785)31 3-0462, leave mes- 
aaga 



ONE-BEDROOMS $370 
$4>K) three bedrooms 

J700 $825 (785)537 7701 



STUDIO APARTMENT. 

$260' month All ulm 
cepl eiectnc paid Lease 
and deposit requited Avail- 
able December 1 . 
(7851537-77S4 



THREE BEDROOMS 

AVAILABLE now Close to 
campus Water' tiash paid 
Central an. coin-, i 

■ fJ5)537-7810. 
(785)537 2255 



TWOBEDROOM DUPLEX 

Available now lor snort-term 
lease Small pels okay 
I5S0. E mi aid Property 
Management ( 785)5 S6- 
6899 



1201 

For Rem 
Houses 



EVERYTHING NEW Three 
bedroom, two bath bouse 
with garage West ol cam- 
pus Available soon Emer- 
ald Property Management. 
(785)556-6899 



FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 

bath, iwo blocks (mm cam 
pus Washer/ dryer hook- 
ups Deck with gtitl Quiel 
neighborhood, nice yard, 
nice house $1400' month 
Available immediately Call 
(620)795-1933 or maloner- 
enlal® yahoo com 



HAVE YOUR own bath- 
room Four bedroom, lour 
hn in Walk-in closets 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
QUI In Aggipuilli« and Cam- 
pus Available now Emerald 
Properly Management 

(785)556-6*99 

THREE BEDROOM. 
THREE bkjLks south ol Ag- 
gievilie Spacious washer 1 
oTytfi stove, 'utrigeralor. 
central as $675 (785)537- 
9425 Of (785)532-4424. 



Roommate 
Wanted 



MALE ROOMMATE needed 
lor three -bed room house 
$200' month next to cam 
pus washer' dryer Avails 
tile now (913)579 2209 

Roommates needed tor 
tour-bedroom nmt to cam- 
pus. Two bath washer' dry- 
er, Sshwaahei No pets 
(785)537-7050. 



Sublease 




0321 

Shout 
Outs 

The Collegian reserves 
the right to edit or reject 
ad copy First or last 
names can be accepted In 
sd copy Pholo ID re- 
quired al placement Ads 
can be placed in 103 Ked 
tie Hall, $2 tor up to 20 
words. 



BRANDON S 

I got hitched I still think 
you'i< 

RRVAN C rjf riU (■■ ou» I m 

even 

looked lor yoi i 

DIAMONDS ARE forever' 
Sanyo's political views 

Might on ihe morwy. 



DOES ANYBODY leel like 

iV.li l.xiHi.l'l IfMfllS '-.II' kt ■■■' 

m i' I'JSl me Can we win an- 
other game this season 

I TRIED lo jump trom an or 
ange barrel but it tipped 
over tin mo Haip 

MAHY B wa lajt 
BOS 

MATT 6 ■ you are Ihe best, 
keep doing what you 

ha ii 

MY DOG ra/tt bul i was 

■ lad? 



RYAN- WHY Is you- 

TO MY goodnight hug bud 
dy. I heart you' 

TO THI ■ Union 

with the big butt keep wear- 

ay serve 

"itii 

WALTERS I knew someone 
>ur lady 
Cine » 1 keep loo> 

YAY FOR Alpha Xi I 




and outbuildings and 
I bob, and other good 
•rlktlile habitat i hs | 
will bt> divided in 
and sold in a manner which 
will allow purchase ot any nr 
all ol the iructs The divnrsi 



010 



Announcements 



N TO FLYI- K State 

Flying Club has live air 

planes and lowest rales 

(786)776 i f*A 

www ksu ectu 



i^HECK 

OUT Manhattan's favorite 

ml and bar websitu 

Lois ol specials, entertain- 

REAL ESTATE Auction 
Tuesday November 29 
2005 7 00 PM al SHrSsrwor 
(107 S Spnng Vol- 
Junction Ctty Kan- 
sas Location ol Property 
1JU2 McNeai Rd. Dwighl 
|Hh From 
ClJf. 6 miles east on 1-70 to 
HaTr*okll Creek Rd 81 ami 
ttO* then south 1 1 miles to 
M^Neai or Edwards Roads 
F»m there go south and 
irjns For 
rnjre maps rtrawings, pho- 
io* terms, and mora details. 
s«" a e 

■vartt^-'i'i^lAutliuii.Wjm M 
WW w,flr assan dgraln.com. 
See the Nov 8 issue ol 
Grass and Grain This prop- 
erty consists 554 acres ot 
, ol pasture There is 
■ mately 90 broke 
aces Thar* is a larm home 



day November 20tl 
- X) PM Buy 

Yout msper.non invited pnor 

in the :. 

and auctioneers no! 

sibks tor accidents < I 

lion tirm is a 

sellers Announcements 

rnaria MM oaj) left* preoe 

denoe civet printed matter 

RONALD L MCNEAt IS, 

TATE, seller 

ducted by Clay County Real 

Estate GREG KREI2 AND 

GAIL MAUSER MAN sales 

man and auctioneers 

0201 



Lost and Found 

Lost and found ads can bs 
placed tree lor three days 

0301 



Post a Note 

We require a form ot pic- 
ture ID (KSU, driver's II- 
canae or other) when plac- 
ing a post a note. 





1051 

For Rent- 
Apts Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account ot race, 
set. lam 1 1 la l status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age. color, national 
origin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources al City Hall, 
(785)587-2440 

flOafaafaaafaaafaafafl. 
Fot Rent- 
Apt. 
Unfurnished 

AVAILABLE SOOM 
Houston, 4 2 Throe-bed- 

Screened back pon > 
en appkances $69 
to downtown City Park and 
AggievlUe (765)539 2452 

GREAT DEAL 1 Studio apart 

IVIallWS J.ii i 
five or seven month (ease 
$340 all utilities paid 
1785)410.6361 ot 1785)341- 
4754 

MONTH MONTH leases 
Two-bedroom. $620 Three- 
bedroom, $620 1510 Col- 
lege Ave 17851537-209*. 

NH.-E- TWO FIFriROOM 
waking disiance Irom cam 
pus Water and trash paid 
Lease slnrts January tlrsl Of 

poialbly sooner i? 85)672- 

2317 



1101 

For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 



THREE AND tow bedroom 

Uss No 

pels l rt 



TWO OR three bedroom 

I lOM In rjlilji,!'- Sim ions 
central alt dishwasher. 
laundry facility Wafer and 
0866 




537-9064 

am hiBlwwtttttli'jnial.tom 



Whether you're buying or selling this fall, you can reach more than 
20,000 students and 5,000 faculty with the Collegian classifieds each day, 

Kansas State Collegian 

103 Kedzie 532-6555 




For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

1995 SKYL' I 14*52 with 

appliances «9O0O or best 

(1373 in Sali- 



2000 SCHULT 16«B0 
■'droom two bath, 
large deck, fenced lot #257 
Riverchase Reduced to 
snll Call (/8f.ibli4-09O4 Of 
1785)565-8292 

HOH'1 LOVERS, tw.. :■-".•■ 
room mobile home Barn 



FEMALE SUBI I 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please i mta i (785)556 
0169. 

ROOMMATES MALE or 
female pets okay Rant na 
gotiable Washer' dryer, 
large yard, one- third 
CaJ James i7H5i. u 7-5006 

SPRING SEMLSTLH .„;, 
leaser(s) needed KBh 
ckaan apartment Close to 
campus and Agi 
Cheap bills No deposil 
Discounted rent: S225/ 
month Can 1 16 
Available December 



SUBLEASEH NEEDED 
two-bedroom apartmeni. 
Chase Manhattai 
mciiK vVi'i jias .Unuary rent 
It signed by Decern i 
(785)871 07 M (7S5)87t 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Founders Hill, tour-bed- 
room S30U 75 a month plus 
Vtiry Nico' Call 
{785)317-1875 or ( 
5145 

SUBLEASERlS) NEFPrii 
One block Irom campus 1 
Water' trash paid Washer' 
dryei included Wanted lor 
semeslei Call 
(316)2*8*. 

SUBLEASING A iw,- [„.>( 
room close lo campus Fot 
more in lor mat ion call 
(620)2764940 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 
MENT $400 " 
Bertrand upper WMrVnenl 
From January Ifirough May 
ted, Call (620)719- 
6658 

TWO BEDROOM SPA 
CIOUS apartmeni sublease 
January 1 May 31 $i'd> 
person Dishwasher central 
heat/ air Five mmule walk 
ft (785)537-6880 



1601 



Office Space 

AGGIEV1LLE RETAi' 
space lor tease Han 
nor Shopping Centc* 
street parking (78515J U 
0350, 1766)313-2976 



145 I 

Roommate 
Wanted 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted Three- bedroom 
apartment halt block Irom 
campus $250 month plus 
one- third unities Call 
(785)342-1554 

FEMALE ROOMMATE No 
•making Two-bedroom 
apartment Close lo ram- 
pus Oil-street I 
Washer' dryer Available im- 
medialety 1620)481-9637 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

three bedroom house lor 
spnng semester Renl $320 
plus utilities Very nice 
bouse 1316)990-2046 

FEMAU Ki VMM.vr s 
rif-^rtPd Fun. out-going, no 
pets Two-bedrooms avails 
ble $300' each (913)486- 
2745 

NICE BRICK hornf Wash 

, ■' walk I 
i initials 

bills Available January 
1 785)443-2229 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
$350 one-halt utilities Scott 

SUBLEASER FOR one ol 
tout -bedrooms. University 
Crossing Begins January 
S275 monthly Cabi. 
washer' dryer tin 
(316)6506563 



WALK lo class No smoWftfl. I . M ■ 
no dnnking. no peta nflsp Wanted 
(765)539 1554 




220 



Weight Loss & / 

Nutrition 



I LOST 55 pounds in eight 
weeks' See pictures and 
read my story 
DOM iwitwtijia ihj.il | go 




For Rent- 
Houses 



AVAILABLE NOW three- 
bedroom, 908 Vattret $750 
Oft-Mreel parking i. 785)3 1 3 
2579 



ONE BEDROOM WALK to 
class No smoking, no drink - 
WO,, no pats (785)539- 
1554 



THREE-BEDROOM, ONE 
path, house across Irom 
campus Modern applian- 
ces, central air, very clean 
Available immediately $350 
per bedroom phis utilities 
1735 Anderson Call KSU 
Foundation at (785)532- 
7569 0' (785)532-7541 



Sublease 

$365/ MONTH. University 
Crossing Cable, washer' 
dryer furnished One bad- 
room open m two-bedroom 
apartment Please call 

till VATTIER Two -bed- 
room $560 a month Close 
to campus (913)645 fi32l 

AGGlEVILLE LOFT Lease 
Irom January August 2006 
I loom (wo bath- 
loom new carpet $350; 
iTiomh Moore Property 
M 5)53 7- 



FEMALE 

wanted tor spnng semester 
One halt block Irom cam- 
pus $?75 All utilities paid 



FEMALE SUBP 

wanted Three blocks Irom 
lour bom Aggle- 
ville W. ' $275 

,'kis one-half 
Call (765)282-5364 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted Walking distance to 
campus Large room $300 
plus one third utilities Avail- 
able January 1 Please call 
(785)640-3286 

MALE SUBLEASE wanled 
One-bedroom out of three- 
bedroom house Rent $300/ 
month phis utilities Availa 
bla second semester 
(913)636-6686 

NEED MALE or female suh 
leaser December $275/ 
month pkts utlklies Close to 
campus (316)644-2118 

ONE BEDROOM CHASE 
Manhattan Apartments 
available January Call 
|785)539-B366 Water/ trash 
paid Pels allowed 

ONE-BEDROOM $395. ca- 
ble/ water paid Laundry/ 
pool' hoi tub or> site SmaJ 
pets Quiet Available now 
(786)375-3018 



SUBLEASER NEEDED tor 
January I Spacious one- 
bedroom, close to campus/ 
Aggieville (785)564-7134 



The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty Ihe financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em 
ploy ment/Ca rear classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau. t>0( SE Jetlerson 
Topeka KS 66607 (190 
(785)232-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any held Ot 
work Or labor lor which 
he/ she la properly quali- 
fied regardless Of race, 
set. military status, disa- 
bility, religion, age. color, 
national origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to Ihe Director ot 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)5872441 

I8ARTENPING' $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1 -800-965-6520 est 
144 

ROYAL PURPLE YEAR 
BOOK statt is looking lor a 
marketing assistant to hefp 
design promotional material, 
assist with yearbook sales 
and participate in marketing 
activities Work on salary '■> 
help ptnmotp K- Stale's 
awa'rtwinning yearbook 
Ten hours' week Start m 
mediately Call Llnd> . 
tar al (785|532-8S57 tot 
more information 



Help Wanted 

CHRISTMAS BREAK spe- 
cial Not going home tor the 
holidays? Earn soma money 
& have ton Irom mid- De- 
cember to Jan 3rd at the C 
Lazy U Quusl Ranch n &m 
Rockies When work is tin- 
ished spend a week with 
tree room and tioa'd to pur 
su.j your lavofde winter act! 
vftes in Grand County Colo- 
rado Contact Phil Owyei al 
(970) 887 3344 or Email 
frtmiaTa l fsl l la fl tm 



ECONOMIC DEVELOP 
MENT Coordirtalor > ufl 
time position available in 
Wabaunsee County Satan/ 
based upon e« penance For 
complete position descrip- 
tion please contact WCED 
sppaca- 
Hon deadline postmarked by 
November 21 Please send 
cover letter and resume to 
WCED. PO Bo« S. Alma KS 
1*401 or emai' IP 
*teoX>!i ha/iiaajigL 

GET PAID to drive a brand 
new car! Now paying driv- 
ers $000 SJ2O0 a month 
Pick up your tree car key to- 

www.freocarHtry.com 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAV- 

GROUND Supervisors 

Hall Monitors nunded lor 

"I school year 

SO 50 per hour one and 

• 

i m I 00 p m Apply 

lo USD 363, 2031 

Ave Manhattan, KS 156502 

'2000 Equal Op- 

l-JfJlylii 

OUTBOUND SALFS Civ 

in producing custom de 
signed local government 
websites Currently we are 
luring part time and toll-time 
telemarketing staff lo assist 
in our sales efforts Musi be 
a motivated seN- starlet with 
strong communication skiffs 
Base * 

%\W hnut or 

it. Colli m Mi 

1 1 taxi Inrmat 

Equal Opportunity Employ- 



PROGRAMMER CIVIG- 
' . leading 
provider ot custom designed 
local government websites 
Microsoft ASP and SOL e«- 
pertenoa required $14 50' 
hour Email resume in Mfr 
>vord or ip.- 

RETAIL SALES Clerk pusi 
Iron available al McMiilins 
Apply m person at 
>"ve Suite A 
i able to work eve- 
nings and weekends. 

STUDENT NEEDING ride 
home occasionally lo Par- 
on weekends Will 
ipenses 1620)421 
UflS 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
bio a I Kansas State Univer 
slty is accepting appil 
tor a jiart-limo posflion tor 
: ins be 
*eek ol 
he lech 
loam maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work 
stations, provtdiny software 
support as well as perform- 
ing general hardware mam 
terrance Applicants should 

< penance with Mac 
OS X OS X Server and its 
server administration solt- 

"perienc* in any or 
ail ot Ihe following is a phis. 
Had mi rid. Shell scripting 
and qeneral troubleshooting 
ability along with knowledge 
ol MySQL, PHP and the 
Apache web server Pay 
starts at $7 SO per hour with 
the opportunity lo advance 
Only stud«nts enrolling in 
spring semester 2006 tor at 

least sin hours al Kansas 
Shut i Mnwsity can b> pan 
sidered Applications are 
available in 113 or ilSKnd 
lie or online at 
littojyaouu.haij.fldu.'uKhjaa 

deadline is 5 pm Friday. 
I 2005 Please in- 
dude you i spring 2006 class 
schedule Return 

■ 



<p If you are a graphic design major and would like an 
on-campm spring 2006 internship for credit, stop by for 
an application. Your art department adviser's permission 
is required. Application deadline if Friday, Nov. 18. 



Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m, 
for more information. 




Earn class credit working with the ad design/production staff on 
the fXansas State Collegian during spring semester 2006 Limited 
enrollment. The Instructor's permission is required. No prerequisites 
are necessary Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 am 3 pm for an 
application Application deadline is Friday, Nov 18. 



Business 

Opportunities 



The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty Ihe financial potential ot 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such bualneaa opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson, Topeka. 
KS 68607 1190 (785)232 
0454 




Items for Sale 



BX10 DOG KENNEL $45, 
26' ladies bfke, $15. Archi 
lad leather carryliM 
table miscellaneous sup- 
plies. $30 or besl offer Call 



WOMEN OF K-Slate Don't 
become a sexual assualt 
victim Keychain pepper 
■prayers on sale h.<i 
Cat (785)341-5294 or email 
nacman72»hotmall com 




510 



Automobiles 



1998 DODGE Neon, white 
two-door, five-speed, air 
conditioning, dependable 
transportation Great car tor 
tw* driver or work vehicle 
Very clean in greal shape, 
75k asking $3000 

(785)56? 9242 tor details 

530I 



Mntorev'-'P--. 



1994 NINJA 8 ' 

Per. 15.000 miles Vance 

and Nines pipe $2000, firm, 

(785)341-8872 




630 



Spring 
Bvwk 



•*#! SPRING Break Web 
site' Low prices guaranteed 
Book 11 people, get 12th 
trip treel Group discounts k> 
six plus 

wyrw.SpnngBfeak.0is 
counts.-"' 1 " 1 " wvrw.Lai- 
iureTourt.com 
fSrjO)B3S-B202 



SPRING BREAK Early 
Booking Specials FREE 
meals and drinks $50 De- 
posit- (800)234-7007 
.v,w; aj ji...-iiui!.in'.-i;ju"ii; 
am. 




sudoku 



Fill in the grid SO thai every row, 

every column, and every 3 x 3 box 

contains the digits I through 9 

with no repciiis 



6 1 9 


2 


5 






8 


7 1 


5 


6 


3 


4 


6 


4 7 


2 


9 7 
4 


3 




6 3 


9 


8 


3 








5 


8 




6 


1 






2 








7 


1 9 6 


Solution and tips 







/ U' 


WW. 


sudoku 


.com 



K rin n ill |)U//lt' 

and receive FREE chips 

.mi! small drink. 

i«iili puniian nl ,nn m/i kith) 




Deadline* 

Classified ads must be 
placed by noon the day 
befcKe you want your ad 
lo run. Classified display 
ads must be placed by 
4 p.rn two working days 
pnor to the date you want 
your ad to run. 
Call 532-6555 



ClassiiiedRATES 

1DAY 

20 words ot less 
18.30 

each word over 20 
20c pet word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or less 

each word over 20 
25c pei word 

3 DAYS 
20 words or less 

$1165 

each wcid over 20 
30c per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words 0' less 

$12 90 

each word over 20 

35c per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$1400 

each word over 20 

40c per word 

( consecutive day rate ) 



TO PUCE AN AD 

Go to Ked/ie 103 

(across Irom ihe 

K-Siale Sludenl Union). 

Offloa ■" -in i ,w 

Monday through Friday 

Irom 8 a m. to 5 p m 

The office is open 

except on holidays 



HOW TO PAY 

Ail classifieds must be 

paid in advance unless 

you have an account 

wilh Sludenl 

Publications Inc 

Cash, check, 

MasterCard oi Visa are 

accepted There is a 

$10 service charge on 

all returned checks. 

We reserve the right to 

edit, reject or property 

Classify any ad 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service to you we 

run found ads lot thiee 

days free ol charge 

CORRECTIONS 

It you lind an error in 
your ad, please cal us. 
We accept responsi- 
bility only lor the first 
wrong insertion 



CANCELLATIONS 

If you sell your item 

before your ad has 

expired, we will folund 

you tor the remaining 

days You must call us 

belor e noon Ihe day 

be tore the ad is to be 

published. 



HEADLINES 

in extra charge, 
we'll put a headline 
above your ad to catch 
the reader's attention. 








- ^ " 



.-_.-., 






I* 



Page 8 / 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Nov. 15,2005 






TESTM ASTERS | LSAT classes possibly fraudulent 



Continued from Page 1 

operates us "TeslMasUTs" in 49 

states, and as "Scm 
feet" in Texas as a result. 

The Houston firm has sched- 
uled a weekend class to he 
taught at K Stale on DecCfldM 
17 and 18. As of Monday eve- 
ning, its Web site listed the class 
to be from 9am to 6 p.m. each 
day and listed the following ad- 
drtM 9 Anderson Hall, Man- 
hattan, Kan. It also listed the 
phone number (785) 532-601 1 

The address is not a class- 
room, but the home of K-State 
Media Relations and Marketing. 
and the phone number is the 
general contact number for the 
University itselt Kim luckson, 
K-Stale room -scheduling spe- 
cialist, said to her knowledge no 
classes, K-State or Test Masters, 
are scheduled in Anderson. 

An employee of Test Masters 
said the company actually had 
not reserved any room for the 
class, and would wail until it 
had enough enrolled in il before 
arranging for a room "within 
three miles of campus" 

She said students would be 
d within a week and a 
half of the class's scheduled 
date if the class were to be can- 
celled 

( .nnille Kuslia. 22. a gradu- 



ate of Emory University in At- 
lanta Ga , said she had a simi- 
lar experience. She said she was 
a J vised hy friends already in 
law school to take classes from 
Test Masters " because they had 
taken instruction from the San- 
ta Monica firm but she went lo 
the Houston firm's Web site by 
mistake 

Kuslia said she enrolled and 
received an e mail from the 
Houston firm that told her the 
i hiss-.'s would be at the Grady 
Memorial Hospital in Atlanta 
She tsU « lit' 1 1 she got there and 
tried the phone number, she 
was connected lo an anesthesia 
secretary there, 

Rustia said she later discov- 
ered there were two "test mas- 
ters," and called the Houston 
firm for an explanation First, 
they told her the class was can- 
celled and all the students had 
been called but her. She had 
been missed, but she did get a 
refund. 

Rustia said she pushed for 
more information, and later was 
told the class was cancelled be- 
cause only one person enrolled, 
her. She was not pleased 

"Well, if I was the only one 
enrolled and you called every- 
one in the class, well, who did 
you call?" Rustia said. 

She said she then enrolled in 



the Santa Monica firm's t 
but had already missed the firet 
two. They did not give her a dis- 
count 

The New York State Con- 
sumer Protection Board also 
said Test Masters requires stu- 
dents taking its course to sign 
a refund-waiver agreement al 
least twice that said the students 
know there are other non-affili- 
ated companies that use names 
similar to them However, it re- 
ferred to the Santa Monica firm 
by its corporate name, Robin 
Singh Educational Services, 
and not its public name, Test- 
Masters 

An individual contacted 
l he Kansas Slate Collegian last 
week and said the Houston firm 
was making students sign con 
fidentiality agreements to get 
refunds, preventing other stu 
dents from learning about the 
deception 

The student, who asked to 
remain anonymous out of fear 
of legal action, also signed the 
agreement 

Israni said his company was 
being falsely depicted hy the 
New York Board and by its 
competitor. 

We have had over 63,000 
satisfied customers since 1991," 
he said, "Every class is subject 
to enrollment" 



INSTRUCTOR | Heredity factors into aneurysms 



Continued from Page I 

said an aneurysm is the dila- 
tion of an artery somewhere in 
the body The walls of the artery 
become thin and the sides press 
against organs or the artery rup- 
tures 

Kadhi said an aneurysm in 
the brain can cause headaches, 
seizures or death and can affect 
visual nerves and the motor cor- 
tex 

No specific age group is more 



prone to aneurysms, Radii i said. 
but heredity is a factor, A person 
has a 10 percent (o 20 percent 
chance of having an aneurysm if 
a relative had one 

Ines De La Torre Ugarte said 
she has not losl any abilities, but 
she does feel weak. 

"Everything's exactly the way 
it was in the past," she said "My 
brain needs rest" 

Fernando Ugarte said his wife 
has retained all her faculties and 
movement, but lost a consider- 



able amount of weight 

Ines De La Torre Ugarte suf- 
Icred the aneurysm on Oct. 12 in 
her office. She originally thought 
she would be back teaching 
classes in January, but her doc 
tors said she will probably need 
more time to recover. 

"It's just a miracle for me," 
Ines De La Torre Ugarte said. 
"I never thought something like 
this could happen to me. God 
gave me another opportunity lo 
be here." 

H- 



RECYCLING | Electronic products can be reused 



Continued from Page 1 

recommendations from the 
Kansas Department of Health." 

Nearly 100 percent of plastic 
and 80 percent of chemical -based 
products are recyclable, Peterson 
said. 

One of the toughest obstacles 
in advertising for a recycle pro- 
gram is overcoming misconcep- 
tions, Peterson said 

"Everything helps." he said 
"Most people think a little bil 
here or there won't help the city, 
but it does" 

In 1989, Peterson said Riley 
County experienced heavy prob- 



lems with chemical recycling, 
where people would inappropri- 
ately discard waste. 

When discarding these wastes. 
serious legal and environmental 
hazards may occur, Kate Krebs, 
National Recycling Coalition di- 
rector, said. 

"Numerous states have singled 
i ml electronic products as a direct 
threat to the environment when 



disposed, and as a result, have en- 
acted strict laws and regulations 
banning their disposal and land- 
filling," Krebs said 

Through America Recycles 
Day and other county-sponsored 
events, Peterson said the county 
aims to eventually expand the re- 
cycling programs so the commu- 
nity can enjoy the long-term ben 
■ tits of safely discarding waste. 



1$ 50foil 



s 40 Bravura y 

30p e ^ icure 



[with Shannon, Bri, I 
Ashler, ot Tar a 





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■rthajroit 



yflarmes 



FlSl 



LL2S Utkim » . 



i • 7S5.778.S100 



— — 





EVERYTHING 



4* 



Karaoke Night 




■Ttcllwtre/i sale now! 




DO YOUR HOLIDAY SHOPPING 

at ACME GIFT & 

RECEIVE 10% OFF 
ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING ! 

V SALE RUNS SATURDAY THE 19TH 
FROM 10AM TO 8PM, 

5£ FREE HOT CHOCOLATE A 
FRESHLY POPPED POPCORN 

5$ SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE 
ON YOUR LIST. WE PROMISE 



ACMEGIFT 



1227 moro street 
agglevllle 



Y (J U know 

how 



when you 

make re 

yourself? 



January 2006 



Time Is Running Out. EnroN today! To enroll and/or obtain an Inter session schedule with complete course descriptions and prerequisites , visit 
our web site at http-tfwww dc* ksu-«tu/ It you prefer, call (7851 532-5556 or t -600-432- 62 22 or visit Ihe Division ol Continuing Education at 131 
College Court Building 1615 Anderson Ave . Manhattan. KS 

Tuition tor cm-campus couraework will be $164 pes undergraduate resident credit hour und $227 pet graduate resident credit hour, plus St per day 
Special and health fees. A student services tee and/or materials lea may be required lor some courses. A $14 per credit hour fee is assessed tor 
Engineering and Architecture courses 



We 
thcTOp. 




Check out the 

MENU GUIDE 

in back of the 

Campus Phone Book 

Available in Kedzie 103 
Mon. - Fri, 8 am. - 5 p.m 





December 27, 2005 - January 1 1, 2006 



AGRICULTURE 

Practlcum in Bakery Technology 

ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, 8 DESIGN 
Design Graphics and Visual ThW 
Pro/Advanced Design Graphics/Visual Thinking 

ARTS i SCIENCES 

Forensic Medicine & the Investigation of Death 

Hip- Hop as Literature 

The History of Insurgency on American Soil 

The Hialory of American Movies snd the Movie Going Experience 

Sport and Esterase Personality 

Philanthropy and Corporate Commutm 

Jaz* In Kansas City and the Southwest 

Social Construction of Serial Murder 

Theatre tor Conflict Resolution 

BUSINESS 

Achieving Career Success. Developing Personal Competencies, 

Outwitting Opponents, & Avoiding Common Career Traps, 
Introduction to Total Quality Management 



EDUCATION 

Management 

Management lor Teachers, Counselors, and Administrators 
Early Field Expenenc* 

ENGINEERING 

CAD in Engineering and Constru. 

CAD in Engineering and Construction 

Energy and Environmental Impacts Related to Su* in inability 

Introd'. ' j r mat ion Technology 

Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet Applications 

Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applications 

Topics In Co Management; Building Commissioning 

Topics in Construction Management Tilt -Up Concrete 

Structures in Construction Management 
Introduction to Total Qua Illy Management 



Hazwoper Training 

HUMAN ECOLOGY 

Topics: Introduction to Infant Menial Health 

Raising Emotionally H idren 

P i obta m m t Sns Family LM 

to Marriage and Family Therapy 
Topksr. Premarital Education and Coun 

.ong-Torm Care Administration 
Lodging Management Theory 



Qmom* He" 



GRSC 701 $4101 



LAR 310 
LAR741 



AN rit 6S4 

i 
HIST 
KIN 592 
MC 450 
MUSIC 424 

K>( 10 562 



MHM 

94110 



94112 
94118 
94 1 1 g 
94117 
94121 
.94123 
94124 
04126 



Credit 
i UG/G 



3UG 
3 UG/G 



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3 UG/G 
3UG 

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THTHE 673 94129 3 UG>G 



GENOA 498 
MANGT 300 



94131 

Miaa 



EDCEP 502 94142 
EDCEP S02 94146 
EDSEC230 94M8 



ARE 3t 1 
ARE 311 

CHE 650 
CIS 101 

cts its 

CIS 
CNS644 

CNS644 
DEN 300 



DEN39B 



FSHS 704 
FSHS 708 
GERON 610 

HPIMP 664 



94151 
94152 
94153 

94156 
94156 
94158 

S415M 
B4 1 8*i 



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1/5-1/11 



12/27-1/11 
M/11 



1/3-1/10 
'10 
12/27-1' n 
12/27-1/11 
12/27 
12/27-1/11 
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12/30 1/11 



12/27-1/1 1 

t/e-1/a 



12/27-V1 I 
12/2M.11 
12/27-1/1 1 



12/27- 1; 11 
12/27 
1/4-1/6 
12/27 

i/4-t/e 

1/9- 1/1 1 
12/28-1/11 

12/27-1/11 
1/6-1/9 



i/3 Ma 



12/27-1/11 
12/27-1/11 
12/27 
12/27 

12/27 



Ttmeo 



MTWUF 8 00 AM-4 30 PM 



MTWUF 1 30 PM-430 PM 
MTWUF 1 30 PM-4 30 PM 



MTWUFSa 9:00 AM-6;00 PM 
MTWUF 12:30 PM-500 PM 
M7WU 6 00 PM 10 00 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM-5 00 PM 
MTWUF 9 00 AM 12 45 PM 
MTWUF 9:00 AM-1 2:30 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM-430 PM 
MTWUF 100PM-5 30PM 
Sa 9 00 AM-5:00 PM 
MTWUFSa 900 AM-5:00 PM 



MTWUF 8 30 AM 12:00 PM 
F 500PM-1000PM 
Sa 8 30 AM-1 00 PM 
M5.-OOPM-1000PM 



MTWUF 3:30 PM-6:30 PM 
MTWUF 3 30PM-6.30PM 
APPT 



MTWUFB00AM-I2OQPM 
MTWUF 12:30 PM-4 30 PM 
WUF 8 OO AM-5 00 PM 
TWU 8 00 AM- 12: 10 PM 
WU* 6 00 AM-t2; 10 PM 
MTWBGO AM 12:10 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM-4:00 PM 

MTWUF 9:00 AM-1 130 AM 

F 5:00 PM- 10:00 PM 
Sa8:30 AM 1:00 PM 
M 6 00 PM- 10:00 PM 
TWUT 8 00 AM- 7 00 PM 



MTWU 8 30 AM-1 00 PM 
MTWUF 1:00 PM-4 45 PM 
TWUF 8 30 AM-12 15 PM 
MTWUF 5.30 PM-9:00 PM 
MTWUF 5 00 PM-8 30 PM 
MTWUF 9:30 AM- 1 00 PM 



VfcRIFY ALL COURSE INFORMATION BY CHECKING THE WEBSITE PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS. 



Division of Continuing Education 

ymw.dceMu.edu/tntmr3ession 






■ 









» * -■ *< »,- . . 



h 



lusitle: In-depth coverage, Pages 6 



THE EFFECT ON KSTATE 




/^K A N S A S STATE 

• Collegian 



Sub Exp Date 

IS Slate Historical S 

Nswsj Won 

PO Box 3585 




WMrnkMatecoUcguiLcain 



Wednesday, November 16,200! 






'This is the right time' 

BILL SNYDER COACH I ^89-200 




Chmtopher H»n*wlntk«l | lOIHCIAN 

During a press conference announcing his retirement, coach Bill Snyder pauses after becoming overwhelmed with emotion. Snyder wilt coach his final game at K-State Saturday against Missouri, 

Coach to leave program he placed among nations elite 



By Michael Ashford 

KANSAS MATE C0I1 MAN 

The sun has begun to set on the Bill Snyder era at K-Slale 
After leading the K-Stale football team from the darkness of the 

college football world, Snyder and university officials announced 
lay that Snyder will retire as head football coach at K State 

after the Wildcats' final game of the season Saturday against Mis 

Snyder, who inherited college football's Inatoejmt program when 

is hired i m Nov 10, 1988, will leave the program as the school's 

winningest coach with at least 135 victories in 17 years. By com- 

m, rrutu 1917 88, a span of 52 years, K-State accumulated 134 

. decisii >ti to retire was based on Snyder's family and what was 

for the lootbail program and university, Snyder said. 

"The question is why, and the answer, to me, is really simple,' 

Snyder said "Kansas State University has been very good to Bill 

Snyder and the family of Bill Snyder and to our football program, 

and 1 appreciate this university a great deal I think there's a foun- 

n in entice the right individual to lead this program, and that 
makes it, in my way of thinking, the right thing for Kansas State 
University, and that's what's important to me. This is my home It 
u 111 continue to be my home and the home of my family 

'.■:■ have been blessed by the people who have surrounded our 
program, and I appreciate them so very much." 



However, Snyder will not completely leave K State, as he will as 
sume the position of special assistant to the athletics rJimctOI 
he retires as head coach 

Snyder said he will do all he Ctn in help the loolball program and 
the school alter he hangs up the clipboard, but that he doesn't want 



i 

■ 
■ 



/s'r 



to interfere with the next coach's job 

The process "t Snyder's reureri ii on Sunday when he 

calierj K-State Prendenl (on VVeiald and Athletics Director Inn 

r and asked to meet the Monday 

SiiyoYi informed Wi laid and Wetsei ol ins decision la retire, and 

football i Snyder told his players of the 

decisii 

As Snyder huddled his team In the look*! r n. the playeis were 

led m abode when Snyder made the announcement kutioi Una 

backer Maurice Mack said 

"Thai M i big 

shock to nit'' Mack laid "(The very emotional for 

everybody It took everybody back, and it makes you realize it. 
more In lite than fust football 

Many members of Snyder's family were ni Snyder's pttea confer- 
On nunti ked up while speak me 
of Ims family J|U ' the support «hnwn during his tenure at 
KSt 

"This has bi rmin| for me, imd very consuming lot 

my family," Snydet said i collect I he did several 

during the conference I've jol Bre children, wonderful < inl 
dren I've got eight grandchildren who are going to be very special 
in my life Indeed I an mnot been the kind of la 

titer that I should have been nor the kind of husband I don't know 

W SNYDER P»9* 10 



Today 



High 42 
Low 20 



Thursday 



* 



High 55 
Low 29 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Sports online 

The K-Stjtf volleyball team will at- 
tempt to break out ol Its recent dump 
when the Wildcats play Colorado at 
7 tonight at Abeam Field House The 
Wildcats (17-9, 8-8 Big 12) have lost 
two of their last three games and have 
fallen out of the top 2S . 1o read more, 
go to www. ktotnotleyian xom. 



<* 



BTK denied burial 

Convicted murderers like Dennis 
Radet will not be buried In a military 
cemetery upon death because of an 
amendment to the Defense Authonw 
tion Bill passed by the Senate Tuesday 
The amendment denies honors to 
veterans convicted of a capital ctlm*. 

P*9#l 



Collegian editors named 

The Board of Student Publications 
named Leann Sulzen as the Editor In 
Chief for the spring 2006 Coltgian 
Tuesday Brandon Smith was named 
the Advertising Manager Applications 
for the remaining spring 2006 staff 
positions ate due at S p.m today in 
KedJle 101. 



DON'T FORGET 



The Lurtchtime Lounge 

will have a table tennis 
demonstration hum noon 
tn i p m today in the Union 
Courtyard 

The Whetats will meet 
at 7 tonight at Gambtacrt 
Pizza, 1219 Bfuemom Ave 



The KSU Clarinet Choir 
and KSU Euphonium 
Ensemble will perform at 
/JOIomghl in the All Faiths 
Chapel as a part of the 
Student ftecilal Series 



R 



/ 



i 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2005 




1122 Laramie 



Bring this ad in for a 
sample 
when tanning! 

539-3742 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

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5 toy 

employ- 

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12 Con 

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13 Api 

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dei- 1 
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23 Hi 

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31 Tend lexis 
33 Treasure 
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35 My 
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38 Lair 

40 Mardi 

41 Roe 
provider 

43 Zero 
45 Garb 
47 Remarks 

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51 Ironside 
porlrayer 

52 Conven 
lencc 
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54 Yeah, 
IghU" 

55 Mythical 
monster 

56 Ms 
Til.- | 

57 Solidities 

58 B 

59 Crystal 
garer 



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supplier 

2 Tyler or 
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3 Pro- 

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4 Tried lor 
a homer 

5 Bri(?l 
witticism 
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beast 

tO Dealt with 

11 Guys' 
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20 Kippur 

23 Koppel or 
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24 K(l- i ■ 
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CAMPUS CHRONICLES 

Headlines from the nation's universities 



Toledo students take part in Potter craze 



II In 



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B I \ \ I II A K II P II I II W H C L 

P II / U S O L IIS K II W II (' 

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t, II v I II i I, BifJL C I l> . 
Ytaterdav'a ( . Npioqmp: wins i saw nil 
BAKKACKS PILLED WITH STACKPP BIDS I 
SHOUTED THAT'S A L.nl <j|-- BL'NK'" 

ImiI.iv ^ ( i\|iiiH.|utp Clue: U ci|UuK Ii 



TOLEDO, Ohio - Ala kazoom and aJa kazaam 
- Harry Potter and his magical ways are at it again 

Author and Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling 
will again bring the young wizard to life Nov. 18th, 
when ha coming-of-agc character will leave audi- 
ences spellbound (or the fourth time as the film ver- 
sion of "Harry Potter and the Gohlcl of F ; ire" arrives 
mi the red carpet 

Ask almost anyone, and he or she can tell you 
that Hurry Potter may look like a children's book 
character, hut the appeal spreads as far as college 
campuses 

The children I saw when the third bouk was 
released, I saw again with the latest book release 
r H.i in, Potter and the Half- Blood Prince"), Sn they 
are growing up with these books as Harry grows 
up,' said Jennifer Habrych, community relations 
manager at Barnes & Noble. 

TIhtc is a hit of nostalgia for young adull read 
lis because (Rowling) captures what it is like to bt* 
n," Habrych said. 

When 'Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince" 
was released in the summer, Barnes ik Noble had 
.i huge midnight release party that saw almost 900 
1 l.irry Potter fans of all ages walk through the doors, 
Habrych said 

ford an Blaney, a junior majoring in pharmacy, 
WSJ ,ii ,i Chicago Barnes and Noble when the book 
p» released 

"That was the only store that had people in it 
that night The mall parking lot was full of cars that 
i inly came for the Harry Potter book," Blaney said 

The true Harry Potter aficionado knows the boy- 
wizard's story goes beyond the four books 

The characters have made their way to the big 
screen, captivated viewers and net $830 million in 
total sales for the three movies released thus far, 
said Brian Callaghan. director of communication 
for National Am use men Is Theaters 

In regards to the movies, Callaghan said he has 
found ;i difference between the college "Harry Pot- 
ter" (an and the high school "Harry Potter" fan. 

"Students in college generally fee] more com- 
fortable with themselves and arc not afraid to go 
out with friends and see a Harry Potter movie," 
Callagban said "However, high school students 
ii.ii still hide behind the fact that they like "Harry 
Potter* and don't want anyone else to know" Col- 
led students and young adults also anticipate 
the first screening of "Goblet of Fire" because spe- 
cial showings will begin at the stroke of midnight, 
a prime time for most college students, Callaghan 
added. 

The University of Toledo's Order of the 
Phoenix club is a prime example of stu 
dents getting hyped up [or the film 

This group of students has regu- 
lar meetings to discuss everything 
and anything "Harry Potter "■re- 
Daniel Compora, a professor of 
English and the UT Order of the 
Phoenix adviser, said college students 
can relate to the "Harry Potter" char- 

iTS. 

Harry Potter has becoirte a 
hit with college students because 
throughout Harry's life, he has 
dealt with making friends, being in 
new places, being rejected and the 
universal themes of death and loss," 
Compora said "All things college stu- 

IllostraUotii by Bcnnle Green | CGI K6IAN 




dents deal with." 

Tony Kreamer, a junior ma- 
joring in biology, is a member 
of the UT Order of the Phoe- 
nix, and took second place 
out of about 20 people in a 
trivia contest during I meet- 
ing in March, where the group 
discussed the upcoming book 
and ideas for future meet 
ings 

Kreamer has his own 
ideas as to why Harry 
Potter has become one 
of the newest literary 
hemes and trends 

"I love Harry Potter' bemuse it is instantly read- 
able." Kreamer said. "I think that's the main reason 
everyone else is into it The trend comes into play 
with reading becoming fun again (or young adults" 

Kreamer is realistic about the irend and knOWS 
that Harry Potter will have his time now. only I- 1 mv 
it escape 

"Once the new books stop coming out. I think 
the cultural phenomenon will filler out and Hie 
books will be relegated to good boofe status," he 
said. 

"Harry Potter is at his peak right now," GORipon 
said. "In the future it will be out oi -aehi and out ol 
mind with him, but for now, the popularity waxes 
and wanes when a new Harry Poller book or movie 
is released" 

MAN CITED FOR KEG JOYRIDE IN STOLEN 
GOLF CART AT OREGON STATE 

CORVALLIS, Ore. - A stolen golf cart bttODfl- 
ing to the Oregon State University pull team - with 
three men and an untapped keg on board - dashed 
into a university public safety vehicle on Saturday at 
ahout 7:30 p m., according to police records 

The driver of the stolen cart, 28 year-old Ted Cer 
sovski, refused lo take a breath test but was cited for 
unauthorized use of a motor \ ehicle, driving under 
the influence of intoxicants and reckless endanger 
ing, police logs show He reportedly lold police he 
had paid somebody on campus $20 lor the cart 

Two other men nding with CtMOnH told police 
Cersovski offered them a ride in the cart One of 
the passengers was cited for minor in possession ol 
alcohol 

The keg did not have required paperwork and 
will he irivcstigaled by the Oregon Liquor Control 
Commission 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports ate taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs The Collegian don not list 
wheel locks ot minor traffic violations because of 
space constraints. 

Monday, Nov, 14 

■ Christopher Fateley, 3000 Turtle Creek Blvd.. Lot 

21 7, was arrested at 10:16 am. for battery. Bond was 
not set. 

■ John Cox, 920 Kearney St., was arrested at 1:J0p.m. 
for failure to appear Bond was set at $200. 

■ Mekel rVkAlpme, Ogden, Kan , was attested at 3 
p.m. fot failure to appear Bond was set at $ 1 ,000 

■ l«hn Martin, 813 Sunrise Circle, was arrested at 
6:24 p.m for furnishing alcohol to a mmot and con- 
tributing to c h ild mi sco n du c t Bond was set at $2 $0 . 

■ Arnold (yson, 711 Allison Ave., Apt. 3, was arrested 
at 1 1:40 p.m. fot Dill Bond was s*l at $750 

Tuesday, Nov. 15 

■ Joshua Resto, 20? N. 14th St., Apt }, was arrested 
at 4:30 a.m. (or battery. Bond was set at $S00 

■ Amanda Resto, 207 N. I4lh St., Apt 3, was arrested 
at 4:42 a.m. for battery Bond was set at $500 



ONI how massage 



» 



pdy VOVYfTRST 

(Till ID41M 






Jiet us put the final 
touches on your 
final projects 

"ClafUn j}ooki and £o/,iti 



Dr. Ryan I. Kueher 



Optometmi 



4i". OFF 



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^^^^^ litt linn, Sac Mwiii ot 
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••'»» aiMwiatflaaa 

Prognmus inwkM 

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VUttfcCaeaani 

HOL^READY 





The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin 
board service. Items in the calendar tan be published 
up to three times Items might not appear because 
of space constraints but are guaranteed to appear on 
the day of the activity. To place an item in the Campus 
Calendar, stop by Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a form or 
t mail the news editor at wtle<)ian!i><ipub}iu. erfu by 
1 1 a m two days before it is to run 

■ A library basics tor science and technology 
class will be from 3:4$ to 4:4$ p m today at Hale 
Library's reception desk 

■ A RefWorks dais will be from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. 
in Hale 408. 

■ The WiseCats f non traditional student dub) 
will meet at 7 tonight at Gainbinos Pizza, 1219 
Bluemont Ave 

■ The Graduate School announces the final 
ora) defense uf the doctoral disseitation of Kathryn 
Beougher at 9 this morning in Bluemont 368 

■ The Clarinet Choir and the Tuba and Eupho 
ntum Ensemble will perform at 7 30 tonight in All 
Faiths Chapel 

■ An ice cream social for women interested in 
Smutthwaite Scholarship House will bt at 7 tonight at 
IheSmurlhwaKe, 1S00W Manhattan Ave 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas State Unrvetsity. is published 
by Student Publications Int , Ked;ie 103. Manhat- 
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State Collegian, circulation desk. Ked2ie 103, Manhat 
tan, KS66S06 7167 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



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Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Convicted killers will not 
be given military honors 



By Kristen Roderick 
KANSAS STATE COLI Et.lAN 

Convicted murderers like 
Dennis Kadcr wont be buried in 
a military cemetery upon death 
because of an amendment to 
the Defense Authorization Bill 
passed by the Senate Tuesday 

I hiui it unconscionable 
that the serial murderer, Den 
in*. Kader, whose heinous crimes 
terrorized Kansans over three 
decades, would be granted a 
hem's funeral," Sen Pat Rob- 
ert*, R-Kan , said in a release 
"I am pleased that the Senate 
has quickly responded with this 
Important amendment which I 
strongly support ." 



The amendment denies mili- 
tary funeral honors to veterans 
convicted of a capital crime 

A previous loophole in the 
bill allowed capitol offenders 
with honorable discharge, who 
are eligible for parole, to he hur 
ied in veterans cemeteries 

Last year, 1,200 veterans 
were buried with military hon- 
ors by Fort Riley soldiers, laid 
Deb Skidmore, deputy public af- 
fairs officer at Fort Riley 

Skidmore said ceremonies 
for those honor burials include 
folding and presenting the US 
flag and the playing of taps 

Rader, an Air Force veteran, 
H as awarded the Air Force Good 
Conduct Medal, the Small Arms 



Expert Marksmanship Ribbon 
and the National Defense Ser- 
vice Medal. 

Radcr pleaded guilty in Au- 
gusi to 10 killings in the Wich- 
ita area from 1974 to l*W|. He 
is currently serving a 175-year 
sentence at a maximum security 
prison. 

Allen Hailing, junior in elec- 
trical engineering, said he agrees 
with the amendment, but he can 
see the other side of it, as well 

rued their spot in a 
veterans national cemelery by 
serving their time in a branch 
of the armed forces," lie said 
"On the other hand committing 
capital crimes sort of voids that 
service " 



City approves TIF redistricting 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS STAK COllt&IAN 

Nearly one month ago, local 
business owners and residents 
pleaded for the Manhattan City 
Commission to reconsider a 
vi lie on a tav increment finance 
district 

However, Tuesday night the 
commission unanimously voted 
against this group's plea and ap- 
proved setting up a TIF district 
to benefit th< proposed 

downtown redevelopment proj- 

OU ROW set up 

a TIL district where taxes are 
gathered from parhculat husi 
ricss disttii. Is in Manhattan 

Then, TIP vul! allocate I per 
cartage oi those faxes inward 
projects like the $140 million 
downtown redevelopment 

Tlie Intentions oi the vote 
were not to inconvenience the 



city, but rather provide benefits 
for the area, Chamber of Com- 
merce Chairman Larry Heyka 

said 

He said this is especially true 
for the upcoming population 
growth in the area, which Ll 
Gov |ohn Moore estimates to 
increase by 22,000 

"It will also help make Man- 
hattan a destination shopping 
area, compared to cities like 
Wichita, f'npeka and Kansas 
City," Heyka said. 

Assistant City Manage] | 
llilgers said that TIF will pro- 
vide the process necessary to 
give private and public partner 
ship in the downtown redevel- 
opment project 

The last time Manhattan ap 
proved a TIL district was to 
contribute toward establishing 
Manhattan Town Center 

[hough nobody publicly ar 
gued against the approval of 



this ordinance on Tuesday, lot al 
businesses ham expressed hesi- 
tation 

"We believe the boundar- 
ies should be larger to increase 
the leverage of the area infra 
structure.' said Lisa Roekley. ex- 
ecutive director for Downtown 
Manhattan, Inc., one month 
ago, "ll lacks vehicular access to 
Ihe community of the west" 

Long-term residents in part! 
of the TIL' district have also ar- 
gued that the district doesn't 
give fair compensation for the 
toll it places on tome residents 

yet, Dial Realt) spoto 
Hob VVelstead said while con- 
cerns an valid contractors will 
work to i i did outcome 

I of ( 

With the pn - been 

long and timelj hut steel sharp- 
ens steel Each time we've ea 

hied ai I 'lies for a 

• project 



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Students prepare for Air Force life 



By Kaley Lyon 
MNSASSttTt CQU1 

On the surface. Man Beth 

Conk is a typical graduate stu 

dent She carries a lull class 
load, has a joh and she and her 

husband are anxiously antii i 

their lives aflci h Stale 
Mary Belli Cook Is ibo 
an extended cadet tor the Ail 
Force HOTC at K- Stale and will 
i imissioned as an officer 
of the United stales \n Force 
in 1 1 let k| i eremonj 

Cook was aba a ilistm 
guished graduate in field train 
ing, which means she was m 
the top in percent 

Though females make up 
unl\' about one quarter ol %h 
Force R( >IV cadets v uok said 
she lias never heen Ire. tied .niv 
differently because ol gender 

.in the rerj beginning 
when we came to talk to the 
Cadre, I w 

much as my husband was I've 
never seen any females Healed 

differently" Mar) K'-ih 
said. "Standard 

can meet them, you're rfl We 
actually have a lot of female 
i ship in the Corps 
Chris Mantle sophomore ill 
mica! engineering 

Cook and the other w 

good for the ROli 
"I think they're . 

Mantle uryone 

who wants (0 S 

try should he able 10 I 111 

In-Ill in the same 

one else" 

though physii 
fer slightly between mak 

females, this does not 111 

ily put female cadets al 
advantage In Eat i 
that these physical ; . 
serve as additional m it 
to her when it comes to physi 
cat (raining | FT) 

"Being a competitive p 

iii nature, I dim t want to drop 




Steven DoH|( t 
Air Force ROTC members run around the indoor trark in Ahearn Field 
House during physical training Tuesday morning. 



out o( ,i workout if evi 

keeps going" si I verj 

hojy's going ll 

. Id you 
up I think haim 

work 

■ 
mandator) PI sessions 

nut Weill i, i « a in 

though involven 

lUilt 

without evei " 

wtih the milt tor j 1 1< 
Beth Hi' 

ke Ihe 

I 
It'- 

.■ellii i 

most people don I dt 

took said there hasn i been 

,i daw 

\\ ithiri 59 days oftci 
iTtissiot sii i irei 

Marj Betn t ook will 
Iter fn lie has 



been ati gonzed us in ll 

nut will 

he.,. itctltgeno 

■ oies 
■ 
an < . n iii. \n Force, 

. in | 
then in to 

I'li.i 

I li.ii 
. will rei . 

■ 

nily I \ e li.ii 

i »ii 
expi 

ah. » 

tin 

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To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion Is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Gtrard 
Matt G or n ey 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoza 
Alex Peak 
Catrina Rawson 
Krlsten Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Snyder deserves 
gratitude from 
all K-State fans 

Bill Snyder announced his retirement 
as football coach al K State effective after 
Saturday's football game against Missouri. 

For those living in a hole the past 17 
years, Snyder orchestrated what has been 
called the most impres- 
sive turnaround in 
the history of college 
football. After taking 
the reins of a program 
that had been wittiest 
in 27 games, he leaves 
the program among the 
nation's elites 

But Snyder's success 
on the field transcends 
just football. 

When he arrived at 
the university, enroll- 
ment was dwindling 
and prospects in Man- 
hattan were bleak. Less 
than two decades later, K- State boasts 
24,000 students, largely as a result of 
Snyder's efforts. 

Hale Library receives funding from 
the football team's annual spring football 
game and has authored books on leader- 
ship that are used in classrooms across 
the nation. 

Snyder is also responsible for bringing 
the Powercat logo to K State, which has 
become the nationally- recognized symbol 
of the entire university and transformed 
its entire image. 

At the very least, Snyder has placed 
K Slate on the map among college foot- 
ball's finest programs. It is now a program 
to be reckoned with raUier than the foot- 
ball farce it was in 1989 season. 

It is time for people to pause for a mo- 
men i and shower Snyder with the admira- 
tion and respect of a grateful fan base. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor They can be 
submitted by e-mail to kfttnpiptib.ku.tdu, or in person to 
Kedac 1 16, Please include your full name, year in school and 
major letters should be limited lo 2S0 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 



/^Mt A N S A S i T A 1 t 

Collegian 



Mmtww CVirard 
(OTMINCHIfl 


Johunn* R«n*t 

MMCMcrwroi 


Krtiun Roderick 

Nf Wi tWTf* 


MitiConny 
(OfUHItl 


CMrilMRmnon 

MMMH 


MlthMl Aihford 

womMtiiTOR 


Aniwtt* Lawl*ii 

CIlTOVlWII* 


ktiby StowntMck 

campus hntm 


THt IDU (BUM 


JonoiMofg 

1WWDH i IH10B 


Anthony Mwufoia 
fl«i W KTATION EIXTOIt 


CurtHMnnwxt 

ONIINf IfJIIOt 


D*V* SfcrttU 

WHII'Nl, COACH 


Bred Sim mom 

*l)MARM,f» 


AndytV.H.- 

H) All M*H*W( 


\ 






A 


CONTACT US 





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KediJelOJ Newsroom ,SJ2-«56 

Manhattan, KS 66502 news&put>,lau,t4u 

ftjobyah 532-6560 Dettvery problems. S12-6SS5 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 16,2005 



Turkey tolerance 

'Sensitivity training day' should replace out-dated Thanksgiving holiday 




lllurtretloru by Elvlt Athelpohl | (.01 KUAN 



Thanksgiving? Does this coun 
try seriously continue to celebrate 
a holiday instituted by Puritan Pil- 
grim Christians 



KODY 
COOPER 



^eSJJSjjw whose "thanks 

ifl k)m giving" was to 
K^ STW God for His 

bountiful bless- 
fc-* w ing upon their 

autumn harvest? 
_ I 9 Yes, it's true, 
-^ _ | modern America 
* ^ J actually acquiesc- 
es to this Chris- 
tian relic purport- 
ed by Presidents 
Washington, 
Lincoln and Roosevelt (number 
two). This is unacceptable. As a 
potbellied Pantheist American, I 
am doubly outraged 

How dare such an insensitive 
holiday be allowed? Thanksgiving 
to one creator? Monotheism? Says 
who? Billions of believers world- 
wide? The three worst American 
Presidents? 

According to the pagan Panthe- 
ist punditry-God is all. God is a 
tree, God is a wrench, God is a 
dodgeball, God is cranberry sauce. 
Indeed, God is a turkey 

How am I supposed to enjoy my 



Pantheist Thanksgiving? I'm trying 
to give thanks to my turkey-God, 
and the oppressive majority wants 
to eat it. How can I thank my God 
and eat Him at the same tii 1 1 

True, I guess monotheistic tran- 
substantiationalist Catholics thank 
and eat Jesus with regularity But, 
really, what does "transubstan na- 
tion" mean anyway? According to 
my theological thesaurus - also 
known as my brain - its synonym 
is "flatulence". 

Now I'm confused I thought 
flatulence meant "secular liberal 
ism" Forgive me, my thoughtsau 
rus has several entries 

Thanksgiving is not only an af 
front to my false religion, but also 
to my fat ass 

Six- hundred fifty million 
pounds of cranberries, 1 billion 
pounds of sweet potatoes, 7 billion 
pounds of turkey - what a way for 
America to prey upon and cash in 
on overeating fatsos like me. 

I can't help my obeastliness 
What if 1 love gorging myself 
and hate sit-ups* 7 It isn't right In 
America to institutionalize my 
cholesteric demise 

My disgusting fat body is my 
fault? Not according to peer 



reviewed scientific journals id 

emists recently uncovered the c.c 
nealogical cause for "love of fatly 
foodi end bat* oi en the 

Michael Moore gene, discovered in 
2004 

Al least one champion is fight- 
ing for fatties Pormef President 
Bill Clinton is currently crusad- 
ing against youth obesity across 
America. He recently gave a pre- 
Thanksgiving speech to a group of 
overweight children, admonishing 

"Don't have sexual relations 
with your turkey breasts" 

I tlcnt advice, Mr President. 
I'm glad someone is looking out 
for the fat kids Ihis Thanksgiving. 
But, what about the oppressed 
false-rcligiously faithful ' 

Christian-rooted "Thanksgiving 
- 1 lively belittles my fallacious 
Pantheistic creed 

Some tolerant and multicultural 
country this is Obviously the arms 
ol Lady Liberty don't welcome 
downtrodden paunchy Pan lie 

It's time to replace Thunksgiv 
ing Day with 'Sensitivity Training 
It will be a day when Ameri- 
cans learn bow (o be tolerant of all 
>us creeds Macy's Sensitivity 
Training Day parade will be quite 



an es 

Watching the parade, Americans 
will be re-educated to equate all 
creeds on the same moral plane via 
"diversity floats" Pantheist culture 
will be on display in promotion of 
tolerance. 

In an age of radical Pan the 
■SlofasctStS engaging in terrorism, 
Sensitivity Training Day will be a 
terrific opportunity to reach out to 
try and understand this misunder- 
stood culture 1 can sec the new 
NBC lelecaM now 

"Wow, Katie Here comes our 
first diversity float tilled "Pantheis- 
tic women". 

"I see it Matt Just look at those 
beautiful burkas and cunning hi- 
jabs These four ladies would make 
fine wives for any polygamous 
Pantheistic man." 

"Stunning, Katie. You can 
barely see their faces What rich 
culti: ■ 

h l love Sensitivity Training Day, 
Matt. It's a time for turkey and 
tolcrai 



Kody Cooper h t lenior in political science 
ind Spanish. Pitas* tend four comments to 
opinion* tpub.kiu.tilu. 



Need goes beyond holiday season 



The grocery store where I work 
is raising money for the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket. We are supposed to 

ask each customer 

^fJl hk if he or she would 

^^^^^ like to donate 

jfl| B dollar to con 

M"' ^^fc tribute toward a 

j^L iA {UT ^ e y dinner tor 

the less fortunate. 

I recently asked 

^B a middle aged 

Baadfli woman if she 

KELSIY would like to 

CHILDRESS d L ona , te a <? ollar t0 
the Breadbasket 

for Thanksgiving 

She said no, quite rudely. Then I 

noticed her T-shirt, It said. "Food 

Walk: End Hunger!" 

How ironic This got me think- 
ing, how often do we contradict 
ourselves in this way? 

What about that sedan, with 
scripture and a cross plastered on 
the back window' Yet, they cut you 
off and refuse to let you into the 
lane after a football game? It would 
cost them about thirty seconds to 



let another car in, but they refuse 
to. Obviously, you can't let in every 
person in line, but one or two surely 
won't hurt anything 

Little things compliments, 
donations, extra clothes - someimir g 
make a person's day, even if they are 
merely an afterthought of the giver. 

It's not hard to do little favors 
for others If everybody was like 
the "Scrooges" of the world, and 
nobody helped anyone, a lot more 
people would be suffering than 
those who arc already 

It is great to have people who 
want to help the "Food Walk" 



organizers, the assisted living" 
program vol un leers these people 
really do make a difference, simply 
because i hey care and they passion 
alely push i rtheai to care 

Christmas is my favorite holiday, 
not because of the presents, but be 
cause of the "holiday spirit," which 
pushes people to give something 
during the holidays It would be a 
wonderful thing to have the holiday 
,|irit year round, 

This goes hand in band with the 
Qoldetl Rule: Tread ntlu-rsthewny 
you want to be treated. Imagine 
how grateful people are when they 




can eat a warm Thanksgiving meat; 
from die Breadbasket, or the tears in 
the eyes of the single mothers who- 

now able to put presents under 
the tree for their children because CD* 
donations to Toys For Tots 

Extra help is especially needed — 
around the holidays. However, theS 
is a catch 22 People feel it is their I 
duty around the holidays to help 
those in need, but what about the - 
other 1 months of the year? People 
don't stop being poor after the nevf. 
year It is so easy to move on with ~ 
our lives, feeling like we have done— 
our "civic duty" because we helped" 
those in need during the holidays 

When the alcohol and sugar 
buzzes have worn off, it's important; 
to remember there are still others itv 
our community who need our help, 
just $1, one can of food or one hotjr 
of volunteering could change a life. 

II takes so little to help so much. 



KHwyCWIdrtaria 

twt and Span**. PImm seal year 

O pMMIti l p U b fau.edu. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus fourum is trie Collegia rft 
anonymous call-in system. The Fourum Is 
edited to eliminate wkjar, racist, obscene 
and libelous comments The comments are 
not the opinion of the Collegian nor Ait 
they endorsed by the editorial staff 



I? Seriously, what other 
reason was there to go to K State? I don't 
know about you, but I'm wearing black 
today 

Iferyar* better be at the game tbts 
weekend to say goodbye to the best thing 



to happen em happen to KSU football. 
Thanks coach Snyder 

Hew start are pad the stadium on 
Saturday afternoon to give Snyder the 
farewell that he deserves? Hats off to you, 
coach Snyder 

Thanks for ill the great memories, 
coach We will truly miss you 

What's with aH these idiots just posting 

in the fourum to complain > Oh . . damn It 



Nell to Tim Welter: if any member of 
thrs coaching staff gets the job, we will still 
suck Bill couldn't do ft all. 

If Tiger Woods' cousin was any good at 
golf, do you think he would be going to 
college? 

T* tat p eople who wanted Bill Snyder to 
step down, are you happy now? Hit wasn't 
for him, KSU would be so bad they would 
have to give tickets away 

Let's shsw coadi Snyder the respect he 



deserves by packing the student section 
with purple on Saturday and after (he 
game everyone needs to stoim the field 
and tear down the goal posts one last time 
in his honor. 

Attention: we are no longer in Kansas 
The campus mysteriously relocated to Sibe- 
ria overnight Return to Kansas Is expected 
mid-March 

To those who are criticizing of Bill Sny- 
der, I dare you to say that to his face 



It I ever hear anyone criticize Bill Snyder 
out loud, I will use their head to bowl with 
at league on Wednesday night 

I bet my tutor Is hotter than your tutor. 

tf you're saying goodbye to one of col 
lege football's all time greatest coaches, at 
least spell his name right 

Does Laferte give sentoritts vaccinations? 

I'll lake two 

Why be honest? Liars and backstabbers 



always win 

— 
Those goal posts are coming down 
Saturday to honor Snyder 

•Aernembertrut time that there was I 
music on MTV' That was awesome. 



We love you, wild Bill 



N»*d more Foumart 
Ityianiotn lot tM Ml nnkw. 



vveanesaay, Nov. lb, ^uuu 



KANSAS STATE COLLfcGIAN 



Page 5 



Leadership retreat 
open to all students 



By Adrianne DeWeese 

KANSAS SUIFlOl If MH 

■Application] ire due Friday 
for January's Leadership Chal 
Icnge 2006 

The fmir-day retreat, radii- 

d bj Leadership Studies and 

Programs, will help design and 

identify one's leadership polen 

ti.il at K Slate, said Candi Him 

naka. asso( late director oi Lead- 
ri ship studies and Prograira 

Hironaka said the re I real 
is open to all K-State itude 
with graduate and interii.ili"ti;il 

students encouraged to apply 

However, the retreat is limited 
to 50 sludenls 

"We select the most diverse 
students we can bring logeH 
she said, "We hate to leave any- 
one out, hul il" we have n 
than 50 apply, we have to make 
that decision" 

Applicants will be not died of 
their selection on Nov 28 by e- 
matl 

Himnaka said pari in pants 



will be divided into teams of 10. 
Each team will be led by a se- 
nior exponential leader, who is a 
K State instructor, and a junior 
exponential leader, who is a 
K-State upperclassman 

Through large group sessions 
and hands-on simulations, par 
licipants will look at issues of 
leadership irnm different per- 
spectives, Himnaka said. 

"Students will examine pus 
sibilities in coming back to 
K-State and initiating some type 
of positive change they would 
like to sec on campus for the 
spring semester," she said. 

This is the fourth retreat Lead- 
ership Studies and Programs has 
put on, Himnaka said. She said 
the retreat planning committee 
will vote on a theme for the re- 
treat today. 

The $50 application fee will 
COVef material costs for the re- 
treat, Himnaka said Campus 
organizations have sponsored 
students for the retreat in the 
past, she said 



Leadership Challenge 2006 

When: Ian 4-7, 2006 
Where: flock Springs 4-H Center, 
Junction City 
How much: $50 



Appkatiom arr due by S p.m. Friday to 

Leadership Studies and Programs, 918 N 

Manhattan Si 

Applications are available at www k nate. 

edu/kadenhip/(hallenge. 

The retreat is a way for stu- 
dents to meet others from 1 1 it- 
residence halls, the greek system 
and o(f eatnpus housing, Sarah 
Decke, leadership development 
coordinator, said. 

"Students get to come to- 
gether with other students they 
would have never met other- 
wise," Dcekc said. "They get to 
leam about who they are as a 
leader and what can tluv do M 
student leaders to help impact 
K-State" 



Americans giving more to charity 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS SI A! I COM MAN 

Plan to give a little more to 
charity this year 7 

According to a recent I )e 
loitte & Time be USA LLP RO 
vey, Americans plan to contrib- 
ute their hard earned cash (O 
charity, as opposed to qranduig 
it on gifLs and oilier holiday pur 
poses. 

The trend** an heavily related 
to receni International disasters 
including KUTficaiU Kalnna 
and the earthquake in 1 
said Laura Wilker, press contact 
of Deloitle & Tuck he LISA LLP 

"Charitable donations ranked 
fourth in spending categories 
exceeding planned spending for 



nolidtn entertaining .it home, 
non-gift clothing and holiday 
furnishings, which all il 

■harp tlcilmi's tmii! ! 

Wilker said 

I oialk Manhattan organi- 
zations are ska faeUnjj the gen 
contributions from the 
eommimitv. said Jason Lant/, ill 
rectot of opet itioni at the Mini 
Hill ii Red l mss 

Thus tai. the M-oi, . 

. d rtearij 5250,000 la 
ward relief efforts through Mini 
Milk American Red Cro 

'Whether it'fl tlimueti minu\ 
or time, ibrv are v^ illn il ti 
nut during the holidai 

said "We do experience 
peopt tnting 

to volunteer We're preparing 



for wintCf Storms, coining Willi 

the holidays and prepari 
up shelter? i<> ht i; 
don'l b,ne anywhi 

PhitanUu nnizationa 

the \inei 
fer peopli i ne) their 

rnoncj pnsiii. the 

\ni ! 
ontribute 

i .iii. mid thi 

• is aval 

"Hh 

■ 

IH'M 

"There are rt 

Will -.('end 1 1 
i nil 



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*»L-uitcsud>, HUV. I",^ J 




Timeline: 

Coach Bill Snyder's 

K State Career 



Sept. JO, 19B9: K State wins Kt first game under 
Snyder when quarterback Carl Straw hits receiver 
Frank Hernandez for » 12-yard touchdown pass to 
give the Wildcats a 20 17 victory over North Texas 
State. K-State finishes she 19B9 season 1-10. 



Not. 30, IMS 

Snyder is hired as the 
J2nd head football 
coach at K- State 



1991: K- State finishes the season 
7-4, its first winning season since 

1982 This prompted ESPN to name 
Smdfl lb National Coach of the Veat 




Oct. ».mj;!h* Wildcats 
defeat rwlKanys 10-9, the 
first of 11 (cmccuhve victories 
mtheseriesforKSt.il'' 



Dec. 29, 1993: The Wildcats appear in the program's second ever 
bowl game. K- State beats Wyoming 52-17 in the Copper Bowl in 
Tucson, Arte., giving K State its first-ever bowl wl 



Oct. 30, 1993: Snyder earns his hr.l victory over 
Oklahoma duct Am victory over a tanked team when 
the Wildcats (tefe.it the No 13 SOMWTf 21-7, It was 
K State's first win over Oklahoma in 22 years. 



1994: CNN names 
Snydei National 
Coach of the Veal. 



MICHAEL 
ASHFORD 



Sports editor 
says goodbye 

iv ii coach Hill Snyder, 
As I write this, a tear is making its way 
down ms ! was t can't quite 

j ' come to terms with the 

jj^^^ fact Ihal after Saturday's 
■fl H game against Missouri, 

silt nevei roam the 
Fp K state sideline again 
^Kf I know I'm supposed 
uj he an "unbiased" 

^1 ^L reporter, but not today. 
M lay, I am a KM 

—. *■■ I fan I am the K-State fan 

i was raised to be 
[can't even begin to 
say how hard it is to see 
iti jo I don't think I'm 
ready to see another coach on that side 
line directing the program you built from 
nothingness 

Coach, what von have done far K state 

- not just for the football team, hut lor I he 

lity that so many love and cherish 

- will ue\i-r be forgot 

You came in with a vision that one 
day, K-State would have a football team its 
nd alumni could be proud of 

Before jrotl K-State barely had a foot 
ball team. 

You envisioned a football program thai 

Stood tor integrity, class, dedication, hud 
work, all while winning games, and lots of 
them 

Well coach, you WOO more than just 
games YbU won the heart of every true, 
purple bleeding Wildcat fan oui there, and 
iliat will bi is the most 

More than tiii titles and ihe 

bowl games we K-State Luis will remem- 
ber how yon cared about every last one of 
us. And quite Eranklj 
more than 1,000 Fiesta Bowls 

To the doubters who said it could never 
DC dune .it K-State, enjoj knowing that 
ud the impossible 

You made winners out ol losers, dream- 

ts and most iinpmtanlk 

you made beueversout ofnonbeiieveni 

Al the press conference to Introdl 
you as the K- St a it coach in 1988, v 
you said the opportunitv exists at K Stale 
for the greatest turn n college tool- 

ball history, you might have been the only 
one to believe ihose words. 

I want to apologize tor every last one of 
us who thought. It simply can't be done" 

We IVS never doubled you, 

and those of us who are I rue fans never 
have doubled you since Those who did 
were I 

I nope you realize you've touched the 
lives i ** people than the 

ones who have tilled soon- to he Bill Sny- 
der Family Stadium each Saturday 

So often the little things you did for 
people went unnoticed 

When former Wildcat defensi 
dinator I'hil Bennett's wile, Nancy, was 
struck by lightning you •■ to offer 

your support and 1 i 

When formei fv State running buck 
Damn Sproles mother died Irom cancer, 
you offered your time and a shoulder to 
lean on 

When a young K- Stale fan approached 
you al a K-State basketball game and 

ad lor your autograph, and von obliged 
him by signing his photo and talking with 
him lor several mmnles afterward, you did 
more lhan sign a piece of paper, you filled 
his heart with joy. 

Tlial young boy was mc, and quite 
frankly coach, you are my role model 

Al a recent press conference, you Spoke 
about bow young people today don't have 
very many role models in this day and age 

Well coach, every little Wildcat fan, 
every kid who paints a Powvcal on his 
turday, every youngster" 

who played for you these past 17 years had 
at least one role model they could depend 
on: you 

YOU have given us 17 amazing, inspir- 
ing, Incredible years at K- State, and on 
Jf 'I every K State fan out there, I 
want to thank you irom the very bottom 
of our hearts. 

There will never be another like you 
coach. 

K Slate was never the same once you 
arrived, and K State will never be the 
sane arc gone 

Thanks Bill For everything 

Forever Snyder 

That last tear was for you, coach 



Mkhttt Mhfof d ii * senior in print Journalism. You can 
email him it tporto < spuo.fctu.f4u. 



End of an era 




Steven Doll 1 1 
Along with other spectators, Kyle Liebe. freshman in pre-journalism and mass communications, watches as coach Bill Snyder delivers his announcement of retirement 
during a press conference Tuesday afternoon. The press conference was shown in the Union Food Court so that students could watch the announcement 

Students surprised by Bill Snyder's retirement announcement 



By Ltnnn Sulzen 
KANSAS STATE COLtEGIAN 

An unusual silence filled the room 

in place of the chalkr ol friends gBth 
Sting for lunch. 

Students leaned forward in their 
seats, resting their heads in their hands 

I ej watched coach Bill Snyd 
news conference on (he big u reen TV 
in the K-Slale Student Union Tuesday 
altein 

To some, the announcement ol 
er's retirement cams as a shock. 

""To me, he is K-State football." 
said Will Janousek, junior in fisher- 



ies and wildlife biology I don't know 
what the program will be like without 
him." 

On id they were expecting 

Snyder's retirement 

I think it's the right lime," H| Bjos 
tad. sophomore in electrical engineer- 
ing, said Alter to munv years and 

winning the Big 12 Championship, 
probablj accomplished what 

ui.it. junior in theater, 
wasn't hi the i man watching the 

new lUl said she WSJ up 

sc\ when she heard the news from i 
friend Monday night. 



i ■ ..1 -J 

' nl i.iken be would 

son like- ii 
Janousek said he heard rumors 
■ I Snydei 

a and he didn't be 

"l fui 

he said 

Snyu, ois. faculty 

mil i 
they hi 

"I thud, we I i ilatkinship 

here with the administration and ilu- 
faculty and the studei bat I 

think is rather unique.' he said 'IVe 



appreciated u so irerj verj much The 
oj Kans is and the K- Staters all 

i . . 

u'evabk and you dont know tin 
,,i n 

Bjoslad said I Is K State 

be able to find sou id to 

till Snyder's place 

II von look around the Big 12 

most tie li- 
lies <>r in some waj conneel i 

Snyder" lie said 

lack said the task .1 Bni 
new coach « on ' be 

"I'm just anxious to '■ill Till 

his ■vim, s.' |a si k said. 



Players respond to coach's decision to step down 



By Anthony Mendoza 
As,ST«£C0lt[r,IAN 

Tlte message COtch Bill Snyder 
delivered lu his players and assist an i 
i complete shock to ev- 
eryone in the locker room Monday 
night alter practice. 

Snyder pondered over Ihe decision 
for the las < ighl days, he said, 

and with a media blitz and the le. 
his intentions, he *BS forced to deliver 
die message lo his players and cot 
ing staff prematurely he would retire 
after Saturday's game against Missouri. 

"It was hard. 1 wasn't prepared I 
wasn't as prepared as I needed to be al 
iiui particular point in time, bui after 

practice I talked to the coaches bd 
l hadn't had the chance to visit with the 

coaches either, so it came as a surprise 
to our learn and coaches," Snyder said 
*"l regret having lo do it thai way, bin it 
was a matter of lime as much as 
tlong There M emotional mo- 

ments during thai time, and there were 
some emotional moments alter that 

lime for coaches and players alike 
Snyder's message was a surpr 
the players because he did not show 
any emotion when he first entered (he 
locker room, senior feromey Clar\ 
but Clary said he knew somethiiv. 



different when Snyder began to address 
the team 

Iks a man who does not show too 
i no eh emotion, so when he walked in. 
we noticed nothing diffcicnl," Clary 
Wheil lie stalled talking, you no- 
ticed that somelhuiK was wrong II 

, il event I can rsmemba 
: i 
, thing He slowly toldhowhh 
a tion was, and how he tell and he fell 
that it was time for him to step down 
and move 00 to gtl beck into bvil 

family man and enjoying bis family." 
In 17 years. Snyder turned around 
1 in the four 
years prior to Ins arrival in 1988, to I 

Mm thai h 130-40-1 

moo, nil 

coach. 

luniru Mauri itets 

mymoUS with Snyder, and it will U 

hard not to have diem linked together. 
"When you third sal Stale, 

you tend to think of Bill Snyder," Mack 
When V' BUI Snyder. 

you' osas Stale .Those tv 

hand-in hand ll \ going to lie differ- 
ent coming in next year. We're going 
to have a new coach, a new coaching 
staff and everything like that, but I'm 
just going to remember (he good limes 
and the hard limes thai we've had with 




K- Stale's Maurice Mack answers question! 
Mack and other players gave their respon 

coach Snydei 

l< si aie currently sits al 4-d overall 

this season and h lUninated 

, bowl eligibility, but Mack said the 

team Wants to stud Snyder out with a 
win in his last game 



Calrtna Rawsan |tOUtCIAh 
during a Tuesday's news conference. 
es to coach Bill Snyder's retirement. 

No oilier learn, even the Big 12 

Championship team, can do whal we 

ml that's ge 
his last win," Mack said I think rhnt 
rvbody has that extra motivation to 
go and win this one for coach." 




wmammmmm 



Weuneiuay, Nov. 10, <cia>j 



0et.2«,19M:No.H 
K State whips No. 6 Kansas 
^1-7, giving Snyder his first 

win over a top W team 



Sept.21,199«iSnydef 

becomes K- Slate's 
winningest coach with a 
34-7 victory over Rice. 



r\.Ah:>HS b (Ml t cUlLtuiMN 




Net*. 21, 1998; With a 31 25 win 
over Missouri, the Wildcats cap the 
first ever undefeated regular season 
hi school history, compiling an 1 1 d 
record ami a No 1 ranking 



Page/ 



199& Snyder is named the 
Associated Press, Bobby Oodd 
foundation, Walter Camp 
I uundation and FWAA/Beai 
Bryant National (o<n:hof the Year 



Septt.2M1: 

Snyder mm Offer 
tfklory Wo. 100, 



Ok. S, 199*: Heavily favored K-State loses 
36 33 in two overtimes rjj Texas i\&M in I 
12 Championship game, knocking the In 

'HiiMi.iinin.ilifi.iinpiQnshippn!! 



Jan. l, 2001: K-State defeats Sourh 

'CmferenxepowenVw* 
Tennessee 35 2 1 hi rhe Cotton Bowl 



I 



32 
rm 
I* 

«0 

I* 



* 
A 
x> 
1 
7 

+ 

L 

e 
r* 
t. 
a 
P 



Potential 
candidates 

"For this week, we 

won't he having any 

comments on 

candickiu-s or processes, 

i'tn nol going to have 

any comment until 

after the season about 

where we go and how 

we proceed with it." 

Urn Wewr, Athletics Director 





Phil Bennett 
Head Coach, SMI) 
Bennett worked under Snyder 
from 1 999-2001 before taking 
over an embattled SMU pro- 
gram The Mustangs, who are 
3 6 this season, are the only 
team lo defeat Mountain West 
Conference champs TCU. 



Jim Leavitt 

Head Coach, South Florida 

Leavitt, who is under contract 
at South Florida through 
2009. coached at K- State from 
1990-95, The Bulls, a start-up 
program upon leavitt's arrival, 
are three victories away from 
earning a BCS bowl berth. 





Oarrell Dickey 
Head Coach, North Texas 

NorthTexas won Sun Belt 
Conference titles from 2001 
04, but is 27 this season and 
lost to K State 54-7 Dickey, a 
former K Slate quarterback, 
led the Wildcats to the T982 
Independence Bowl 



Chuck Long 

Off. Coordinator, Oklahoma 
Long played quarterback at 
Iowa from 1982 85, when 
Snyder served as the Hawk- 
eyes' offensive coordinator He 
told the Associated Press lues 
day he would be interested in 
the K State job 





Dana Dime! 

Graduate Assistant, K State 

Alter loadimc] at K Mate (tout 
1987 %, Dtmel served .v. 
head coach at Wyoming and 
Houston before returning In 
the Wildcat staff this season 
He played on the offensive 
ItneatKMate fmmlW 



Gary Patterson 

Head Coach, TCI 

Patterson was born in Lamed, 

nit played at K 
from 1 98 i 12 HetwHTO! 
toalO 1 record Palii 
told The Dallas Morning Nesvs 
late Tuesday he had n 
men! on the K Slale job 





Bob Elliott 

Oef. Coordinator, K-State 
ftliolt, who served as an as- 
sistant at Iowa before Joining 
Snyder at K State, has been 

n >rmh hot the season 
He attended Snyder's news 
conference Tuesday but left 
immediately afterward. 



Brent Venables 
Assoc. Head Coach, Oklahoma 

Vena hies, a native of Sal ma 
who played at K Stale horn 
m\ 92, goi his first job 
Irom Snyder and coached at 
K-State from 1993-98 He did 
not attend Oklahoma's regular 
Tuesday news conference. 



by the 
numbers 



1 — Big 12 Conference 
Championship 

3 — National Coach of the Year 
awards (1991, 1994 and 1998) 

6 — Big 8/1 2 Coach of the Year 
awards (1991-93,1998, 
2002 03) 

6 — Seasons with 1 1 victories 
(1997 2000, 2002 03) 



8 — Consensus First Team 
Americans 

8 — CFA National Scholar 
Athletes 



A lot of very, very wonderful 

things have taken place over 

the years in my tenure here. 

There are some things that I 

am awfully proud of and 

I know K-Staters are 

awfully proud of." 

Bill Snyder 




8 — Academic All Americans 

11 — Bowl games (1993-03) 

45 — All-American selections 

52 — Big 12 wins 

68 — First Team All-Big 8/12 
selections 

80 — Consecutive weeks ranked 
in the top 25 from 1995-2001 

1 35 — Total wins under Snyder 

MichMl Athford | KANSAS HAH mi UGUN 



Stpt 11. MM: K-State loses 45-2 1 
at home to Fresno State. K-State 
dropped out of ihe national rankings 
the next week, and the Wildcats have 

.iked since. 



(kt. 9, 2004: K State low* to 
Kansas for the first time since 
1992 with a 11-23 loss to the 
Jayhawks In Lawn- 1 



Oct t, MM. The Wildcats 
defeat Kansas 12-3. 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COlLtUIAN 



Wednesday, Nov, 16, 2w$ 



Music education major balances schoolwork, performances 




ChriitopherHinewlnckel | COlltGiAN 
Wendy Crawford, sophomore in music education, plays the piccolo 
during band practice Tuesday afternoon in McCain. Crawford has been 
playing a musical instrument since the second grade. 



By Adriann* OeWeese 

KANSAS SIAtECOUEGIAN 

William Shakespeare once 
said, "If music is the food of love. 
play on" 

For Wendy Crawford, music 
and love art synonymous. 

Crawford, sophomore in mu- 
st i- education, started her music 
v,jn*ir early in life. She began 
taking piano lessons after second 
grade and stalled playing the 
flute mftfth grade 

It was during K Stale s high 
school band day that Crawford 
decided she would attend the 
university 

1 1 heard the sounds of the 
hand, and I knew then that 1 had 
to be a part of that organization." 
she said "I think musicians are 
wired differently, and 1 had to 
come and be with all the crazy 
people. 

'We're a different breed." 

K- Slate's music education 
program is a nine-semester cur- 
riculum designed to prepare mu- 
sic teachers to teach kindergar- 
ten through 12th grade. Between 
136 and 139 hours are required 
(or graduation, depending on the 
student's emphasis Instrumental 
majors in music education are 
required to participate in K-Statc 
Marching Band for at least two 
semesters. 

In addition to professional ed- 
ucation requirements, the bach- 
elor of music education degree 
also requires 23 music classes, 



including Instrumental Condu ct- 
ing, Instrumentation and Arrang- 
ing, Piano Proficiency. 

Recital Attendance is a re- 
quired seven -semester, no-credit 
class. It would be expensive to 
give credit hours for the course, 
and it is tradition at universities 
across the country not to give 
credit, said Gary Mortenson, act- 
ing head of the Department of 
Music and professor of music 

K-State's music education 
program combines practical cur 
riculum with a theoretical and 
knowledge base of music, said 
Frank Tracz, professor of music 
and director of bands. 

Tracz, who has taught at other 
universities, said K-State's music 
education program allows stu- 
dents to develop leadership skills 
through its ensembles, like the 
marching band and symphony 
band 

He said the major requires 
outside practice to develop what 
students learn in the classroom. 

"It's a tabor of love." Tracz 
said. "I don't know anyone who 
comes in at 9 am and goes home 
at 4:30 p.m and is successful. It 
just doesn't work like that any- 
more" 

A half recital is required as a 
type of final project before grad- 
uation, and a student must meet 
piano proficiency requirements 
one semester before scheduling 
student teaching. 

Crawford said she chose In 
pursue an education degree in- 



stead of a performance degree 
because she gets nervous per 
forming. 

"With being an education ma- 
jor, I can choose when I want to 
perfonn," she said "Music is how 
I express my soul, and my -soul 
doesn't run on a schedule." 

Crawford said there is a mis- 
conception about music majors. 

"A lot of people have this no 
lion that music is a major for 
slackers," she said "But if you're 
serious about it, it's not" 

And Crawford is serious about 
her major. She has a 39 grade 
point average, and she is enrolled 
in 18 hours, with six classes, 
two ensembles and two lessons 
Crawford is in K-Stale Catband, 
inarching band and symphony 
band 

Even though this is marching 
band's last week, as the K-State 
football team did not qualify for 
a bowl game, Crawford said her 
schedule does not get easier after 
the season ends 

"Something else comes in and 
takes its place, and my schedule 
takes on a different rhythm," she 
said. "I believe in staying busy" 

A typical day for Crawford 
begins at 6 am She arrives at 
McCain Auditorium before 8:30 
a.m. to start a solid day of classes 
and ensemble rehearsals, with 
piano and flute practice during 
free time Some nights, Crawford 
can't eat dinner until nearly 10 



p.m. 



" I have a set schedule based on 



classes, but the rest varies based 
on what 1 have to accomplish for 
the day." she said. "Sometimes 
it's good to mix it up so I don't 
get bored." L. 

Crawford said she wanjrto 
teach music in an elemSjiary 
school, give private lessonfiSnd 
participate in a commun9£pr- 
chestra ~ 

"I love children, and 't^re 
freshing to be around that fS3 of 
innocence," she said. "1 waifl to 
be that kind of teacher wtafch 1 - 
spires kids to carry on withrnu- 
sic for the rest of their lives'* 

Crawford's chances of receiv- 
ing job offer as a Kansas music 
teacher are good. 

Mortenson said in the 17 
years he has taught at K- State, a 
student has never completed the 
music education program with- 
out receiving a job offer in Kan- 
sas 

With her busy schedule, 
Crawford said she has pulled the 
occasional all-nighter to stay on 
top of schoolwork. 

"Sometimes I think I should 
just stop sleeping, but I know I'd 
fall apart," she said. 

So is it worth it? You bet, C 
Crawford said. 

All of the hard work will 
make me a better person and a 
better teacher." she said. "Dr 
Tracz is always telling us, 'ft may 
seem hard now, but you'll took 
back and wish you were here be 
cause this is not as hard as real 
life"' 



Program assists alcohol-policy violators 



By Abby Brownback 

KANSAS STATE Ml If&IAN 

Residence hall ftobton ol 
K-Slates alcohol policy now 
have two options: Assessing Be- 
haviors for Change or judicial 
board 

The Assessing Behaviors inr 
Change program requires viola- 
tors to meet with their residence 
hall coordinator and discuss is 
sues in Iheir lives, then meet 
with a counselor at Counseling 
Services to create a plan to im- 
prove some aspect of their lives 
said Tanya Massey, Haymaker 
Hall residence life coordinator. 

The program is based in psy- 
etiology and behavioral change, 
said Kipp Van Dyke, residence 
life coordinator for Goodnow 
Hall. Part of the program is 
taking e-CHUG, a Web-based 



assessment that takes six to 10 
minutes to complete, 

li it an assessment tool that 
is self -guided that allows you 
to measure your alcohol intake 
to the norm," Massey said "It's 
a way for students to see how 
their alcohol intake might affect 
their regular behavior" 

The program was developed 
al the University of San Diego, 
and K-State gave il a trial run in 
2003-2004 Since its implemen- 
tation, Massey said she has seen 
a decrease in alcohol violations 
in the residence halls. 

"We have seen an increase 
in the education Bnd awareness 
students have and just being re- 
sponsible about the choices they 
make," she said 

Van Dyke said he has also 

ise in the number 

of alcohol violations since As- 



sessing Behaviors for Change 
was implemented 

However, he has only re 
ferred one of the 10 to 15 of- 
fenders he has seen this year to 
Assessing Behaviors for Change. 
This, Van Dyke said, is because 
some low- risk violators receive 
just a written warning for their 
first offense. 

Assessing Behaviors for 
Change is available only to first- 
time offenders who admit to the 
offense or to repeat offenders 
who have been referred to the 
program by their hall's judicial 
board Sixty ei gh t first-time 
offenders participated in the 
program last year, Massey said 
Two repeat offenders also went 
through the program. 



If offenders choose to go to 
a hall's judicial board instead of 
participating in Assessing Be- 
haviors for Change, the board 
generally assigns punishments 
like writing an essay or creat- 
ing a bulletin board, Van Dyke 
said. 

"The underlying thing is edu- 
cation," he said. 

In the residence halls, stu- 
dents younger than 21 are not 
allowed to have alcohol, Massey 
said. Students older than 21 can 
have alcohol with a less than 3 2 
percent alcohol content They 
cannot have hard liquor. 

"We know we're not going 
to create a dry campus," Massey 
said "We just want students to 
be responsible" 



©dug® M s Lifetime 

engagements and weddings 



"She was a 
beautiful bride." 

Once in a Lifetime, 

in the Collegian the first 
Friday of the month. 



Flu Vaccine @ Lafene Health Center 


Walk-to Masai Spray Flu 


Students 0*i's>! 1 


Vaccine Clinic 

Thursday, Nov. 17th Only healir 

the ages o( 5 
8:30— 11:30 am ^s; 

1 ;30— -4 :30 pm For restrict 

NMMdfcgW 

Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine 
available (or $22 For mor 

wwy 


ly persons between 
-49 can receive the 
it spray flu vaccine, 
on information see: 

i riiuJubouV qotaaulapny Mm 

e information go to: 
».k-state edu/lafene 




Optometrists 

Dr. Mori Bettencowl it 
Dr. RusmR Hort 


539-2020 

$20 off Nmxt 1 

Xontaci lens ffxaml 
1 J 

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Acroii from WalMafl Tire Center 






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WORLD DVU»TCNN 



"Making Life Better" 






Page 9 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov 16, 2005 



-L I I I 1 I I || II II 




LET'S RENT 



For Rerrt- 

Apl 

Unfurnished 

820 COLORADO Base- 
mcnl etflaency 420 square 
feat Patio lanced yard. 
lighted parking Shared utilit- 
ies- NO PETS January 
lease 4275 (786)776-8548. 

A LARGE one-bedroom. 

Available January 1 Close 
to campus Washer/ ttyar 
1704 Fairview (786)317- 
7713 

LIVE ONLY half WocK from 
campus and walk to class 
Huge one bedroom base 
men! apartment $400 plus 
i. in othei utilities 
Available now with 
snort term lease Emerald 
Property Management 

I / 65(656-669$ 

NEW TWO-BEDROOM du- 
pfejr close to campus all 
appliances turrusned No 
smoking no pet* (785)539- 
1975 (785)313-8296 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartment Next to campus 
Very nice Clean quiet Wa 
let/ trash pwd Parking pro- 
vided No pots (786)637- 
7050 



NEW TWO-BEDROOM 
ground Hoot apartment in 
older home meets all co- 
des new appliances includ- 
ing dishwasher very nice 
SIS flluemont available 
January no pets laundry in 
eluded $620 plus utilities 
(765)313-0462 leave met 
sage 

ONE BEDROOMS $370- 
3490 three-bedroom • 
$700- $825 (788)637.7701 

THREE-BEDROOMS 
AVAILABLE now Close to 
campus Water/ trasn paid 
Central air coin-operated 
laundry (7851537-7810 
1 785)537-2255 

TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX 
Available now to short-term 
lease Small pets okay 
$650 Emerald Property 
Management (786)558- 
8809 



For Rent- 
Mouses 

EVERYTHING NEW Tnree- 
bfldroom two bath house 
wirti garage West oi cam- 
pus Available soon Emer- 
aid Property Management, 
( 785)656 *8W 



FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 

barth, two Hocks from cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer hook- 
ups Deck with grill Quiet 
neighborhood nice yard 
nice house $14007 month 
Available immediately Call 
(620)792-1933 or maloner- 
entali* yahoo com 

HAVE YOUR own bath- 
room Four bedroom tour 
bath Walk -in close is 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
Close to Aggie vt He and cam- 
pus Available now Emerald 
Property Management 
1 786)568-6e«9 

LOOtT BRAND New 
Houm 722 Osage Four- 
bedroom, two bath washer/ 
dryer rent/ lease/ pets ne- 
gotiable 1785)556-1261 or 
I 7651776-9124 

THREE-BEDROOM 
THREE blocks soutfi of Ag- 
gieville Spacious washer/ 
dryer slove. refrigerator 
central air $876 (785)537- 
0425 or (786)632-4424 

1 45 i^tmmm^m 

Roommate 

Wanted 

Roommates needed lor 
tour-betkoom nexl to cam- 
pua. Two bath washer/ tty- 
er dishwasher No pets 
( 785)537-7060 



I THREE BEDROOM ONE 
bath bouse across from 
campus Modern appiisn 
063 central air, very dean 
Available immediately $350 
per bedroom plus utilities 

1 1735 Anderson Call KSU 
Foundation at (786)532- 
7560 pj ( 785)532* 7641 



Sublease 

FEMALE BUBU 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please contact (786)556- 
0169 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Available Immedi- 
ately. 1006 Laramie $300/ 
month plus one- 1 hi i ct utilit- 
ies 1913)775-0327 

ROOMMATES MALE or 
female pels okay Rent ne 
gotiable Washer' ck yet 
large yard one third utilities 
Call Jam ee (785)31 7 5006 

SPRING SEMESTER sub 
leaser (s) needed Nice 
clean apartmenl Close to 
campus and Aggieville 
Cheap bills No deposit 
Discounted rent $226/ 
month Call (786)202-0679 
Available December 

LET'S HELP OUR 
LOCAL CHARITIES 



Please von*. i der -i 

contribution to 

support our local 

chant les 



THINK GLOBALLY 

ACT LOCALLY, 




0321 

Snoul 
Outs 

The Collegian reserves 
the right to edit or reject 
ad copy First or leal 
namea can be accepted In 
ad copy Photo ID re- 
quired at placement Ada 
con be placed In 103 Kad* 
Be Hall $2 tor up to 20 
word* 

[,"-ji ■: AN •'■ ',1 *■» I a 
deviled egg'' I want a dev 
iied egg* H 



URTHDAY Joe C ' 



HAPPY RETIREMENT 

Coach Snyder' 

1 HA T guys you can 
oftlcaUy pack your shorts 
and sandals away until 
spring break or Christmas m 
California 



HOW MANY guys are 
'Juice" on the 



l DON 7 care il you smoke 
• in your o*vn vehicle 
with the windows up tight 

I LOST my rubber duckie it 
found shout out and Ml 
shower with you 



l REALIZE its been a ecu 
pie weeks since halloween 
but I saw a witch this morn- 
ing 

JOKE Sudani comes to a 
professor s office after hours 
and closes the door kneels 
pleadingly i would do any- 
thing to pass this exam ' 
Anything?" Absolutely any 
thing ' Would 

you study?" 

MY FAVORITE football 
player is "Rimmie" 

PAM B we love youi Take 
us to Colorado on our neat 
trip You know how to have 
(uniii 



RYAN. WHAT shall we 4c 
tor your birthday'' Drink or 

party ' 

SCREW IFC party oni 

SMOKING WITHIN 30 feet 
Of a building on campus 
who really enlorces mis' 
Just puff to the sky not 
near my eye 

TO M'v rrienrt With the cute 
pink sequenced cami it's 
cold out and one g;e dont 
fit all' 

WHO IS mat Older looking 
guy in the Marching Band 7 
Not tie one on the ladder 
Please respond) 




AnrtoUfTcemenls 

•LEARN TO FLY'" K -Slate 
Flying Club has five an 
planes and lowest rates 
Can 1785)776-1744 

www ksu eduAstc 



REAL ESTATE Auction 
Tuesday November 29 
2005 7 00 PM at 4H/Senior 
Center 1 107 S Spring Val 
ley Rd Junction Oly Kan 
saa Location of Property 
1.1112 McNeat Rd Dwignt 
Kansas From Junction 
-■Hies east on 1-70 to 
Humboldt Creek Rd at exit 
#304 then souti 1 1 miles to 
McNeal or Edwards Roads 
From there go south and 
watch tor auction signs For 
more maps drawings pho- 
tos terms and more details. 
a e a 

www SiirinitlAucton com or 
www qras sandgiain com 
See the Nov 8 issue ol 
Grass and Grain This prop 
erty consists 554 acres of 
pnmanly of pasture There is 
approximately 90 broke 
acres There is a farm home 
and outbuildings and 
creek, trees and other good 
wilcKte habitat The properly 
will be divided in 4 tracts 
and sold in a manner which 
will allow purchase of any or 
all ol Dre tracts The d vera 
ty of tie land and the scenic 
location make ffiis a desira- 
ble property lor a variety of 
usee OPEN HOUSE Sun 
day November 20th from 
200- 4 00 PM Buyet(a) to 
pay 10V down day of sale 
Your inspection Invited pnor 
to the time of sale Owners 
and auctioneers not respcm- 
s-ble for accidents The auc 
Bon firm Is working tor the 
sellers Announcements 
made sale day lake prece- 
danoe over printed matter 
RONALD L MCNEAL ES- 
TATE seller Auction ton 
ducted by a ay County Real 
Estate GREG KRETZ AND 
GAIL HAUSERMAN sales 
men and auctioneers 



0101 



Announcements 

www bobbyts com CHECK 
OUT Manhattans favorite 
restaurant and bar website 
Lots ol specials entertain 
ment t shirts endgptt eertifi- 
catea 



D2Q I 



Lost and Found 

Lost end found ada can be 
placed free tor three day* 

0301 



Posit Note 

We require a term of pic- 
ture ID (KSU, driver's li- 
cense or other) when plac- 
ing a poet a nolo 



I housing/ 



110 
For Rent- 
Apt 

Unfurnished 



WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 



Anderson Vill 
1 BD 1BA 
J460 tor January 



IS07Poyntz tl 

2 BD $600 

NEW carpet & paint 

Gas & water paid 



1 509 Poyntz 
t LG BD C $525 

Washer & Dryer 
ALL Utilities PAID 



For Rent- 
Apis Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assure* every per 
■on equal opportunity In 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account of race, 
aex. familial status milita- 
ry •talus disability reli- 
gion, age, color national 
origin or ancestry Viola- 
tion a should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources at City Hall. 
(786)687-2440 

1 TO I 

For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

MONTH MONTH Leases 
Two-bedoom. $520 Three 
bedroom $620 1510 Col- 
lege Ave |785)537-20M 



AVAILABLE SOON 1019 
Houston r 2 Three bed 
room duplen plus day room 
Screened back porch Kitch 
en appliances $695 Close 
to downtown City Park and 
Aggieville (785)539-2452 




1101 

For Rent- 

Apl 

Unturnlshed 

GREAT DEAL' SturSo apart 
ment available January t 
Five or seven month lease 
5340 all utilities paid 
178)5)4)0-6361 or 1 785)341 
4754 

JANUARY LEASE Two 
bedroom Iwo bath apart 
man! Brand new. great lo 
cation Two Clocks horn 
campus One Mock from Ag 
gieville All appliances in- 
cluding washer/ dryer 
(785)317 V}2< 
188S 

NEWLY REMODELED two- 
bedroom apartments All 
panes Available in 
December and January of 
lermg semester leases Call 
MDI all 7851776 3804 

MCI TWO BEDROOM 

walking distance from cam 
pus Water and trash paid 
Lease starts January fust or 
possibly sooner (765)672 
2317 

ONE-BEDflUOM APART 
ME NTS available now and 
in January Ottering semes- 
ter leases call MDI at 
(785)776 1604 

THREE AND lour berkoorn 
duplexes Walk io class No 
smoking no drinking no 
pets (785)539 1554 

TWO OR 1hree-P#droom 
close to campus Spacious 
central air ash washer 
launtky facility Water and 
trash paid |7BS)S3P 0666 



For Rent- 
House* 

HOUSES FOR ren1 Close 
to campus Three lour « 
Itve-bedroom (877)439 
4038 

ONE BEDROOM WALK 10 
class No smoking no drink- 
ing, no pels (785)539- 
1554 



For Sate- 
Houses 

LAKE HOUSE W0 stones 
1.700 square feet Large 
deck and screened porch 
sand beach, boat ramp 
great view' $139500 
(785)468-3531 



ForSaka- 
Moolle Homes 

2000 SCHULT 16*80 
Three-bedroom two bath 
large deck fenced li 
River chase Reduced lo 
sell Call (785)564-0904 or 
(786)565-8292 



Roommate 
Wanted 

FFMALE FOR January- 
May Two-bedroom house 
close to campus. $275/ 
month plus utilities Washer/ 
dryer Call Megan (785)306 
0131 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted Three-bedroom 
apartment hart block from 
campus $250/ month plus 
one-tnird utilities 
-■ -'..■■ I5 C ,4 

FEMALE ROOMMATE No 
I Two -bed room 

apartment Dose to cam- 
pus Oft -street | 

dryer Available irn- 
mediately (6201481 ■'.-rH'V 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
three bedroom house tor 
.ret Rem $320 
plus utilities <"•< ■ 

■ ■ -i'<i-204t- 

TEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed <-ing no 
«o-berJrooms avails 
We $300' each rji 3.486- 
2745 

NICE BRICK home Wash 
-T walk to class 

peveh storage three female 
.les S275 

bills Available January 

i 'H5.44j.2229 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
$350 one naif utilities Scon 

1795)341-5153 

SUBLEASER FOR one of 
four -bedrooms, University 
Crossing Begins January 
$275 monthly Cable trash 
washer/ dryer furnished 

■HC.r.5L".;5'j:: 

"lass No smoking 
:...■! ij no pets 
i 1554 

1501 



Sublease 



ONE BEDROOM $395 ta- 
ble' water paid Laundry/ 
pool/ hot tub on silt- 
.-.net Avaiiat.'i- 

1 785)375-301 5 

SUBLEASER NEEDED tor 
January 1 Spacious one 
bedroom close lo t 

Aggie vi m- i;.'ay.t-i -'m-i 

Sua EASE R NEEDED lor 
one loom in a three-bed- 
room house ci LeGore 
Lane Available at end of 
December untn end of July 
CaiHtil3i2P»-2982 

SUBLEASER NEEDI - 
two bedroom apaitmenl 
Chase Manhattan apart 
ments Will pay January rent 
it sgned by L 

'1-0738 1785)871 
1553 

SUBLEASER WANTFD 
Founders HW I. 
room $308 75 a mot 
bills vei> Nir.ei Call 
(765)317 1875 or |7R5|31/ 
51-45 

SUBLEASFRISI NEFDFD 
One block (TOW campus' 
Water/ trash paid Washer' 
dryei included W,i- 
second semester Call 
(316)288-962$ 

SUBLEASING A two bed 
room dose to campus Tor 
more information call 
.6201276^940 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 
MENT $400/ month al 1026 
Bertrand upper apartment 
From January through May 
II interested Call i6?0i71Cj 

6656 

TWO-BEDROOM SPA- 
CIOUS apartment sublease 
January 1- May 31 $285/ 
person Dishwasher central 
heal/ air Five m inula walk 
I o union (785)537 6880 



SuMmm 

$366/ MONTH University 
Crossing Cable, wasner/ 
dryer furnished One bed- 
room open m two^iedroom 
apartment Please call 

|1 "A I •■•lit 

1111 VATTIER '*.inr.:1 
room $550 a month Dose 
to campus 1913)645 6321 

AGGIEVILLE LOFT Lease 
from January August 2006 
Four bedroom two bath 
room new carpel $350/ 
month Moore Property 
Management 1 785)537- 
0205 

FEMALE SU8LEASER 
wanled (or spring srwiesler 
One -hall block (torn cam- 
pus $275 All utilities paid 
Call Ashley at (316)258 
7768 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted Three blocks from 
campus/ tour from Aggie 
ville Washer/ dryer $275 
month plus one hail utilities 
Call 1 795)282 5364 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted Walking distance to 
campus Large room $300 
plus one Viird utilities A van 
able Janus y 1 Please call 
(785)640 3288 

MALE SUBLEASE Wanted 
One-bedroom out of Ihree 
bedroom house Rent $300/ 
monti phis utilises Avails 
ble second semester 
1913)6313 6686 

NFED MALE or female sub- 
leaser December $275/ 
mont) plus utilities Close to 
campus (316)644-2118 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
MENT $325/ month walet 
and trash paid Close lo 
campus Available January 
1 (negotiable) Call 
(573)718-7321 or 

ajjga ja^Jrjj edu 

ONE BEDROOM OHASI 

Manhattan A par interns 
available January Call 
1785)5398366 Water/ Hash 
paid Pels allowed 



Ottlce Space 

iiLE RETAIL/ Office 
space tor lea- 

street parking 
0350 (?• 




Weight Loss ft / 
Nutrition 

55 pounds in etght 
weeks' gee, pictures and 
read my story online 
ww* loaewajil inasi cam 




Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty the financial potential of 
advemsemenfa in the Errv 
ptoymentfCaj eaj sj teal I 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor 
tunity with resectable 
caution The Collegian 
urgea our readers to con 
tact Itie Better Business 
Bureau 50) SE Jefferson 
Topokn KS 86607 HBO 
(7BS) 232 -0464 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4014 aeeurea every per 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding on 
ployment In any field of 
work or labor lor which 
he/ she is properly quali- 
fied regardleaa ot race. 
aex, military status disa- 
bility religion age color 
national origin or anesa- 
try Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (766)687 2441 

iBARTENDlNGi $300 a day 
potential No e«i>- 
necessary T< , 

144 

CATTS GYMNASTICS in 
Wamego is needing reciea 
ttonal and team coaches 
Starling pay $6 00 plus/ Mr 
depending on expenence 
and availability Call Angie 
at 765 456-8488 it interest 
ed 

OUTBOUND SALES Cm 
icpius is tie nation s leader 
in producing custom de- 
signed local government 
MtbMN CuNftl) M ■'"' 
Wring pan-tome and full-time 
tefemarketng staff to assist 
in our sales efforts Must be 
a moivated salt starter with 
strong communication skills 
Base wage plus bonuses 
equals about $16/ hour or 
higher Email resume to 

crosoff Word or tail format 

Equal Opportunity [ 



3101 



Help Wanted 

CHRISTMAS BREAK Spe 
cwl Not gong home tor lha 
holidays? Earn some money 
* have tun (rem mid De 
cember to Jan 3rd at the C 
Laiy U Gue* Ranch in the 
When work is tm 
isherj spend a week with 
-. and board to pur- 
sue yuui fa vol ne winter acti 
viies in Or and County Colo 
rado Contact Phil Dwyer al 

BUWiCi 



ECONOMIC DEVELOP 

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Una position available in 

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based upon eipeiience I of 

complete position descrip 

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in 1 00 pm Apply 

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BOOK 'Staff <s luokmg for a 
marketing assistant to help 
design promotional material 
assist with yearbook sales 
«nn panapate it marketing 
.ilary to 
help promote K States 
awaid-wlmaig yearbook 
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STUDENT NEEDING ride 
home I io Par- 

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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 16.2005 



SNYDER | Stadium to be renamed after Snyder family 



Continued Irani Purc 1 

thai I tun cotTed that, bul I know 
uh.it I can do, and believe me, I'm 
gniny lo spend some linn*, an awful 
lot itfli, because they have been so 
wonderful'' 

In keeping with the theme of 
family, Weisei announced thai, 
pending approval tnnn tin- KftMM 
Board nl Regents, KSU Stadium 
will officially hi* renamed Hill Sny- 
der Family Stadium, 

win -it wviser brought up the 
Idea of ihe name change to Sny- 
der, Weisei aaked Snyder what he 
would wani the name to be Snyder 
said if it was to be done, he would 
want ii to honor more than just 

.if 

l appreciate the feet that Tim 
(Weber) said, 'How do you want 

it named "" Snyder said. "I said, 

'Name ll after the people that I can 
about tin most.' And so it's going to 
be 1 1. imed. as I understand it, the 
Bill Snyder Family Stadium'' 
WeUer made it deaf the next 

would he dedicated to hon- 
oring Sn\ del and a search to find 
Srrydei 's replacement would not 



(20words\ 
r ,es$ / 



Come to 103 

Kedzie or call 

532-6555 



"I said, Name it (KSU 

Stadium) after the 

people that I care 

about the most/ 

And so it's going 

to he named, as I 

understand it, the 

Bill Snyder Family 

Stadium." 

Bill Snyder 

begin until sometime next week. 

I ur this week, we won't be hav- 
ing any comments about candidates 
or processes," Weiser said "This is 
a week to celebrate Coach Snyder 
and what he's accomplished " 

Once Snyder finished address- 
ing the media, he went and em- 
braced his daughter, Whitney, and 
wife, Sharon 

The family then retreated to the 
inner hallways of the Vanier Com- 



plex to spend time alone. As the 
door eased shut, it was seemingly 
the closure of Snyder's legacy at 
K-State. 

Among the list of Snyder's ac- 
complishments during his tenure 
include being one of only two teams 
in college football history to win 1 1 
games in six out of seven seasons. 
which the Wildcats achieved from 
1997-2005 

Snyder also led K-Slate to 11 
straight bowl games starting in 
1993, after the Wildcats had only 
appeared in one howl game in the 
entire program's history prior to 
Snyder's arrival 

He also was known for his phi- 
lanthropy, as he was a key sup- 
porter of Hale Library and helped 
start the university's Leadership 
Studies program. In 1999, Snyder 
was named the Kansas/Manhattan 
Citizen of the Year. 

"I think he's going out, and his 
legacy is secure," We f aid said. "His 
legacy is secure. He'll always be 
remembered as the greatest foot- 
ball coach K-State's ever had and 
probably one of the finest football 
coaches of the last generation." 



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ALL EYES ON CLENT STEWART 

Guard set to top record-setting freshman season 

Story, Page 4 



The K State s men have Questions In 

the post, but the hackcourt may be 

among the leagues best , \ 

Sltrttt. Pin 3 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

BASKETBALL PREVIEW 



Wednesday, November 16,2005 




Chri*toph»r Hanflwinckcl | CQWGIAN 
Shale* Lehning, Danielle Zanotti, JoAnn Hamlin and Marlies Gipson, K-State's four freshmen, came to K-State hoping to create their own identities alter the graduation of Kendra Wecker, Megan 
Mahoney and Laurie Koehn, 

The newface(s) of women's basketball 



By Angie Hanson 
KANSAS STAUCOlltGIAN 

When the four freshmen stepped 
QOto ""' >-'ourt at Bra ml age CoUW- 
uni for the first time this fail, there 
was a bizarre chemistry: like they 
.tin:. nly knew each other 

II i u three Kansas natives - 
Shalee Lehning, Marlies Gipson 
and JoAnn Hamlin - and Danielle 
/.anoth, ■ product ol Oklahoma, 
became acquainted this summer 
when they played on the Kansas 
Belles team that stormed the under - 
19 AAU national championship this 
summer, overwhelming its oppo- 
nent in the championship 10048 

"It gave them an opportunity 
to get lo know each other on and 
off the floor, which is important," 
coach Deb Patterson said "1 think 
it built their confidence and gave 
them a comfort level they were able 
to bring to campus when they made 
the transition here in the fall." 

The foursome has certainly had 
no problem recreating the rela- 
tionship they formed this summer 
with the rest of their teammates. In 
fact, Lehning said she already I aim 
to her new teammates as her best 
friends. 

"This group of freshmen seems to 



have melded very easily with our re- 
turners in terms of chemistry on the 
floor and in terms of chemistry off 
the floor," Patterson said. "I think 
that's a real positive for 0U team." 

The freshmen also bring the same 
winning altitude that has bfCOOM 
synonymous with K- State women's 
basketball the past four NtfOlM 
Patterson said 

"We have a group of young pen 
pie that is very committed to play 
ing Kansas State basketball and to 
keeping the stature of this program 
very high and elevated, both in the 
Big 12 Conference and nationally," 
the said. 

Lehning, a 5 foot 9 guard from 
Sublette, Kan., could be considered 
the spark plug of the freshmen. Pat- 
terson said. 

"She's a fiery competitor Bud has 
a competitive disposition un the 
Boor" Pttttsrson said <if Lehning. 
"She brings the great ability to push 
the basketball and does extremely 
well in transition ." 

Following the Patterson ideal, 
Lehning said she is ready to shed 
any selfishness and pul her team 
first 

"It's about our team and we're 

going to pul everybody first ," 

Ing said of the message I'at- 



"We're hoping to make a name for ourselves. 

They had an awesome four years, and we all 

looked up to them, but we're just ready 

to start our own tradition ." 



Martin Gifnon 

IHI',HMAN10KWAR[) 



lerson sent the freshman. "That was 
a great lesson for us because we re 
ili/i-d lhat it s not about individual 
anything anymore It's about doing 
it as a team with the people lhat you 

After the loss of forwards Kendra 
Wecker, Brie Madden and Megan 
Mahoney, Marlies Gipson, a 6-fOOl 
forward from MePherson, Kan., is 
lApei led to fill a missing void and 
command authority down low this 
year 

Gipson said although she looks 
up to last year's graduates, she and 
her teammates don't intend to play 
In the shadows of the former Wild- 
cats. 

"We're hoping to make a name 
for ourseh on said "They 

had an awesome four years, and we 
all looked up to them, but we're just 



ready to start our own tradition 

Gipson has a strong athletic 
presence on the court, and whal she 
lacks in size at the pott, 
up for in her abildty lo score nearly 
anywhere on the court, Patterson 
said 

"She's a little hit undersized as a 
post player, but 1 think what you'll 
find is she makes very \v\\ mi 
she plays with a great deal of Intel 

Hgence and she has ■ real good abil- 
ity anywhere around the paint in 
finish shots," I\i.ie.>on said "Thai's 
going to be very big for our basket- 
ball team." 

Joining Gipson is Zanotti, a b 
foot-2 forward from Yukon, Okla , 
who brings her classroom smarts 
- she was her high school valedic 
torian - lo the basketball court. 

"The first word that comes to mv 



mind when I think of Danielle, be 

is intangible. Patterson said "She's 
very smart .uid she picks ihi: 
quickly." 

I) helping 
others out on the court, Zanotti his 
yel to prove lie; sell us an offensive 
threat Still, it's the things people 
don't notice lhal /unolli excels at, 

Patterson saiii 

"She makes everyone else on the 

floor belter," Patterson said Mm 

plays defense well, she's quick lo net 

inds, she keeps vmi in offense 

and she KfMM well." 

Patterson has dubbed Zanoiti as 
one of the I a i program 

tiiso 

"She i P atte ta on ) actually referred 
I hich is the first 
time I have ever been referred to as 
that Zanotti said "1 lake that as a 
compliment when it comes to get- 
ting my teammates open " 

At 6 fool-3, nol only is |oAnn 

Hamlin the tallest on the K-State 

but she is arguably the most 

at, Patterson said of the 

Douglas, Kan , center 

" JoAnn 's the kind of young per- 
son that vflj bang I little bit in 

Set FRtSHMIM Plot « 






Page 2 



BASKETBALL PREVIEW 



Wednesday, Nov. 16,2005 



Coggins' role no longer to fit in, but to stand out 



By Anthony Mendoza 

KW.MSTATElOllEdlAN 

peats sgo, freshman 

( l.-nn- (npis tamed s K-State 
n coming off a second-round 
\.\ Ibumamenl appearance 

that would ultimately finish ihc 
u Hiy 12 Conference co- 

champ ■ 

Hopefully I'll be someone 

who can taki> care of tlie ball," 

Coggins \tiid of lit-f rota .it her 
K stale basketball media 

day "I'll feed Nicole (Ohlde) 

and Kendra (Wtckcr) whenevei 
■i open jufl nut do any- 
thingloo out -there at first" 
Now a junior, Coggun will 

be i he 1 1 ne her teaiviitKites feed 
the ball to as K State's return- 
ing leading tCORf She averaged 
iO I points per game | reason 

"Last year we had our AII- 

Amt 'i ant who basically played 
the scoring rules,' tha said "Now 
it falls more on all ol us to store 

mora. <m me a lot and a wfaole 

l"l of US" 

vvitli (he ehgibilh) deplotion 

ng scorers Wecker. Lau- 

Koehlt and Megan Ma honey, 

gins' role on the team will 

change this season front ,i role 

player to a teammate who will 

;• i t r i f r- | roajorilv of the shots 



With that comes a larger lead 
endup micas one nl only l wo re- 
turning starter* froni last season. 
Coach Deb Patterson said Cog- 
gins is ready take on the rok 

"For Claire, that will be the 
ne \t hig step for her" Patter- 
son said, "to step into that role 
ill is season BS a player with the 
potential to make a significant 
contribution and impact, and 
lo grow your own game as yon 
would expect from your fresh 
man to your junior year, to be 
coming very consistent, game in 
and game out, possession in and 
--inn out 

i think we saw a big leap 
from her freshman year to her 
sophomore year If we can get 
that same kind of leap from her 
sophomore year to her junior 

» then it's going lo bode very 
well for us and very well for her 
future development 

I ,ist season, Coggins logged 
450 more minutes than in her 
fiesliman year, playing in every 
game for the Wildcats and start- 
ing 24 of them Coggins set Cfl 
reer and season highs in all indi 
vidual statistical categories, and 
was second on the team in si 
with 40, behind Wecker 

She was one of three players 
(o score in double-digits last j 
for K-Slale in conference play 



and finished fourth on the team 
overall in minutes played. 

i ■(■ ihrnan guard Shake 
Lehning said Coggins has been 
a leader by example for her and 
the other three freshmen this 
year. 

"Claire has been an amaz- 
ing leader for us," Lehning said 
'She's been very supportive and 
she's helping us in letting us 
know what we have to do and 
how we have to do it. She's been 
great, leading by example She's 
a great person on and off the 
court and that's good for us." 

Along with leading an inex- 
perienced team, the Big 12 hon- 
orable mention selection will 
have lo maintain the versatility 
she brings to the court and han- 
dle I he basketball without hav- 
ing the talent that she had in the 
past Patterson said. 

"She found her niche in being 
surrounded by great strength in 
the rest of that lineup," Patterson 
s;ml "Now the challenge will be, 
"Who are you when you arc pri- 
marily the strength with respect 
lo experience and where those 
taking the floor with you?' There 
is not necessarily a lot of scp;ir.i 
tion between the four of you. 

it s an interesting dynam- 
ic, and I expect her to do real 
well with that," Patterson said 




Junior Claire 
Coggins is 
K- State's leading 
returning scorer 
from last season, 
when she aver- 
aged 10.1 points 
per game while 
starting 24 
games, 

Calrina R*wion 
C0UIGIAN 



Wildcats plan for Wheeler to become more of an offensive threat 




Catrlna Rawson j [01 1 EdlAN 
After blocking a K- State -fresh man record 37 shots and averaging 4.3 points per game last season, the Wild- 
cats will rely on sophomore center Shana Wheeler to provide more offense this year. 



By Anthony Mendoza 
KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 

Coach Deb Patterson did not 
need soft-spoken Shana Wheeler 
|i i score last year. 

She already had that covered 

This season Patterson I safety 
net of Kendra Wecker, Megan 
Mahoney and Laurie Koehn has 
been pulled from beneath her, 
and Ills 6 -loot I Wheeler, who 
averaged 4 3 points per game last 
season, is Patterson's lone return- 
ing starter til the pQSt 

Last year, Wheeler broke the 
22-year old K-State freshman re 
cord for blocked shots, sending 
back 37, That included blocking 
a career-high four one 

game lw> 

Wheeler's defetise in Ihc post. 
on die help side and outside tin 
three-point line displayed hat 
versatility covering opposing 
players, 

Her defense shone lasi 
but her offensive game was lost 
m the shadows. 

Wheeler was not able to keep 
up her prt after she 

named a starter in the second 
game of Big 1 2 Conference play, 
replacing senior Brie Madden 



Wheeler said she knows ihe 
team was going to need more nut 
of her offensively this year, with 
the loss of point production that 
is no longer around this season 
due to graduation 

"Last year, 1 felt like thev 
(Wecker, Mahoney and Koehn) 
were great players, and they were 
going lo make the shots a major 
ily of tin time." Wheeler said. "1 

tell better as a team pla 
that if I hey shot it, ihev USUaBj 
made it, then we would be more 
likely lo win As a team player 
last year, I thought it would he a 
smarter choice for me to be a role 
player than a scorer all the time" 

She said she worked out it 
Bramlae_e Coliseum five djfj 
week for about an hour on her 
jump shot outside IS feet and CO 
post moves She also worked on 
gelling stronger in the post, work 
ing with heavj medicine ball*- to 
increase her speed and strength 
down low 

'I've been stunned by her 
quickness this upcoming season," 
limn ir guard Twiggy Mc In tyre 
said "A move thai she didn't do 
last year, shes now dome, ! 
more confidence with her taking 
ShOtS R little 17 fool jump 



thai she usually wouldn't lake 
- and I think her confidence has 
gotten belter t-ist year was a tre- 
mendous experience foi Ket She 
got a lot of time on the court and 
that jusl helped her develop her 
game 

*Voti name H sad she's im- 
proved on it - strength, endur 
ond i ironing, everything." 

Patterson said the Wildcats 
are going to need Wheeler lo be 
more ni an offensive threat, and 
Wheeler is a significantly better 
playei with the ball than she was 
last year because of the work 
put in during Ihe offseason 

"We're going tO need her to 
put the ball in the basket We're 
going to need eight to 10 points 
a game from I rson laid 

Plus season is sboul finding out 
s going to produce for us 
While Sh.tna brought thai , 

presence 

sin nallv needed I o grow oflen 
stvely - strength- wise; dontinanl 

ly, in tanas of her mentality; and 

physically I think she s taken 
slips ihetc ,utd 1 know she will 
continue to 

frill look for her to work 
real ti.irj to I I double 

digit scorer for us this season." 



Game d ay 



starts 
with the 



KANSAS STATE 








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Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2005 



BASKETBALL PREVIEW 



Page 3 



Massey leaves big void for 
Hughes, post players to fill 



By Mark Potter 

KANSAS STATE (0UE&1AN 

After the departure of sec- 
ond team All-Big 12 Conference 
forward leremiah Massey, who 
led K-State in points per game 

and rebounds per game 
(6.9) las! season, tlie men's bas- 
ketball team has big shoes to 
fill 

Tyler Hughes, a 6-ftmt • 1 1 jii 

aid replacing Massey will 
be no eat; task 

Mr was putting up I X points 
per game, which will be hard to 
replace, but DmaWM (Diarra), 
■Seine (Afeli) and I arc going to 
try our besl lo do everything we 
can to g'l rehnunds put backs 
and whatever else we need in 
the post: Hughes said 

Hughes, Diarra and Afeli will 
liMy spin time at the pi 
k-Ni.ik" this season 

Hughes, from Olalhc, Kan,, 
averaged 2 2 points, 2.9 re- 
bounai and a team high 0.8 
hlocks per game last season 

li li jiiii Wuoldridge, 



whose decision to incorporate 
:i new motion offense that was 
personnel driven," said Hughes 
must prove he deserves more 
playing time. 

"It would certainly help our 
team if we can get him on the 
floor more, but perhaps we will 
just have to gauge that as we 
go." Wooldridge said 

I iiarra, a 6-foot-8 senior from 

; r e missed last season 

with an ankle injury. During the 
2003-04 .season, he averaged 12 
potntl and 1 2 rebounds in 16 
i lie Wildcats, 

Wooldridgc said Diarra is 
health} and could be a major 
contributor this season. 

"His practices have been re 

ally positive." Wooldridgc said 

iii i* playing athletic, and with 

liis size, we certainly need that I 
think he is going m he ■ big part 
of what we do this w 

Afeli isa till mi m junior from 
U>rdjan, Ivory Coast A lute ad- 
dition in K-State's recruiting 
class, Afeli was considered to 
he one of the lop players in the 



Ivory Coast. 

Sis-foot- 10 freshman Darren 
Keni. from Apple Valley. Minn , 
may also see minutes inside 

Kent said Diarra and Hughes 
have both played well in prac- 
tice. 

"I think Dramane and Tylci 
are the two big guys who are go 
ing (o do a lot of our rebound 
ing," Kent said. "But all the guys 
an i^oing to have lo buckle 
down and get it done." 

Lasl season, k State hmshed 
tied for eighth in the Big 12 in 

rebounds per game, averaging 

35 a contest 

While some may be skcpii 
cal ot K State \ rebounding abil- 
ity this season, Wouldridge said 

his squad has shown promise in 

practice 

"I don'! think we arc going 
to he a great rebounding team 
(but) I don't think W€ are go 
ing to be the worst rebounding 
team." Wuoldridge said. "I think 
we have people who are quick 
off then feet and have some nat- 
ural tendencies to rchuitnd" 



K-State backcourt could be strength 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS SJAtf COI If ClArt 

There is iboul 

n the backCOUrl lor the K 

men's basketball team 

will have in perform it a high 
level in order to bav< 

ful St. 

With the lot 

All Big 12 Conference 
performer Jeremiah M 

- and the appa left in 
the middle for this y 

- a greater responsibility lies 
on th. ! - is of the \\ ltd 

>n tru- 
th |im Wooldndg' 
installed 

■ ■: In help more 

scoring opportunitj 

smaller lineup, and th 

guards km>« I nit ot 

points the] rill direcUj 

affoct the • il\ In vein 

ami knew with th< athleticisiti 
are have, it w i 

■ besl In chat 

sophomore point s ■ 
Stewarl said 'He (nought that 

would and t 

think it definite!) will 
\ ) 

ihman in si rtool 

n lie averaged foi 

und putting 

him in a tie Ihj h mi. ib in Hie 

Big 12 and I Big 12 

freshmen. 

Wooldridgc said Stewarl 



be expected lo lake more oj a 
i rship role this season 
Along with StCWSfi, K-Sialtr 
has depth at the guard position 
due to the number of returning 
player* combined with a lew 

(unior Lance Harris, the 

sixth man I 

son. is a presumed starter and 
sin hi Id pi nude leadership as 
nne nt the more experienced 
. . on the I 

Sophomore Curtis Allen is 

i see more play- 

ie Hi Ills SeCOfld Vear III 

l.ul I i Id he expeels | 

lot ul improvement nut of Al- 
ison, 
lie is a very i a ten ted plaj 
1 1 I I arm said oi Allen "He's 

Uy our best athlete on the 

big things out of 
Allen He s deltnilely a 

player, and ties going to 

KOU it IhiS se. 

up nt returning 

guards is joined by several new 

LOiners uho add tn the I 

athleticism oi die team 

on joins K-State 
after temple 

Mt\ and Bast* 

noma liege v I 

peeled 
in help Slew ail wilh the point 
guard duties off the 

1 HI be able to COmi 

lench and pick up the 

ity detensiM ly and ul 

lensK bron said "I'll 

the point, be 

>.tss, and I gel 1 

thrill out ul everybody scoring 



and dunking" 

Another addition to K-State's 

haekcourt is Akeem Wright, a 
junior Who plan 

Neosho Community College 

Wright earned Mt'AA In mm 
able mention All-Ann (tica him 
ors lasi season raging 

1 1.6 points 

6.7 assists per game Doe 10 lir 
Mool-6 frail ie Wright is i\ 
peeted to plav 1 v.irieK .il posi- 
tions 

Perhaps the player who 

will have the most immediate 
impact is sophomore David 
Husk m v fi expected 

lu si an and play both the guard 
and lorward positions He 
played in a true 

freshman at Central Michigan 
and averaged &.0 point 
tnds per game 
rail, ihe backcourt bi 
K State Douid be the team's 
biggest stn wart said, 

provided the pU 
together and enough p 
time can be found tor ill ol 
them 

If that l ia plans, Stewart 
thinks K sine could surprise 
i>eiipl. li their ultimau 

goal - the NCAA Tournament 
want to gel to postsea- 
son play Stewart said W. 
don't want to settle lnr die NIT 
I to the rst. AA 
li.iun.mil. nt A lut ol ] 
Sty thai might be too much of a 
stretch, hul 1 (eel like we have 
a pretty good team, and if we 

stick together, we can do good 

filings this year" 



See a photo 
opportunity? 

Collegian 






\ i 


m 

/M Til \ 




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BMHfs » • * ' 




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1 


BULuVx * "■ *- i_i _^^^^^atfV^ 


"/A 


a^ntir 







Chrittophvr Hairwiiuk. a I 

Junior Lance Harris had ,i breakout stMson for the Wildcats lasl year, as he upped his point production from 
2.1 points per game as a freshman to 10.4 points p« tontest last season, 

Harris hopes postseason 
snub provides motivation 



By Nick Dunn 

Lam a. II: 

rellielllbel thl 

he ielt at Ihe end dI 

Harris, along ■■ 
tns tewnn tl id he fell ■ 
had done mure than 
to pi 
compete in the po 

eat 

'■ it [im 

Wooldridgc ha 

to it the 

quan 

ference tournament 

would 

ust. U ild< 
u li definite]] tl 
We had enough wl toll 

ilay in tht 

it didn't end up h 

that," li d "si hi i. 

tht returning 

in tli 

we're tookinf ■ Ming 

out then and hopeful!; 

Hn^ nJ lu- 

tournament iclei tton 

I Ie s.nd 

pilS! 1 

■Inward thl I 

i w as thinkinj 

"ol. I liavi win) 



aid "M.tv 1 "Ulcl 

even gone lo I In- \l \ \ 
nament if we had WQntomc 

ul thus..' gaiin. -li\ sure 

■ 

an- players' minds." 
Harris, a jonioi sd. 
it from Columbia Mo 
showed a vast amount ol im 

.eiuenl last cea*Ofl 
bis seuiiii; from 2 I 

to li) 4 points per game. 

In particular, Harris came on 
itrong at the end of die season, 
i points on 48 pei 
shooting ovei Ihe ■ 

His play earned him i 

aig spni during the final u 

to the mallei 
up the Wildes 
ire th \her the 

i ■ the 

'• I 
1 all ihe improvement 
ii Harris' coaches and 
■ i 

have high expect* • 

Cartiet Martin said Hi 

a the ball Hi -ding 

■ his 

lis I am e < 'lent 

' and I li.:- d up 

the offseason i 

w i ilked tO Ol 

in 

Villi 



repetition in i i 

the game 
' l didn ' 

■ with 
n. I lain 

on putting (lu 

and iting I 

Wi'll: ■-.■.au.se 

ling lired . 

thej ii.n i in 

Harris in Ihe 

well II is 

Main- 1*8 III) 

■ rship 
rule with the ii 

"Lance i^ d per 

son ' said i 

rred 
fron 
t. i ill- 
he's telling 
do. W 
hav< ams We 
■ in ili< 

pie « 

All 

coramoi '*> .\ 

W 111 ■ 

Hanr) ■' ol 

retun run 

the II 



IJafleM 



e've got the stories you've got to read. 



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Page 4 



BASKETBALL PREVIEW 



Wednesday, Nov. 16,2005 



Wooldridge says Stewart 
must be offensive spark 



By Mark Potter 

KANSMVWICOULGIAN 

Point guard Clent Stewart 
become the first true freshman 
in K State men's basketball his- 
tory to start every game last sea- 
son and set a freshman record 
for assists with 1 16. 

But prior to this season, coach 
|mi Wooldridge told Stewart, 
who averaged points per game 
for .i 529 shooting percentage, 
lit needed to improve his over- 
all game 

"Coach wanted me, during 
the offseason, to work on ball 
handling and shooting the ball a 
lot better this year, so I went to 
I In- gym and got a lot of shots off 
over the course of the summer," 
Stewart said. "I definitely have a 
|.< I nf room to improve, so that 
is what I am going to try and do 
this season." 

WOOldfidge said Stewart 

gained a lot of experience last 

i m, as he was one of two 

Wildcats to start all 29 contests 

"We gave Clent a lot of re- 
sponsibility a year ago as a 



young player, and I think that 
experience will help him be a 
better player in his sophomore 
year" Wooldridge said. 

K-State's success this season 
partly hinges on Stewart's abil- 
ity to communicate, Wooldridge 
said. 

"Can he make others bet- 
ter on the floor from his posi- 
tion? That is one of the things 1 
think good point guards do, and 
I think he's ready to take that 
step," Wooldridge said. 

While Stewart is clearly the 
starting point guard, (he sixth 
year coach named three other 
players capable of earning play 
ing time at the position senior 
Schyler Thomas, junior Ma- 
rio Taybron and junior Akcem 
Wright 

Thomas saw action in 22 
games off the bench last sea- 
son, while Taybron and Wright 
each transferred to K-Stale after 
leading their former teams in as- 
sists 

The b-foot-2 Taybron started 
six games as a true freshman at 
Temple and averaged 5.2 assists 



for Eastern Oklahoma State Col - 
lege last season Wright, listed at 
b-foot-6. dished out 6.7 assists 
per game at Neosho County 
Community College last season, 
good for fifth in the nation. 

Stewart said these players 
have contributed to an increased 
level of competition at point 
guard, which should benefit the 
team 

"Having other guys who can 
handle the hall well definitely 
brings competition," the Broken 
Arrow, Okla., native said "We 
are making each other belter on 
the court, which makes it a lot 
mi ire fun'' 

Taybron. who averaged 13 
points per game last season, 
said he and Stewart have helped 
each other become better play- 
ers, but there is no ill will M 
tween them 

"it's not even i competition" 
Taybron said "I've been helping 
him with shooting and he has 
been helping me get the offense 
down to what coach Wooldridge 
wants out of a player at point 
guard," 





Junior Twiggy 
Mclntyre will 
attempt to 
build on a 
2004-05 sea 
son in which 
she took over 
the starting 
point guard 
position. 

Cdlnna Hjwion 



Diminutive Mclntyre expected 
to carry load for K-State women 



Christopher Hartewinckel | 'OULGIMl 
Sophomore point guard Clent Stewart became the first player In K- State history to ttart the entire teaion as a true fresh- 
man. He leads a veteran Wildcat backcourt that hopes to send K- State to the postseason in 2005-06. 



FRESHMEN I Hamlin expected to be versatile post 



Continued from Page 1 

there," Patterson said. "Certainly 
more physical than we've seen 
with Nicole (Ohldel and more 
physical than we've seen with 
Shana Wheeler, and more physi- 
cal than we'll see with Marties 
Gipson" 

only is Hamlin a solid 
body in the paint, but once she 
gets the ball, she has the ahility 
to put it away, Patterson said 

I think |n Ann has a real pro- 
ficiency as a scorer, and you can 



pretty much rely on the fact that 
most catches, she's going to find 
a way to score the basketball," 
Patterson said. 

Hamlin said she considers 
herself to be flexible around the 
basket and is even working CM 
extending her shot to beyond the 
three point are. 

" I m kind of a versatile post," 
she said. "I can step out and 
shoot the three, even though I 
still need a little work on that" 

Although many have voiced 
concern about the young make- 



up of a previously All American 
laden team, Lchning, Gipson, 
Zanotti and Hamlin said they are 
willing to do whatever it takes to 
stifle the eh ill ii Hamlin said she 
can't wait to step on the court 
and let her and her teammates' 
performance speak for itself 

"They made great accom- 
plish tnd we're not going 
to make the same accomplish 
ments," Hamlin said "We're 
going to make different kinds of 
accomplishments. We're looking 
forward to being just as great" 



By Angie Hanson 
KANMS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Twiggy Mclntyre stands 5- 
fool-5, making her the shortest 
player on K- State's women's 
basketball team and one of 
the smallest players in the Big 
12 Conference The leadership 
role Mclntyre is expected to fill 
this season, however, is any- 
thing but small 

Nor is it something she is 
used 

"It's just a different mental- 
ity Mclntyre, a junior point 
guard, said of her newfound 
responsibility. "I'm in a lead- 
ership role now, and I've got 
to come outside of myself and 
become more vocal this year 
There's been a big difference." 

The difference this year is 
that the team will be more reli- 
ant on Mclntyre than she is ac- 
customed to. Last year, she was 
I sophomore who saw lime off 
the bench This year, she is a 
veteran on the team and is vy- 
ing for a starting position. 

This year, we're going to 
rely on her to be a significant 
contributor, whether that's as a 
starter or off the bench remains 
to he seen," coach Deb Patter- 
son said. "I think Twiggy, every 
year, has continued to grow in 
her overall understanding of 
playing a more dynamic game, 
and one that's not quite as 
careful as she might have been 



prune to want to play early in 
her career 

What Patterson said she 
likes about Mclntyre is her de 
sire and willingness to do what 
ever is necessary to improve 
her game 

"She's constantly stretching 
herself," Patterson said "She's 
constantly saying, 'What's the 
next thing to address, coach?' 
Then she works on that thing 

I mean, that's gold That's 
very special when you have a 
player like that " 

This summer, Mclntyre de- 
voted much of her Lime to pre- 
paring for the 2005-06 season 

"It's just a bigger sense of re 
sponsibility that 1 fell this last 
off season," Mclntyre said "I 
had to spend more time getting 
mentally prepared, as well as 
physically The obvious comes 
with shooting, dribbling - all 
those things that go with it 

Patterson said Mclntyre s 
hard work is very apparent, as 
she's watched the Oklahoma 
native make strides over the 
past couple years Last year, tt 
pecially, she said she watched 
Mclntyre develop into more ol 
an offensive threat, something 
that will be demanded of her 
this season. 

"I think as we watched her 
evolve in her sophomore year, 
she became more aggressive of- 
fensively and began to look loi 
her own shot," Patterson said 



"Good things came of it Slu 
can find her gaps, and we're 
going to need thai from her" 

Mclntyre, who averaged only 
4 7 points last year, agreed 

"As a point guard, you don't 
look to score as much, but this 
Mtaon, I think it's something 
that's wiiitg to have tit happen." 
Mclntyre ttid 

Junior guaid data 
gins said she knows what Mc 
Intyre is capable of She saw it 
in last seasons Big 12 Touma 
men! game against then -No 1 L 
Texas, where Mclnlyre boasted 
a career high 19 points in a 72- 
69 Wildcat l iine-from-behind 
win 

she was huge in our Texas 
win last year in the Big 12 Tour 
namenl," Coggins said "She 
knows what it's like to compete 
in big games We don't have our 
All-Americans and we know 
it's going to be up to us and the 
il'olir ti.tiTi in step up" 

This season is inspiring 
fur Mclnlyre because nohody 
knows what she, or the rest of 
her team, is qualified to do, 

"I'm excited to step on ilu 
court with this young group of 
ladies," she said "I know no 
one knowi tliriu No one really 
knows anything about my game 
either, or the other return- 
ing players I'm just excited to 
show what I can do and what 
this Kansas State (cam can do 
as a group" 



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Thursday, November 17,2005 



INSIDE 

K State upsets 
No. 24 Colorado 
in 5 games 

Sub Exp Data 

Historical Society 

Newspaper Seotton 
PO Box 3585 
ka K9 9 





Facebook involved in possible Honor Pledge violation 



By Owen Kennedy 

KANSMSIAHCOIIE&IAN 

A group of K- State students on 
Facebook.com arc the target of a 
possible Honor Pledge notation, ac- 
cording to the Honor System Web 
site. 

According to the 
board group wi 1 . herein- 

forrnationgivenatllieeiidofeachclass 
period for » irk'l Natural 



Malt Raple. (unior in pre p> 
sional business administration, is 
in Clark's class and said "Words of 
the Day are part of weekly online 
homework assignments 

"Questions would ask what the 
word of the day was for a certain 
class period, and if you were in class 
you knew the answer," Raple said 
"But even il rail weren't in class, 
you could find the word out from a 
1 1 iend. " 

Kaple said he did not know about 



the group until David Allen, dircc 
tor of the K-State University honor 
council, »nd Heicne Marcoux 

ciale directf'i ol the honor council, 

informed the das., ol the reporl 

"I guess Clark found out ebtJUl 
thai group and asked some honor 
council people bo Come tell us about 

It," Rapte - 

Allen said he could not comment 

nn the specifl* number oi students 

involved, hut it may include more 

than 100 



reported thai I 

Uien s^tii! TV 

led to familiar- 
ize tit.- with tin 
mid th 

All) 'iay be 

an I lonoi Pledgi Mutation i 

it invo ing ot 

class -in 

According In the Honor Sj 

Sw HONOR Pit m?»qt 10 



Honor Pledge violations 

Number ot Honor (ounot cases per school year fiom August to July. 



.'000 ■ 
JO0O2001 ■ 


H" 


■ » 


JOO 12002 ■ 




nB'"< 


200? 200^ ■■ 


>' m 1<X* InMHBnBHHH 


2005 current ■ 


■ " 





n 



1 117 



Wunt: wwtvl tl0tr.edu/h0nor 




etiolui by Chmtopher Hanewlnckel | 
King Charles, played by graduate student in speech Chris Scott, acts out a scene with Pippin's half brother Lewis, left played by freshman in theater Raynal Ch.>ren 
fant, and Pippin, played by junior in applied musk Austin Short. "Pippin" opens at 8 tonight at McCain Auditorium with shows Thursday, Friday, Saturday and a 3 
p.m. Sunday matinee. 



'Pippin sets out to discover the 

MEANING OF LIFE 



By Tessa French 
KANS1 

The musical "Pippin" will 
. iditorium 
torj 1 I used on the 
H O Hirson, 
with music end lyrics by Stephen 
Schwarti Pi bed 

uled for Nov 17- 1 o at I pja 
Nov 

■ il applied 
music, pi lei ol Pippin 

"My charactei is about in his mid 
20s, out of college and coming home 
i«i hh tatha thi laid 

"Ha begins tookui >l Intent in 

hie. through 

pawn and eventually love" 

The pta) begins with Pippin dram 
1 Itquoi bottle, taking pills 
suggestively tailing into a dream I 

slc> i 



"The plav is all -.el nt I had 

,-ed-out, psychedelic dream," 
Christopher Scott, graduate student 
• eh, said 

it plays Pippin's father King 
also kBOWB !haf< 

kirili; 

,i musical comedy and i 

think people will enjoy the elaborate 

nusii Short said 

He sings a touching solo in the 
:ming ol the play that descri 
his character's desire for something 
more 

not like other plays, the au- 
dience doesn't have to Ihink hard" 
U said "Pie iceni -ruil 

■ big," 

H describes his charactei 
tyrannical king who docs care about 
his son 

"1 play Charles the Great, and I'm 

.(rutting 1 
He said the hardest thing for him 




Pippin, played by junior in applied music Austin Short, along with Lauren Rohrer, 
sophomore in applied music, and Price Messick, senior in theater, works through 
a scene in "Pippin" the musical Monday evening McCain Auditorium 



in preparing lor the plaj was the mu- 

"l'ni not a great m 
really read music that well, and so I 
spent a hit ol time listening to tup 
SCON said 

idtrson, associate pi 



• is the d 

She said she Enco 

to come and I 
ronton then 

I hope people Come he. 
SeePIPPINPtqelO 




Curriculum change suggested 



WaeaaPeljomaoH 

With tools in hand, Daniel Robben, sophomore in landscape architec- 
ture, drafts his design for an art institute Wednesday afternoon in Seaton 
Halt. A vote next week could change a number of degree programs In 
the College of Architecture, Planning and Design. 



By Adam Hanks 

KANSmUtl COIU&IAN 

The Graduate School will VOil on I I 
posed change in curriculum in the College 
ot Architecture. Planning and Design thai 

would add two new masters degrees and 
Change several other tracks net! week 

Trie proposed alterations would change 
ever) maun from i to-aemestej bach 

■>■ program to an II semester ma 
degree program, and create a new track for 
Ihe master's degree program in regional and 
community planning and an interdisciplin- 
ary doctorate program. 

The proposal has passed through our 
college en II pi through the ^tadu- 

ate school. Faculty Senate, the Council ol 
Chief Academic Officers and the Kansas 
Hoard of Regents," Wendy Omelas 



dean for the colli 
Planning and Desi 

1 in' changes io the curriculum were >ug- 
ining of tin sanest 
put K-Stale in line with ol 

across the country, Omelas said 

"In the old days, up until tl the 

■ 
degree, said David Saelis. int. 

of the department oi Architecture 

then, there lias been the move to otter the 
first professional degree al the master's lev- 
sty five percent ol the programs in the 
Country are al the master's level and with an 

increasing number of programs moving 

in this direction 

OnteUu sjij another reason Eh chang- 
ing al' architecture majors to an 1 1 -semester 

See ARCHITECTURE P*ge 10 



16 license 
plates 
stolen 



By Leann Sullen 
KaMSI 

An unknown suspect is stealing Hi 

hides, possibly building 
up a person.il collection said Capt, |ohn 
t ioehling with unty Police 

Department 

stolen since early 
ioehling said 
Somebody is out looking for tag 

they 111 

iund and take whs 

fill iheil desire li> 

obtain a lull set, I pi 

Doehiing said tin i foi theft 

v J on what 

i In plates 

II 1 plates 

lie wall 
. it witli 

WIHtNsFPIMfSPaariO 



Regents 

approve 

name change 



Staff Reports 
MWA551MI 

Hill coach 
the filial game 

stadium that will beai his nam Saturday 
On Wednesday, the Kansas Board of 
Regents unanimously approved the imme- 
diate renaming oi ksi 
.Stadium la the Hill 
lei i anulj 1 oolbal] 
Stadium Snyder an- 
nounced rata retiremeni 
Tviest. 

lie officials plan 

io announce the change 

it the \\ il 

Oil hnali against 
Missouri 

"II is ccrutinri 
honor to approve this new name which 
reilet. is coach Snyde tndous con- 

tributions not tuitv in Kansas Stale t'ni 
versily. but abn to the rail il Kan 

lirman Mebon Ctalle 

told the Associated Pi 

Although Athletics Director Tim 

i has not ■peculated who will re 

place 1 tie 6 Snyder will 

remain until a I 

Once a successor is named, (he three 
lauonal coach ol the year will 1. 
on K S \toII as a special assistant 

to Weiset. At K State, Snyder amassed I 
18 1 and led the Wildcats 
to 11 consecutive bowl game appearances 
from 1993 to 2003. 




Snyder 



Today 



High 50 
Low 29 



Friday 



High 54 
Low 35 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Soldier accused of murder 

Defense attorneys for an infantry officer 
accused of murder said Wednesday the 
charges are based on statements from 
two soldiers already convicted of the 
crimes who want to shorten their time 
behind bars. The hearing for 2nd Lt. Erlrt 
I Anderson, 26, began with testimony 
from the first of nearly )0 expected 
witnesses. 



5 Marines Killed 

Five US Marinei were killed in fight 
ing with al Oa? da led Insurgents neat 
the Syrian border and an Army soldier 
died ot wounds suffered In Baghdad, 
malting Wednesday the second deadli- 
est day for American lotces in Iraq this 
month The soldier, from the Army's 
Task force Baghdad, died of wounds 
suffered the day before 



Internet fight unclear 

Representatives ol a number ot 
countries remained adamant that 
U.S. control must be tempered if the 
Internet is to fully reach its potential 
And even traditional allies of Washing 
ton considered it to have opened the 
doer to the possibility of more shared 
governance 



DON'T FORGET 



Jeff Sofflcy win speak of 

corporate accountability and 
the local green economy at 
7 tonight in Union Station 

"Pippin" opens at B 

tonight in McCain Audi 
ttrtam 



The Peace Carpi will have 
an Information Meeting 
from 4: JO to SJO tonight in 
the Union Stateroom 



R 



> 



1 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 17, 2005 



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\ i I) \ i . (, PXAC M' 

K Q ii k I \ G i - If I. i D F G J K 

VI I SRC B, I- I I, H (i K I S IM Rk 

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Collegian headline writer fired 



■• SYNDER TO ANNO 



r 



KANSAS 



S T 



|oe Weaver, senior in print journalism and 
k:id headline writer for the Kansas State 
Collegian, was fired this week for misspelling 
C04tc)l Hill Snyder's name on the top headline 
of the front page in Tuesday's paper. 

Editor in chief Matthew Girard said this 
wasn't the first time Weaver had an embar- 
rassing typo on a front-page headline 

"He misspelled Gorbachev' and global- 
ization' in the same headline a couple of 
weeks ago. Because Gorbachev was such u 
high profile speaker, the Collegian received 
a lot of pressure to ensure that this would 
never happen again," Girard said. 

The decision to fire Weaver was made by 
Girard. who became physically ill when he 
saw the error in Tuesday's headline. 

"When it happens once - as in the Gor- 
bachev misspelling - you let it go But when 
it happens again in two weeks, this lime mis 
spelling the name of one of K- State's most 
beloved public figures, it not only makes the 
Collegian look bad, it makes Kansas State 
look bad," Girard said. "Something had to be 
done" 

According to several report by Collegian 
siaff members, Weaver was reading random 
Chuck Ntirris facts from the Internet out 
loud in the newsroom, Girard said 

lie obviously was not doing his job, 
which entails writing and double checking 
headlines," he said 

Weaver was unavailable for commcni 



BUSH NOMINATES SELF TO SUPREME 
COURT 

In a surprise announcement on Wednes 
day. President George W Bush quickly 
nominated himself to the Supreme Court ai 
ter nominee Samuel Alilo 
withdrew his nomination. 

"Let's face il, no mat- 
ter who I nominate, the 
Democrats are going to do 
everything in their power 
to prevent confirmation," 
Bush said at a press confer- 
ence yesterday afternoon 

"By the time the Sen- 
ate will get to vote on the 
nominee after all of the 
debating and filibusters, ii 
will be 2009 I will no longer be president, 
which would allow me to take the seat on the 




Bush 

PR(iir>[NJ.'S(JPBfMI 
COURT NOMINEE 



Supreme Court." 

When asked what his qualifications la ill 
on (he hieji court were, President Bush said 
(hat his father was al one time President of 
the United States, "and if thai isn't qualifica- 
tion enough, I don't know what to." 

Bush has received much criticism for his 
most recent nomination Bush himself has 
never served on the bench His first nomina 
tion, Harriet Miers withdrew after criticism 
for lack of judicial experience 

"In selecting a nominee, I've sought to 
find an American of grace, judgment and 
unwavering devotion to the Constitution 
and laws of our country. George W Bush is 
just such a person," Bush said. "I've known 
George for more than a decade I know his 
heart I know his character" 



EMAIL SERVER SWITCHES TO PINE 

The university wide central e mail system 
will no longer be accessible through Web in ail 
or various e-mail clients, iTac announced on 
Wednesday 

"Because of the recent spike in e-mail us- 
age on campus and the resultant outages, 
re rolling back e-mail access to only be 
available within Pine," Rebecca Gnuld, diree 
tor of iTac, said. 

Pine is a text-only e-mail clienl lor the 
Unix platform Older faculty and staff may 
already be familiar with Pine, as it predates 
Webmail and Outlook 

I is ska Norman, professor in English, said 
she has continued to use Pine at home be 
cause it is considerably faster than Webmail 
Ibis announcement by iTac won't affect 
me much,' Norman said 

Lauren Davis, sophomore in open-option. 
expressed concern over the change 

"I have never even heard of Unix before 
How am I supposed lo check inv 
now?" she said She said she has used Wch 
mail exclusively since coming lo K Slate last 
(all 

"Switching back to Pine will help reduce 
the e-mail load on our servers and greatly in 
crease reliability of the system," Gould said 
"Those that depend on e-mail so much will 
just have to learn how to use Pine " 

6y Matthew P*t«rwortlt 

These news artidtt are intended for entertainment 

purposes only 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police Department's 
daily logs. The Collegun does not list wheel locks or minor traffic 
violations because of space constraints 

Tuesday, Nov. IS 

■ leremy Wilson, Wamego, Kan , was arrested at 9:09 a.m. foi 
violation of protective order. Bond was set at y,50O 

■ Andrew Schiller, 406 Osage St, was arrested at 10:35 am. lor 
failure to appear Bond was set at $750. 

■ Patsy Wright, no address given, was arrested at 12:19 p.m. for 
probation violation Bond was set at $100. 

■ Vernon Chapman, St. Louis, was arrested at 2:16 p.m. for theft 
Bond was set at $2,500 

■ Chad lemon, 5000 Turtle Creek Blvd., Lot 199, was arrested at 
4:45 p.m for probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 

Wednesday, Nov. 16 

■ Christophei Miller, 1030 Pierre St, was arrested at 1:30 am. for 
diivtng with a suspended license. Bond was set at $750 

B Felicia Conforti Grove, 2123 Indian Mound Lane, was arrested at 
4:3Sa.m.forDUI. Bond was set al $1,000, 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin board service 
Items in The calendar can be published up to three limes items might 
not appear because of space constraints but are guaranteed to appear 
or the day of the activity. To plate an item tn the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie* 116 and fill out a form ot e-mail the news editor at 
coUfgim-iyHibMu tdu by 1 1 am two days before it is to ran 

■ A class on how to find a journal artide will be from 10 30 to 
ll:30a.m today in Hale 408 

■ Hie Graduate School announces I he final oral defense of the 
doctoral dissertation of Debra Gustafson at 9 a.m. today in Bluemont 
3410. 

■ The Peace Cwps will have an information meeting from 4: 30 to 
S:J0 p.m. today in the K State Student Union Stateroom. 

■ Kori Wells and Jessica Shank will perform on the piano at 730 
tonight in All Farms Chapel 

■ The K State Relay for Life Committee will meet at 5: 30 tonight 
in Union 21 2 

■ Dr. Kevin Daruher will speak at 1 tonight in Union Station about 
the "Corporate Accountability and the Local Green tconomy." 

■ WIM"s fall Ball Bash is from 1 1 p.m. to 1 am tonight in the Union 
Recreation Center Bring canned goods for the flint Hills Breadbasket 

■ A walk-in nasal spray flu vaccine dink will be from 8 30 tn 
11:30am and 1 JGM JQprn today at later* Heath Center for 
students only 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space. If you see some 
thing that should be corrected, call news editor Krislen Roderick al 
532 6556 or e-mail 'utnbu.edu. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspa 
per at Kansas State Umversiiy, is published by Student Publlca 
tions Inc .. Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is 
abolished wK'kJjys during the school yeai and on Wednesdays 
during the summer Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS 66502. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kedne 103, Manhattan, KS 66S06 
7167, 

is Stale Collegian, 2005 



V TJttfeCaeun 
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REMINDER TO 



K-STATE CONNECTION CELL PHONE 
SUBSCRIBERS 



If you are on the K- Stale Local Plan ($37,95) md leave the K.it 
,ire,t over Thanksgiving, your minutes do not apply II you use 
your phone outside of the Kansas area, you will incur roaming 
charges. 

Please call our ullice at 532-7001 it you need additional 
information. 



More Shoes, Afore Service, 

More Friendly 

A steady throb of versatility, adaptability & 
performance. Delivers instinctive reaction to 
hard use and varying, multi-sport demands. 



ffiuwHtuSHQE^ 




New Businea Hours • Mon Sat 9 AM 6 PM 
iff Povntz Ave. » 776-66" 12 » Downtown Manhattan 




JJuZtiA if 044, § 

for 17 great years of service 

and stewardship for Kansas 

State University 

and Manhattan. Congratulations 

from the Kibachi Hut 

and Texas Star family. 

Tse 

ie«a» *!•<> call) 




""Aolto* M 



Saturday, November 19th 
10:00 am to 3:00 pm 

Open to all KSU Students 

KSU THEATRE SPRING PRODUCTIONS 
"The Underpants" by Steve Martin 

"Metamorphoses" 
by Mary Zimmerman 

"The Complete Works of 
William Shakespeare Abridged" 

Dimly Percieved Threats to the System' 

Call backs 
Monday at 6:00 pm 

No Preparation Necessary 

Reading scripts availabe in 129 Nichols Hall 

Question: Call 532-6875 



>rate 

lt\ and 

the Local Green 

Economy 

Dr. Kevin Danaher 

i i .. ,i 



I .. it! . .r 



Thursday, i T* 

at 7<» 



t living ih. • svi <i il i >ti | 
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.irul l.ibor 



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_-:.. 



, . . 



m**m 



Thursday, Nov. 17,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Student quits cold turkey because of cost 



By Adriann* DcWeese 
KANSAS STME COUEGtAI* 

It has been 13 days since Mary 
Wyrsch smoked a cigarette 

The junior in family studies 
iiiui human services finished her 
lag pack of cigarettes and quit 
i old turkey on Nov. 4. 

Wyrsch said she was firs! Of- 
fered a cigarette as a freshman in 
i school by the older girls on 
Innh school twin team She 
she only smoked a handful 
of times after that to look cool 

I always thought smoking 

wu siunid," Wyrsch said, whose 

hn has been smoking since 

Wyrsch said she started smok- 
ing an avenge of seven cigarettes 
I) last sem 

1 1 came cart ol a iliiaiful 
Btkmor something that look 

a lot out of me, I would want a 
cigarette" she said. 

Wyrsch s roommate, Erin 

merman, saw her stressed 

Mala and offered Wyrsch ciga- 

ti! -In finally pave in 



PageS 

Secondhand smoke in twrs and other 
establishments can be harmful to the 
health of employees and customers. 

and lOOfc Mia Wyrsch said sin- 
smoked Zimmerman's cigarettes 
fur a while but then started buy- 
ing her own pucks 

Wyrsch said she has tried 
quitting before. Earlier this se 
mesler, she went three days 
without a cigarette, but stress 

t the death of her pet became 
too much. 

"That's when it started up 
again," she said, "and I didn't 
even care" 

Wyrsch said her main reason 
for quitting was the o ist 

"Every lime 1 go to the te- 
station, I spend $4 imnecess.n 
ily," she said "When it wasn't 
such a part of my life before, why 
does it have to he such a pan 

now? 

Wyrsch is not using a program 
or nicotine patches to help her 
quit because she said she knows 




St«venDoH|(0i:>y*H 
Maty Wyrsch, junior in social 
work, has given up smoking cold 
turkey since her last cigarette on 
Nov, 4 arid so far has been sue 
cessful, 

she can quit on her own I he key 
is in not ft% hfired 

II i mi re lilting there and 
thinking ahnu i ii (hen vim re go- 



ing to wanl one." she said 

Wyrsch said she also 
away from other smokers at par 
lies to avoid I he temptation 

Zimmerman said she docs 
not smoke arOUIld Wyrsch and 
does not ask Wyrsch to fo out 
side with her when she smokes 

"I know it's hard fur her." said 
Zimmerman, senior in hotel and 
restaurant iiiaiwgi'ineni I 
also smoke by myself" 

Kasey Randle junior in ml 
vertising, has known W\ 
since kindergarten and the two 
started living together this 
mester Randle said she is con 
cerned about Wyrsch's health 

I'm aware her mum has 
been smoking for a ur\ long 
lime, and Mary is one of my b 
friends," Randle said I know it's 
not good for you. 

If she wanb 1 try 

to help talk her out of it" 

Wyrsch offers advice to other 
students who COtuidei quilling 
smoking; "If you watu to sm 
you can But just know that r 
are repercussions 



Substitute teacher 
salaries to increase 



Breaking smoking habit has psychological benefits 



By Adnanne DeWeese 

KANSAS SIME (OttfCIAN 

I he avenge smoker tries lo 
quit about seven times before 
eding, according to the 
American Cancer So, 

iking is ,i habit on which 
tie ire emotionally depen- 
• said Fred Newton, di 
nig professor of University 
aekngServi 

labU is not 

iall\ with one ihat people 

physiologically as part of 
■ daily make-up," Newton 

•1 Kennedy, director of 



health promotion lor Lai 
Health Center, is also (lie diree 

tor of K-Staters Inspired to Stop 
Smoking. 

A consultation service and 
medication are offered lor thOM 
who wanl lo quil, she said 

"We try lo get tu knou 
dents a link l'ii and tailor the 
program to fit their needs,' she 

Kennedy said there are physi 

eel changes when one quits 
smoking, bui they can be >■ 
QOUe. Theet include lui- 
<nns. Ugbiheadedneaa and 

coughing, she said 

"There are simple things 



Quit smoking 

1. Make the decision to quit 

2. Set a date and choose a plan 
J. Deal with withdrawal 

4. Stay quit (maintain success) 

Source; American Canrer Society 

students can do, such m deep 
ithing and i taxation 

Kennedy said 
I'svehologv has played a 
enj quit, 
■ry Fnetuan, professor 



A method that has jm 
some success is having tin quil 
ter ghn money to aomeoni 
il the quitter sueeeeds hi 01 
■he gets the money back If the 
quitter starts smoking sgai 
other person donates the n 
io .in organization the 
dislikes, Frieman said. 
Truman said psycho I. 
'i crested in Studying whv 
people smoke 

want lo know how we 
can help people Cham 
havior 



By Annette Lawless 
(ANSA KIM 

Due to tli tilute 

ban m local si boots, the 
ihattan-Ogden USD 

ap 
proved in increase sal 
emergent \ substii 
Wednesday ni 

increase is lo nu lease the 11 

bei ■ i tbe 

district and alio i 

icati 

"There's 

pen- 

lo U 

We need qti alii 

More than 5(1 have 

. enrolled in 

September, and with 
i to incn i 

Cull 

I Vt 11UIIL 

ber ol days wi tub 

aid 

■ 

■ 
cert 1 1 



some type o| degi 
hum said 

Since 2002, I I 
. ibsli hates 

but aflei the 
ipproval, these u 
■ 

rtitutc 

l compan 
school district 

In several other dt 

iniis are p.ud at the Kami 
Some districts niter u] 

; ] - 

i 

i| human 

inn c 1 1 v school 
ftn emei 
-. pet day and 

I try ini i 

1 ■ * - hers 

While some board nu 
s.od ihc pay incr 
i | i in.- .Ii-.it 
ii it the liisi step to providing 
out niivt f«n area teat ; 

■ 

means addilioniil dnl 



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tunning through il. iingol Maari. ream representatives meeting will 1 nday, 

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OPINION 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Students should 

respect K-State 

Honor Pledge 

Every student at K State has signed the 
Honor Pledge before or after taking an 
exam. 

The problem is some are just signing 
and forgetting what that signature stands 
for while they use secret 
crib sheets hidden in 
some rather interesting 
places. 

Cheating is becoming 
more of a problem as 
technology allows for 
instant communication 
anywhere, anytime. 

However, there ts no 
reason to risk an XF 
and the consequences 
of being labeled a 
cheater just to take an 
easy out in a class. 

In recent years, there 
have been an increased 
number of investigations into Honor 
Code violations. Obviously students are 
deciding the easy way is more to their lik- 
ing. 

Cheating in college classes is among 
the dumbest things students can do, close- 
ly behind stealing stop signs or recreating 
"Jackass" stunts. 

Students who break this pledge deserve 
whatever punishment is dealt to them. 

It is a dark path; cheating leads to 
increased scrutiny by professors which 
leads to more Honor Pledge investiga- 
tions eventually rooting out those who 
cheat. 

Basically, cheating is not only dumb, 
but it leads to getting caught 

Save yourselves the trouble of cheating 
and dealing with the consequence. Grow 
up, act responsible and do your own 
work. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor They can be 
submrtted by e-mail to letlmmpubisuedu, or In person to 
Kedzie 1 16 Please Include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 2S0 words, Ml submitted 
letters may be edited tor length and clarity. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 1 7, 2005 



To the point is an 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed Tnis is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barn at 
Abby Brown back 
Matthaw Girard 
Matt Go may 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoia 
Alex Peak 
Catrina Rawson 
Krlsten Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



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CONTACT US 





Kansas State CoHegian Classified ads., 532-6555 

KeddelO! Newsroom S32-*S56 

Manhattan, KS MS02 nflw0SDufthu.edu 

Display ads 5H-6S60 Delivery problems 5J2-«5S 



Flag blind 



Bush wrong for linking troop support to war, criticism of opponents 



In |ohn Prine's song "Your l ; lag 
Decal Won't Get You Into Heaven 
Anymore" ha describes a man so 
patriotic that he continu- 
ally covers his windshield 
in American Flag Dec iK 

Eventually, the man is 
unable to see because of 
the deeals, crashes into 
a tree and ascends to 
heaven. 

Upon reaching the 
pearly gales, the chorus 
breaks in reminding the 
man lhat heaven is already 
crowded from our "dirty 
little war," Even though he 
had collected so many flags, they 
weren't enough to get him into 
heaven. 

Al- 
though 
this song 
was origi- 
nally written 
for the Vietnam 
War, Prine has 
recently brought 
it out of a 25-year 
retirement due to 
a similar problem 
we are facing 
today, 

The only dif- 
ference is that 
during the Viet- 
nam period, the 
protesters were 
the ones who 
had a problem 
separating the war 
from the warrior 
Their ignorance 
quickly led to them 

laling the 
evils of war with 
the men drafted to 
do a job nobody 
else wanted The 
events that took 
place when the soldiers 
returned home were despicable 

Now it is President Bush who is 
making this horrendous mistake 
His recent speeches have included 
sharp criticisms of those who op- 
pose the war. 

In a speech on Nov 1 1, Bush 




ZACHARY T. 
ECKELS 



went as far as to suggest that op- 
posing his administration for its 
war efforts hurt American troops 
and empowered the en- 
emy. It seems he is once 
again trying to suggest that 
bad war translates into 
bad soldiers. 

It is understand- 
able that anti-war speech 
may be perceived as 
encouraging an enemy 
However, it is far more 
important to let our gov- 
ernment know we don't 
support these wars and 
avoid future confronta- 
tiuns 

The real question is how the 
message to the troops could be 



considered wrong. Is it really belter 
to celebrate a war that should have 
been avoided? 

Of course not, as long as you are 
;ible to tell the difference between 
the war and the warrior. 

When one is able to separate the 
two, it becomes no problem under 
standing why it is good to criticize 
an administration that so easily 
and carelessly threw our troops 
into battle After all, if it wasn't 
for these troops, a draft would be 
necessary and it could very easily 
be you or me over there right now. 

People simply can't let Bush 
get away with attempting horrible 
tactics to gain support for his war. 
It is not only disrespectful, but it 
also leads to fanatics on both sides 



From anti-war groups spitting on 
Vietnam soldiers coming home 
to the anti-gay and an li -military 
groups protesting funerals, things 
have gone too far. 

To all of you out there who still 
blindly support the war due to 
whatever reason you have, I sug- 
gest you remove at least a few of 
those decals from your windshield 
It is OK if you aren't able to see 
the warm glow of liberalism jusi 
yet, but hopefully you can begin to 
understand lhat neither the United 
States nor its president is infallible 



Zacna ry T. Eckels is • |un lor I n pri nt jou mat 
ism. Please send your comments to 
■MMUpA ktu.edu. 




illustration* by Kent Holl« 



Catholics shut doors to homosexuals 



There is good news for Catho 
lies everywhere. According to II 
Giornalc, an Italian newspaper, 
the Vatican is due to 
release a new list of rules 
on Nov 29 barring from 
the seminary men who 
"support" gay culture or 
have "deeply rooted" gay 
tendencies. 

Now the Catholic 
Church has elevated a de- 
bate already taking place 
in the United Methodist 
Church and the United 
States Episcopalian 
Church, 

Seven archbishops from Africa, 
the West Indies and Asia attended 
the Hope and a Future Conference 
in Pittsburgh, Penn They want to 
split from the Episcopalian church 
and adhere to the Anglican doc- 
trine found overseas. 

What has the archbishops in 
an uproar is the move of the U.S. 
Episcopalian Church to include 
homosexuals and ordain a homo 
sexual bishop, thereby including 
people instead of driving them 
away. 

Not to be left out, the United 
Methodist Church recently reaf- 
firmed its decision to defrock the 
Rev Elizabeth Stroud for living 
with her lesbian partner She is 
now a lay minister in the church 

Equally timely, a pastor within 
the Methodist church was rein- 
stated after being suspended for 
refusing to allow a parishioner to 
transfer to his church because the 
man was an "unrepentant homo 
sexual," according to the Florida 
Baptist Witness 

Repenting for the way God 




LOtA 

SHRIMPLIN 



made you should be a prerequisite 
for membership in any church 
"Anglicanism is really now in a 
state of flux We are being 
forced into this by people 
who are teaching some 
thing new and something 
totally different," Arch- 
bishop Drexel W Gonuta 
of the West Indies told 
Fox News 

He is a member 
of the Anglican Com 
munion Network and 
attended Ihe Hope and a 
Future conference. 

The Second \.iii 
can Council caused a rift within 
the Catholic Church and the 
United Methodist Church crisis 
revolves around interpretation 
of the Book of Discipline, while 
Episcopalians are 
dividing over viola 
tions of the Wind- 
sor Report. 

The Report 
is a peace treaty 
between the 
conservative and 
liberal factions of 
the Episcopalian 
church It orders 
liberal bishops not 
to ordain any more 
homosexuals and 
conservatives not to 
establish bulkheads 
in liberal diocese. 

Nothing says 
love and accep- 
tance like establish- 
ing bulkheads. In 
the words of Jesus, 
"Forgive them, 
Father They know 



not what they do " 

Religion shouldn't be a (rater 
nity/sorontv type thing. It's not 
in us or them ideal Jesus plays 
predominately in most Protestant 
religions, and he preached Ion of 
all, but his message is getting list 
in the debate 

Religion should he Inclusive 
not exclusive We all need to get 
over the "God likes us better than 
you" idea If God created life 
then he or she treated all life gay, 
straight, right or left-handed - All 
of us. 

fttul didn't leach me to hate If 
the Anglican Communion Net- 
work is threatened by homosexu- 
als worshiping their god, then let 
them create their own church in 
the United States If Catholics 
are so desperate to keep gays out 



ol the church that tluv would 
insinuate the pedophile problem is 
because of gay priests ilun I don't 
need them, either 

I don't understand the Bible so 
I'm writing my own Acceptance 
of differences toleflUICI "I oth- 
ers and love (cm uii i retlurei will 
be my Book of Discipline I dont 
care if people are gay or straight 
I just care if Ihey treat others with 
respt 



Lola Shr itnplln n * senior in pre journalism 
Pitas* tend your comments to opinion *ipub. 
tsu.etfu. 





CAMPUS FOURUM 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's 
anonymous call-in system The (Durum Is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, wist, obscene 
and libelous comments The comments 
are not the opinion of the Collegian nor 
are they endorsed by the editorial staff 

You wo«ld have ta to i monumental 
dumbass to think that tearing down the 
goal posts somehow honors Bill Snyder. 

teed >eb forgetting Veterans Day, 

Collegian Now I'm not going to your 
birthday party 



Kady cooper, you haw an awesome 
talent for writing, but you make me sick. 
Write about something worth reading 

fvridge, commit to NU, Snitch leaves 
Play for KSU, Snyder leaves What's the 
deal' Is there a curse? 

Saturday, everyone storm the told 
and tear down the goal posts. Coach 
deserves It. Thanks for the legacy, coach 

It's nice to see that the Collegian honors 
the best coach we've ever had by spelling 



his name wrong We'll miss you, Snyder 

To the Collegian weather man — you 

sack. Rod Stewart could do a better job 
than you. 

Ye*, know what would to wild? If we 
went outside of our house, ran around It 
screaming and then ran Inside realty fast 
Farmhouse, you guys are crazy 

Irs "Snyder," not "Synder." 

Snyder doesn't like ft when the goal 



posts come down. If you were real fans 

you would know that, so in honor of him 
let the players carry him off the held to a 
standing ovation and leave the goal posts 
as they are. 

KSU Stadium: "The House that Bill built." 



e, do you smile when you get your 
picture taken? We all love you though 

Drtka for Coach, Seriously, let Tim 
Weiser know that we want Mike Dltka for 
coach, not tome no-name like Phil Ben- 



nett. Visit "Bltka foi Coach" on ratebook 

Nice that the Collegian knows how 
to spell Me name of the most important 
man on campus S -N-Y-D-t-R. notS-V- 
N D t R 

I have a totter Idea. Instead of tearing 
down what Snyder built, lets 
leave the goal posts up. 

As a tribute to Snyder, I think I am go- 
ing to sprint on the held, tackle a Big 12 
referee, do the KSU chant and then shake 



Snyder's hand Will anyone bail me out of 
jail when it's all done? 

Hey tody, here's another synonym for 
"flatulence' (o put into your thoughtsau- 
r us: your articles 

Oh, yeah? Well I tot my tutor can trans 
late the graph ol a parabola better man 
yours ever could. 



Meed mort fourum? Go to w\ 

ham for the full vtoion 



*w.kttatt 



Thursday, Nov. 1 7, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



International Week teaches students other cultures 



Daniel Aguilar, 
graduate student 
in sociology, 
talks to a small 
group about 
the Columbian 
conflict Wednes- 
day afternoon In 
a K-Stare Student 
Union meeting 
room. 

Christopher 

Hanewinchtl 
COUECMN 




By Abby Brownback 

KANSAS SIAIKOUIOIHN 

Four international students 
gave praasntations on political is- 
sues in their respective countries 
;is [iart of In: nal Educa< 

lion Week on Wedm 

Daniel Aguilur, uruduate mu 
dent in sociology, explained 
lombiaS distribution of power. 

"We have a probleTll ol wealth 
distribution,* he said "Anil 

have a problem <>i luid distribu- 
tion, ami we have a problem of 

pW erty." 

Agujlar said the richest HI per- 
cent of Colombia's population 

earn 43 percent of the national 

Income while the poorest 10 per 
cent earns only 1 percent of the 



national Income 

huan Lin, Danfelk N|j 
fcha and Bala [hiaaanjafl spoke 

on the structure of pprammenl 
and politics in Taiwan, Cameroon 

and EndJa, respectively 

I'hclsie Burden sophomore 
in animal sciences and industrj 
said she attended because ol \n 
AmbaaBadors' promotion of di 
versiu awartiuui and to laarri 
about international buauu 

The presentations were pari 
oflnieni.nion.il Education W 
which started during the Clinton 
iinbtratior n ol 

the Department "t Slate and tfu 
Department of Bducatiori 

Siuih.i Hani Pisipali pri 

Internationa] Coordinating 
Council and graduate student in 



International Education 
Fair 

When: i l ,i m. to 1 p.m. today 
Where: K Suu Mutter* Union Cfturtyjrd 
How much: I f« 

English, said tile Week Was de- 
nt to inform students about 

the cultun ducauon of oth- 

wtntriea 

Study abroad director lender 
id universities na- 
tionwide Intematii I 

Education Week this week 

■Ui believe the Intematiorj 

■ i the campus 

iut education, sin- said. 
"People arc dtiiem ol the world 
now rhe world is global, and gle 

■ isn't going lOgO away" 



Smoke In bars can be damaging to patrons', bartenders' health 



By Lota Shrimplln 

KANSAS MATE ( 01 LEO IAN 

Adverse effects from second- 
hand smoke can affect people af- 
ter only 15 minutes of exposure, 

I Carol Kennedy, director 
of health promotions at Lafene 
Health Center. 

There's not been any safe 
level (ol cigarette smoke) deter 
mined," Kennedy said 

Cigarettes untairt more than 

4.(100 chemicals, at least 60 of 

which are considered carcino- 

i. according to the Mayo 



Clinic. They include carbon 
monoxide, benzopyrene, meth- 
ane, arsenic and cyanide. 

People who smoke become 
ill more frequently, and ttlOSC 
who are asthmatic should never 
be around anyone who smokes, 
Kennedy said 

Smoking is allowed at Past 
Eddy's. A large part of the clien- 
tele is military, and the soldiers 
tend to smoke while they play 
pool and drink, co-owner Coty 
Gilman said 

1 1 icy probably smoke a lot 
more now than I hey will in a few 



years, when (the war in Iraq) is 
over," he said 

Fast Eddy's has always had 
ventilation to disperse the smoke, 
and it is upgraded on a regular 
basis The main filler is changed 
yearly and then art two fillers 
coinciding with Hie main filtet 
that are changed weekly, co- 
owner John Gilman said 

1 ast Eddy's also has an 
dilioners that bring in outside air 
to dissipate the smoke he said. 

Because Fast Fddy's is not 
a restaurant, the business is 
not required to have a non- 



smoking section 

In 2000 Rusft/8 Next Door 
b e ca me Manhattan's first non 
smoking bar 

Kusly's Outback and Kusty's 
Last Chance .illou STOOl 
and no one has complained loo 
much about the level ol smoke in 
(he air, hartender Becky Stftnes 
said 

"Even the nonsmokers, when 

they drink and get drunk, they 
smoke," Sit 

Ben Hake, junior in account 
said smoke does not affect 

i students who go out 



"It depends on wlv n mj 

friends ,, that 

Ins roommate works li 

and his work clothes smell nt 

He-, inn allowed I 
clothes In it"' room," Hbr< said 
Working in Vggieville at busi 
lay open after the 
close sometime 
problems when students who 

. e in 

restaurants, said lirati 
junior in pre professional 

lary education and an associ 
i Pita I'n 



Fuji said he t ■ ^ ihattan 

will eventual!) ban smoking in 
all businesses mst as Lawn ■ 
did 

it Manhattan were In pass a 

ban, Coty Gilman said 

n shouldn't be limited to the 

Manhattan area, due to the 

ive unpad on 
I die 

Bccatisi m, me patrons 
from the mil rears los 

. ss to function * 

Kili'\ count Gil 

man said 



po 

the 



an 



IF 



Overuse of word 'like' not a factor in hiring process jf 



By Leann Sulzen 

M« SAS STATE COUKtAN 

I Hspite the popularity of the 
word "like" in 

students are not being denied job 

lortunities because nf over 
tig the word, said Kerri Day 

Keller director of Career and 

Employment Se rvioes 

t think the total piece of emu 
munication is what you say, the 
tone of voice and the nun verba I 
language that you u aid 

Kevin Wagner, senioi 
idem ni Community first 
National Bank, said If job appli- 
id ' like" I 

interview, he hasn't noticed it 

'I can't think "t anyone ■ 

I hat word ." he said, 



Keller said during an inter 
view, recruiters are not criticiz- 
ing applicants' grammar skills 
Instead they are looking at the 

applicants answers to the ques 

Wagner said he focuses on 

other parts of the interview, in- 
eluding another repetitive word 
often used to fill time 

ng'um' and not looking at 
us while we are talking to them is 
what I look for' ha said 

.Although using 'um' while 
trying to find something to say is 
discouraged, Wagner said he en 
courages applicants to take a mo- 
nienl before giving a response 

sorely appmpri 
ate, because ii SHOWS 10 UM tliev 
are giving thoughtful consider 



"Pauses are entirely 
appropriate, because 
it shows to me they are 
giving thoughtful con- 
sideration to what we're 
asking." 

K#vtrt Wagner 

SENIOR VICM 
COMMUNITY I IRSI NATIONAL BANK 

alion to what we It i .long," he 
said 

Keller said students can use 
mock interviews through CES to 

not using the 
words like' and um loo often 

"One of the reasons we 
mock mien, i >rtunitics 



for students is that it ii an op- 
portunity fur students to ■■ 
they have a p , tttem of 

■ ill nut be working 

to their a<K 

However, Keller said students 

lid not locus too much on 

their speech patterns during an 

in tan 

"I'd km I It ills to gel 

onsciantiouB when they get 

into an interview situation that 

they only locus on their speech 
patterns, she said. 



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Page 6 




CEDRIQUE 
FLEMMING 



r < 



NFL playoff 
picture 

becoming 
clearer 



I he Dallas Cowboys stunned 
the Philadelphia Eagles in the 
fourth quarter on Monday Night 
Football, scor- 
ing 14 points 
in a 2 1 -second 
span en route 
to a 21-20 
comeback vic- 
tory. 

The Cow- 
boys' victory 
capped off a 
Week 10 that 
was full nl sur- 
prises 

Nathan 
Vasher of the Chicago Bears 
returned a missed field goal 108 
yards for a touchdown during 
the second quarter of the Bears* 
17-9 victory over the San Fran- 
cisco 49ers The return broke 
the record for the longest play m 
NFL history, and Vasher' s Jersey . 
and the ball are going to the Pro ! 
Football Hall of Fame in Can* 
ton. Ohiu 

The Minnesota Vikings soolMI 
a touchdown on a kickoff, punt*** 
and interception return against 
the New York Giants in a 24-2) 
victors. No team in NFL history 
has iiivimiplished'Uiut feat. 

But the records and surprises 
arc only a part of what makes 
the NFL so exciting 

Tile playoff picture is becom*. 
ing clearer with seven weeks 
remaining, and it Is time to begin 
debating which teams will mate- ■ 
it deep into the playoffs. 

The Indianapolis Colts are 
undefeated and appear to be th% . 
clear favorites to make the APOfa 
Championship Game, where 
they will likely play the Denver 
Broncos 

Indianapolis quarterback Pqt- k 
ton Manning is starting (o put 
up the same type of numbers as 
a year ago, when he broke Dan 
Marino's single-season record for 
touchdown passes. The Colts are 
poised to become just the second 
team in NFL history to have an 
undefeated regular season, join- 
ing the 1972 Miami Dolphins. 

The Broncos have won seven 
i >f their last eight games behind 
quarterback fake Plurruner's 13 
touchdowns and seven consecu- 
tive games without an intercep- 
tion 

In the NFC, the Carolina 
Panthers are destined for the 
championship game behind re- 
ceiver Steve Smith's league-lead- 
ing 937 receiving yards and nine 
TDs 

Which team will play oppo- 
site the Panthers, who are riding 
a six game winning streak, is still 
a toss-up. 

The Seattle Seahawks boast 
the league's best running back in 
Shaun Alexander while 
Chicago's defense has been 
amazing this season 

But my money is on the Cow- 
boys playing for the conference 
championship and a spot in Su- 
per Bowl 

Dallas has been in one game 
this season that was decided 
by more than six points, and 
that was a 33-10 blowout of the 
Philadelphia Eagles on Oct. 9. 

The Cowboys' 6-3 record 
leads the NFC East, and lately, 
they have shown the poise and 
resiliency needed to win close 
games after losing heartbreakers 
to Seattle and the Washington 
Redskins 

The rest of the season will be 
exciting regardless of who tnakes 
the playoffs as teams begin to 
make the post-season push. 



(•drte-it FlMMifcsf Is a Junior In print 
joum iliim and hofctttt. Ym can t-mal Ms* 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




C -trln* R*WiOH 1 1 (Ji I f (MAN 

K-State'i Megan Kroeker goes for a kill against Colorado's All'e Griffin Wednesday evening in the Wildcat's win over the Buffaloes. 
The Wildcat's beat the Buffaloes in a five-game win, J 2 (19-30, 30-21. 28-30. 30 23, 18 161. 

Exorcising demons 

Kroeker carries 
Wildcats against 
No. 24 Colorado 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS S1MK0IUGIAN 

The holidays came early for the 
K State women's volleyball team, on 
Nov. 16 to be Had 

In K State's 3-2 (19-30, 30-21, 28- 
30, 30-23, 18-16) victory over No. 24 
Colorado Wednesday night, the Buffa- 
loes handed the Wildcats a few much- 
nceded presents; K-State's first victory 
against a ranked opponent since it 
defeated then -No, 23 Texas A&M mi 
Oct. 1, the Cats' first home win since 
they beat Iowa State on Oct 8 and the 
upper hand against Colorado in the 
Big 12 Conferei 

Most importantly, the Buffs (18-9, 
9-8 Big 12) helped K- State find what it 
was missing most - its heart 

"We got some heart, that's what 
happened," junior Joy Hamlin said. 
"Confidence is important, but heart is 
vital." 

The Wildcats' heart arrived in the 
nick of time. The Cats have been bat- 
tling inconsistency, leadership prob- 
lems and a lack of intensity throughout 
the season. 

On Wednesday, the Wildcats (14- 




9, 10 8) faced their demons head on. 
coach Suzie Fritz said. 

"I think our team is starting to real- 
ize we need to play with more passion 
and more heart, and I saw glimpses of 
that in our team tonight," Fritz said 
"We played consistent, which is some- 
thing we've been demanding and light 
ing and, something we've been striving 
for all season ." 

Games two through five were t|» 
best the Wildcats have played all sea- 
son, Fritz said 

Game one, on the other hand, was 
I glimpse of the K-State squad that lost 
five of its last eight games That team 
allowed the Buffaloes to hit .605 as a 
team compared to K-State's .243 

You're thinking, 'Nobody can 
maintain that kind of pace,"' Fritz said. 

Hamlin had one thought. 



Agata Rezende 
celebrates with 
Megan Kroeker and 
other members of the 
women's volleyball 
team after their five- 
game win Wednesday 
evening at Abeam 
Field House. 

Christopher Han*wintka< 

"It's not K»irig to happen again," she 
said 

The Wildcats came alive, and game* 
two through five and gave K-State vol- 
leyball fans what they needed this week 
- some excitement. 

The last hour and a-haif of play 
saw 50 ties and countless lead chang- 
es Redshlrt -freshman Megan Kroeker 
played strong throughout for the Cats, 
hitting 15 -for- 29 for a 500 hitting per- 
centage, with only one error 

We were relaxed but intense, at the 
same time," Kroeker said "We knew 
what we had to do, but we had to do it 
calmly and not just run around." 

When asked if K-State keeps its 
heart and maintains its composure, 
could the season end on a high note, 
Hamlin had only one remark 

"Yeah, for sure," Hamlin said, 



EQUESTRIAN 



K-State set for showdown with Black Hawk 



By. 

WHSASS^MtCOUiOM 

A showdown is brewing this 
weekend lor K-Stat* equestrian' i 
Western team. 

The Wildcats travel to Kav 
wartnee. Ill, on Saturday and 
Sunday for the last show of Use 
fall season, wfiere they will com- 
pete against nine other teams In 
their region K-Stale currently 
has a 35 point lead over Black 



t 



Hawk Community College, 

Although the Wildcats have 
a substantial lead in the rvy 
coach Teresa Slough said the 
team will need to stay focused 
throughout the show to main- 
tain, or even increase, its lead. 

•We'd really like to keep this 
lead win both shows and come 
hortie further ahead," Slough 



The Wildcats will compete 
against Black Hawk 



fourth time this season, 

Junior Sara Welter said Black 
Hawk challenged K-State the 
last time the two teams met. 

"1 guess I expect them to 
be at good aa they have been 
- probably better, because it's 
"wn show," Weller said. 
"At the last show they definitely 
challenged us. They were on top 
of their game" 

Along with the advantage 
of beating the Wildcats the last 



time out, Black Hawk will have 
an additional Advantage. 

"We use their horses, they 
have been riding them nil year, 
and It's our first time to be on 
them, so it gives them a home- 
field advantage" sophomore 
I.uidsey Salsbury said- 
Regardless of the arena, 
Black Hawk has provided the 
most competition to K-State 
throughout the course of the 
season, Slough said 



Slough also said she expects 
Black Hawk to be competitive 
this weekend, and in order for 
the Western team to win, the 
Wildcats must ride well, remain 
focused and have a game plan. 

"It's tough when your tough- 
est competition is the one host- 
ing the show," Slough said. "I 
think that Black Hawk will be 
very competitive They will be 
geared up and motivated to do 
well" 



Thursday, Nov. 17,2005 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

CVB | Fritz signs Tope ka 
native for 2006 season 

■ Coach Suzie Frit; announced 
Wednesday the signing of Kelsey 
Chlpman, a Topeka native, to the 
K-State volleyball team lor the 2006 
season. 

Chipman is a 6 foot l middle 
blocker out of Washburn Rural High 
School. Chipman earned first team 
All- State honors in 2004 and was cited 
on the first team of the All State 6A 
Toumamenl team from 2003-OS. 

During the 2005 season, Chipman 
led the Blues with 313 kills, a 479 
bitting percentage and 93 total blocks 
in 44 matches. 

She is the daughter of Bob and 
Carol Chipman. and her father played 
basketball for the Wildcats in 1972-73 
and Is the men's basketball coach at 
Washburn University 



CVB | Cats place 8 on 
Academic All-Big 12 team 

the K-State volleyball team 
had eight student athletes eam 
Academic All-Big 12 Conference honors 
Wednesday. The eight selections were 
the most for K State since the intep 
tionof the Big 12 in 19%, when the 
Wildcats had nine honorees. 

K-State's first team selections 
were juniors Joy Hamlin, anthropology; 
Jamie Perkins, nutrition sciences pre 
medkine; Sandy Werner, kinesiology; 
sophomores Angie Lastra, biology, and 
Stacey Spiegelberg, life sciences/pre 
nursing, and redshirt freshman fenny 
lantsch, business Ihe Wildcats' second 
team selections were senior Katie 
Stanzel, marketing, and sophomore Rita 
I thorn, social science. 

To qualify, student athletes must 
maintain a 3.00 GPA or higher either 
cumulative or the two previous semes 
ters and must have participated in 
60 percent other team's scheduled 
contests 



SPT | K-State to offer 
'Ultimate Wildcat Weekend' 

The K-State Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics announced 
Wednesday that the upcoming 
weekend will be the "Ultimate Wildut 
Weekend" 

The K-State men's basketball 
team plays host Georgia Southern in 
its season opener at 7 p.m., Friday at 
Bramlage Coliseum fans who show 
a ticket for the K-State vs Missouri 
football game can purchase a basket 
ball general admission ticket for $10 

Football tickets for rhrK Siatevs 
Missouri game at 1 10 p m , Saturday 
are still available Fans are encouraged 
to bring hand held signs to the game 
supporting coach Bill Snyder. 

The Wildcat weekend comes to a 
dose as the K State women's basketball 
team takes on Detroit in its season 
home opener at 2 p m . Sunday at 
Bramlage 

fans who present their ticket stub 
from the weekend's football game ot 
men's basketball game will receive 
admission for SI 



WBB | Heidnck and Waller 
join K-State radio network 

Formei Wildiats Missy Decker 
Heidntk and Kristin Rethman Waller 
will join play by play announcer Brian 
Smolier on the K-State Sports Network 
for Wildcat women's basketball radio 
broadcasts during the upcoming 
2005-06 season 

Hetdhck, a guard for the Wildcats 
from 1993-97, rejoins the radio network 
as a color analyst for 1 7 games of the 
itason. Hetdnck currently serves as 
senior coordinator for special programs 
at the University of Kansas Medical 
Center In Kansas City 

One of the best three-point 
shooters In Big 12 Conference and 
school history from 1998-02, Waller 
enters her first season as a color 
analyst. 

She will provide color for eight 
games during the season Waller 
currently serves as assistant compliance 
director for the K-State Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics and is pursuing 
» master's degree In journalism and 
mass communications. 



The Associated Press 

SPT | Congress puts other 

pro sports leagues on notice 

WASHINGTON -Congress Is 
sending a message to the NFL, NBA, 
NHL and their players: Now that 
baseball strengthened Its steroids 
policy, we're turning our attention to 
you. 

But those other leagues and 
unions aren't necessarily planning to 
get right to work rewriting drug-testing 
programs that already have been 
made tougher since lawmakers begin 
focusing on the issue eight months ago 

"We don't think we need to stm>n 
our penalties," NFL Haven Association 
em uthre director Oene Upshaw said 
Wednesday. "Let Congress ad If they 
want w." 









I 



mmm 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 



EDGE 



i* *at 



Thursday, Nov, 1 7, 2fr)5 




Page 7 



True love (can) wait 

Some students decide not to have sex until marriage 



By Lola Shrimpltn and J. Scott Bowman 

KANSAS STWFCOLLEGIAN 

Some evangelists believe college 
campuses are hotbeds of fornication, 
but not all students at K- State think 
having sex is a priority in life 

Kelly Huerter. junior in market ing, 
said students who abstain from sex be 
li >re marriage do so [or many reasons 

The students who wait to have sex 
until they are married do so because of 
belief systems instilled in them by their 
churches and families, he said Some 
consider their sexuality a gift to be 
only in a secure relationship 

"I feel thai I am solid in knowing that 
I am right in waiting." Hucrter said 

Religion plays a major role in many 
of Huerter's beliefs, he said Values n 
stilled in him by his family and faith 
lead him to practice abstinence 

Huerter said he attends Christian 
Challenge, a nondenominational wor- 
ship group, where values are discussed 
and support is given to those who 
choose not to have sex before marriage 

University Counseling Services does 
not have a specific program in place to 



deal with students facing the issue of ab 
Staining from | »re- marital sex, Counsel - 
:"iychology intern Naoko 
Kinoshita said, 

"We don't have anything that specifi- 
cally targets (abstinence) ," she said "We 
have relationship groups, but that 

tends to deal with students fight- 
ing with roommates or with their 
parent^. 

Many students have sought 
the advice of the Kev Don 
Fallon, a graduate of the 
Menninger marriage COM 
seli n g program and 
d inali ii of religious ac- 
tivities in the student life 
Fallon has been 
helping students through 

ital counseling for years. 

"I think a majority of people I see 
have engaged in pre-marital engage- 
ments," Fallon said " t guess their values 
reflect their family and religious back 
ground, and they may be more on the 
liberal side But with almost all of them, 
sex is an expression of love and com- 
mitment." 

Some students who have families 




i hat encourage more strict religious be 
liefs may face a situation rd to 

overcome. Faflofl said 

"People with be- 

liefs might feel a great guilt oi anxiety 
with pre i: It might be a situ- 

ation where tluv have the inability to 
adjust to a certain lifestyle and 

can go with sototung, ilrinkirtg 
nr church," he 

I illnn said the btt 
portant thing to consider" b 
the person someone is with 
and if he or she is having sex 
for the right reasons 

"Sometimes students are nol 
choosing .i very healthy lifestyle," 
Fallon said "1 see some people 
having sex for the NTong reason, 
such as low self-esteem or people 
acting out of a conflict with their 
family or parents 

"When I speak of acting out, that 
might mean holding on or eont rolling 
another person and even to the extent 
of getting pregnant to hold on to a per- 
son" 

\pnlln Okwuone, junior in social 
science, said there are differences be- 



Abstinence 

What it is 

Abstinence means to not have se» Abstinence 
is when couples choose not to have any kind of 
vaginal, anal ui oral sex. You can still express 
yourself sexually when you choose not to have 
vaginal, anal 01 oral sex Some of these ways ate 
Holding hands, flirting, kissing, massage, touching 
other parts of your partner's body and sfcirmo, 
fantasies 

Hew to use It 

Know and understand why you haw made It* 
choice not to have vex Talk to your partner about 
what you want and don't want Ask your partner 
whit he or she wants Mike a decision about what 
kinds of things are nght for both of you, 

Searce? tvww.feesfasrtt .ore 

(ween sex and love, and sometimes K 
can be difficult to understand the differ- 

"Some people substitute (sex) for 
love,* Okwuone said "It can be used for 
different things. Love is more of a com- 
promise It's not just a single action. It's 
yean of hard work." 



Add warmth to holiday celebrations with spiced drinks 



By Kelly Schmrtt 

KANSAS STATE COl lUIAN 

"Us the season lor holiday celebrations 
A great addition to the homemade cook- 
ies and candies served at these gatherings 
is hot apple cider or hot, spiced tea. 

Both of these recipes require a tittle 
advanced preparation time before serving 
but most of the wait time is in heating the 
beverage rather than making them, 

Instead of heating up regular apple 
cider, this cider recipe features a rich fla- 
vor with allspice, cinnamon and cloves 
The flavors simmer together into a velvet y- 
smooth texture that soothes the senses. In 
the process, the cider fills a house with a 
welcoming holiday scent 

The spiced cranberry tea is a deliriously 
tart beverage The spices and juices meld 
together into a flavorful blend that is not 
overly sweet. Although it is a tea, it is a 
favorite with children as well as adults. 




Spiced tea, cider recipes 



Hot spiced cranberry tea 

4 nips of water 

1 tup of sugar 

3/4 tup of not cinnamon undies 

(Red Hots) 

IStlOvesftiasUainer) 

1 quart of cranberry ju> 

Wan of fro?w orange juice 

4 cups of liquid tea 

I cinnamon 

2/ J cup of lemon juice 

jar, Red Hols and 
doves until sugat dissolves. Add the 
remaining InnreoV: 

ikes one o rdtta. 



if preferred, use a > 

putting the cloves and cinnamon stick 

in the basket and heating the toffee 

pot Defoliates. 



Spiced hot apple cider 



1 gallon of apple cider 
) teaspoon of allspice 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon 

1 teaspoon of whole doves 

2 sticks of cinnamon 



itmredlenK and ttrnnftTrW 30 
mlntiM, out do not boll. Sew hot 




■ 



HOROSCOPES 



Aquarius (Jan. 21 Feb. IS) 

Excellent lime to show the world that 
plaid and stripes dr> 
mh (Tip 112 of Arnold 
Pinknobbte's'HnwloGet 
Noticed") 

FlKestfeb 19 March 20) 

HYou K heard thai when 
economists use the word 
"nice' they're actually saying 
lhauomerhmgishomosce 
dasticand iwuuWregresfw lodayyou 
will find out what they mean when flat) 
say something r. like totally kj 

Aries (March 21 April 19) 
You feel like you re slowly 
being crushed it work in a 
mental and spiritual sense 
Perhaps travel would refresh 
you? lot jptrttoaOy benefkJal travel, I 
usually ctasufi my neighborhood Astral 
Travel Agency 

Taurus (April 20 May 20) 
« hy you wrfll be struck by 

% N the notion that "life is like one 

of those little cars that the 
Shnners gel to drive You have a 
mind of great depth and profundity 

Gemini (May 21 June 20) 

Soon, through no fault 04 your own, you 

will catch someone underlining 

words in a libraiy i 

one of those signs, yem know' 

Before the Apocalypse 

Cancer (June 21 July 22) 
ton will heai .i mange 
rjkkmg sound toda) 

• n- walking thtough the 
kitchen ■ m the toenail iforft 

you think' 

leo (July 23 Aug. 22) 

Today you will dtscovei a hair . -^ 
growing in an odd i> 
worry about it unless the odd 
place is your eye 



Youw 
' byat 
< tluLv 



Virgo (Aug, 21 Sept. 22) 

You will be overly impressed 

scommeniatfoiagolf 
ch describes it as a 

' -in reilihlf : ■ 
and poweiYiui will 
nervoii 
weapo. 

Miajfe 

Libra (Sept. 2 1 Oct 22) 

Today yau will rescue sew. 
hostages from a hi 



Scorpio (Oct 21 Nov. 21) 

foda) ,i.i will have a 

L i ;■ ■niidhiiltMnl idea 
inornate the 
U S federal detr 
just pretend ttifie isn't one," you II say 

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 Dec, 21) 

Through a casual remark in -^ 

an elevator, you will reali/e 

that both you and your 

fellow passenger have seen 

John i leeses informational 

film called "How To irritate People.' By 

the lime you reach the 10th flour, you 

will both he levtrtt) veted with one 

another 

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20) 
After years of study in higher mathe 
malics, and a fiendishly complicated 
^ topological pioof. you will 

times better than no bread 



finally be able lo prove that 
half j loaf ts exactly 7 412 



Souk* Hu morse opt 



UPCOMING 
SHOWS 

Tonight 



CourtMyi 



: Split Lip Raytield and The White 
Ghost Shivers 
:21+,10pm 
: Auntie Mae's Parlor. 61b N 
12th St 

Saturday, Nov. 19 

Who: kipper's Cradle, Asleep for 
Dreaming and Broken Toys 
When; 18+, 9 p.m. 
Where: PJ's Bar 112" Laramie St. 

Tuesday, Nov. 22 

Who: Buck and Talon 

:21 •,10p.m. 

: Auntie Mar's Parlor, 616 N. 
12th St 

Wednesday, Nov. 23 

Who: Shaggy Green Carpet with The 

Symphony 

When: 18+, 10 pm 

i: PJ's Bar, 1129 Laramie St 



Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 1 7, 2005 



Internet sales on the rise 



By Annette Lawless 

KAN'.' iblAN 

V |hc holidays approach, li>- 

ial bu sin e sse s are nut just e 

pt'ting against each other 

ording In a 2005 U.S. 
Census Bureau report, Man- 
hatiaM a ill bet heavy 

competition from v commerce 
ihis holiday sea 

Hie reo 
timatc of I) ;■> retail e 

econd quarter nj 
2005 totaled $19 8 Wilton, i J 5 
perccni in> 1 u j 1 1 - 1 r 

Ur 

l'u compete with the online 
industry, tome local bu 
men have joined tin ■ 
tttion by launching Intemel 
butimn sites, including Sara 
Slrothmaii, owner ol Zot 
tire, 12(V> 

"When we first launched the 
site l figured raj past i i 
ers would have bought Erom it," 
Strothman van! "However, a 
lot of my curreni custom 



l'n mi all over the IS I barely 
sell to people in Kansas right 
now 

After owning Zotcis Attire for 
bur years. Strothman said her 
business needed a boost, so she 
decided to try (he online indus 
Hy Since the launch of her Web 
Strothman said Ihe site has 

Etnwn crowds ol new customers 

Erom nearly -to Mates 

Manhattan resident Monica 

Keller said she shops online be- 
i i iveniencc of e- 
commerce soviet - 

"How i' an you beat aging 
online and finding exactly what 
you want - color, rise, shape 

and all 1 " Keller said "Si 
places sell items at black market 
prices, offer me free shipping 
and retlim shipping They offer 
RK a money hack guanntl 
wiq should I have to leave my 
apartment to ^et my stuff" 
While some customers val* 
rmvenience others said 
i .■! more confident walk 
Ing inlo a store and talking to a 



sales associate 

"If you have a problem with 
the product, you can just walk 
straight back to the store and 
confront the company itself." 
Manhattan resident Richard 
Douglas said. "Online, the pro- 
cess for returns is maddening." 

But some customers are will 
ing to take die risk in order to 
get a variety of products in a 
short time frame. 

"1 have bought anything from 
clothes to DVDs to a computer 
online," Manhattan resident 
Brian Carlson said "If you are a 
collector, you could spend hours 
looking for it locally or 15 min 
utes shopping for it on eBay" 

Although shopping for some 
items on the Internet is difficult, 
Carlson said if shoppers are pa 
tient, they might find a better 
deal. 

"It takes lime to find the bet 
ter deal online," he said "But 
sometimes you have to sacrifice, 
buy locally, and pay 25 percent 
more," 



Children's author visits Manhattan 



By Logan C. Adams 

wwsusswrecrxiiGwui 

The Manhattan lliblic Li 
brary will be 
giving books 
tonight 
when it is host 
to author Debi 
GlJOrj and a 
reading of her 
hook No 

Matter What" 

Glion who 

lives in Scot 

land, writes 

and illustrates her own children's 

hooks and is visiting Manhattan 

Bit Of the Kansas Heads to 
Preschoolers program, a pan ol 

ie Book, One State i ■ 

ol the Stati 




Gliori 

umtos 



Jennifer Adams, youth ser- 
vices manager at the library, 
said the evening will start with 
a book signing and sale at 6 30 
p .in. Then at 7 p.m., there will 
be a special reading with a prize 
for young children 

Glion will read "No Mat- 
ter What" and other children's 
she has authored and il- 
lustrated, and then every child 
will get a copy of the new book. 

The book is ahout a young 
Eon named "Small" and its care- 
taker. "Big," 

rj shows uncondi- 
tional love as "Small" presents 
"Big" with several scenarios 
in which the youngster would 
become | let) appealing thing, 
such as an ill tempered croco- 
dile 



After each situation, "Big" 
reaffirms thai "Small" would be 
loved no matter what 

Adams said the book does 
not assign specific roles to "Big," 
just that of lOIMOne who takes 
care of the younger fox She said 
(his lets the story apply to other 
caretakers like grandparents, 
older siblings or guardians, 

"It's kind of a reassuring sto 
ry," she said 

Adams said the Manhattan 
Library Association paid for the 
purchase of 500 copies of the 
book and donated some to local 
registered day care providers 

At 7:30 pm., there will be a 
final session for older children, 
as well as adults, to learn from 
Gliori about writing and illus- 
trating their books 



Different perspective 




Steven Dt;M 

Bryce Ackerman, freshman In pre -professional business administration, takes a shot over Chris Ballard, 
freshman in pre journalism and mass communications, while playing basketball in wheelchairs at the Derby 
Complex basketball courts Wednesday. The event was part of Disability Awareness Week at Moore Hall. 





December 27, 2005 - January 11, 2006 



■ late course descriptions, unci prereq'" 
2-56(.' ^:!. J or v>',ri the Division nf Contimjir. >n at 131 



tor on-eampus counewotk will be $164 per uniwgmdunk resident credit hour and $227 per graduate resident codit hour, plus Si pei da/ 
special and health lue-, A student services tee and/or maloriats lee may 0a required lor some courses A $ 14 per eredn hour lee is assessed for 
Engineering and Architecture courses 



ARCHITECTURE. PLANNING, a DESIGN 

Design Graphics and Visual Thinking 
Pro/Advanced Design Graphics/Visual Thinking 

ARTS A SCIENCES 

Forensk Medicine 4 the Investigation of Death 

■p as Liter- 
The History ot Insurgency on American 

T hg History ot American Movies end the Movie-Gomg Experience 
Sport and Exercise Personality 
Philanthropy end Corporate Communitsiion 

Kansas City and Ihe Southwest 
Social Construction ol So rial Murder 



BUSINESS 

Achieving Career Success Developing Personal Competencies, 

Outwitting Opponents, A Avoiding Common Cere** Traps 
Intra i ratal Quality Management 



EDUCATION 

Stress Management 

Stress Management tor Teachers, Counselors, and Administrator? 

Early field Experience 

ENGINEERING 

CAD in Engwioeong and Const ru 

CAD m Engineering and Com 

Energy and Environmental Impacts Related lo Su sin inability 

Introduction to information Technology 

Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet Applications 

Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applications 

Topics In Construcllofi Management Building Conn 

Topics in Const ructton Management Tilt -Up Concrete 

Structures in Construction Management 
Introduction to Total Quality Management 



Hazwopar Training 



HUMAN ECOLOGY 

Topees; Introduction to Inlani Mental Health 

Raising Emotionally Healthy Children 
Problems in FSHS Family Law 
Introduction to Mamago and FemlJy Therapy 
Topic*; Premarital Education and Counseling 

isf in Long-Term Cart! Administration 
Lodging Management Theory 



Course » 


flef* 


Credit 


Oerrs 


Timu 


GRSC 


94I0» 


•VG 


t/5-1'11 


MTWUF 6 00 AM-4 30 PM 


LAR 310 


iMioa 


3UG 


12/27-1/11 


MTWUF 1 30 PM-4 .30 PM 


lAFt 741 


9.1110 




12/27- I'll 


MTWUF 1 30 PKM:30 


ANTH084 


Miia 


3 Ul 


1-31/10 


MTWi am B 00 PM 


296 


94 MB 


2 UG 


1710 


MTWUF 12 hi PM 








I2/27-IM1 


MTWUtVOCJ I'M- 10.00 PM 


HIST : 


94117 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/11 


MTWUF 1 00 PM 5 00 PM 


MN '■ 


94121 


1/G 


12/27- 1/11 


MTWUt 9:00 At 




Miaa 




12r27 1/11 


MTWUf 9 00 AM- 18 30 PM 


MUSH 


94124 


3 UG 


1/11 


MTWUf i 00 PM-4?i 


SOCK 


94126 


Q/6 


1 2/29-1 /1 1 


MTWUF 1 00 PM-5 30 PM 
Sa9 0« AM-s 00 PM 




94129 


3 UQ 


12/30- 1'H 


MTWUFSa 900 AM-'. 


GENBA 496 


94131 


JUG 


12/2/ 


MTWUF8 30Afv' 


MANi. 


94133 


1 UG 


l/fl-1/9 


■■..■ PM 

'.0 AM 1 00 PM 

PM 


"502 


94142 


3 U( 


12/27 i 11 


MTWUF 3 30 PM-fi.30 PM 


■ 


14146 




M/11 


MTWUF 3 :30 PM 




94148 




12/27 1 M 


APPT 


ARE 








MTWUF 6 00 AM- 12> i 


ARE 




2 UG 


1 2/27- 1/11 


MTWI 


CHE 650 






1/4 I 


WUF 6 00 AM-5 00 PM 


CIS H 




1 UG 


12/27-12/29 


TWU BOO AM-12 10 PM 


CIS 102 




1 uc. 


1/4 


WUF 8:00 AM-12:10PM 


CIS II 


94156 




1/11 


MTCWBO0 AM 12 10 PM 


CMS 644 


94169 


2 U0 


12/28-1/1! 


MTWUF 1 00 PM-4;00 PM 


CNS644 




2 UG/G 


12/27-1 H 


MTWUF flllO AM- 11 '30 AM 


DEN 300 


leiM 


1 UG 


1/6-1/9 


■0 PM 
Sa 8:30 AM-1 00 PM 

* i PM' 


DEN 39B 


I410Q 


3 UG7N* 


1/6 


TWUF 8.00 AM- 7 00 PM 




Mita 


auo 


12/27-1/11 


MTWU6 30 AM -\ 00 PM 


700 


B41M 


3 UG/G 




MTWUF 1 00 PM-4 45 PM 




94101 


3 UG/G 


.-1/11 


TWUF 11 30 AM-12 15 PM 


FSHS 708 


94166 


a UQ 




MTWi i Ptyy 


IN 6t0 


94171 


3 UG/G 


, -I'll 




HMIMU 004 


94180 


3 UG/G 




M t W Ur 9 JO *\M- ' 1 >\i PM 



VERIFY ALL COURSE INFORMATION BY CHECKING THE WEBSITE PRIOR TO THE FIRST OAV OF CLASS 



Division of Continuing Education 

www.dce.ksu.edu/intersessiofi 







mmmm 



■sws*s*a*s>J 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Thursday, Nov. 17,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 9 



Q/l 1 



II ■!■■ 



-II II 'I'' II 

:: L 1 u s: ■!_■_ ■■ 




Office Spat .^ 



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For Rent- 
Apt. 

Unfurnished 

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A LARGE one- bedroom. 

Available January t Clow 
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NEW TWO-BEDROOM du 

plex close to campus, all 

appliance: lurnished No 

pttt (785)539- 

: ' . **»'113-B296 

THREE BEDROOMS 
AVAILABLE now I 
i afllptts Waler/ trash paid 
.peraled 
laundry (785)537 7810, 
1/9^)537-2255 

ONE BEDROOMS $370 
$490. three- bed rooms 

(700- $825 i78S(537-7701 



NEW TWO-BEDROOM 

ground Hoar a part moot in 
older home, meets alt co- 
des, now appliances inclod 
ing dishwasher, very nice. 
SI 5 Bluemont, available 
January, no pels, laundry In 
3620 plus utilities. 
(785)313-0462. leave mes- 

'■■rlfjl ' 

TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX 

Available now lor short -term 
> i ■ Smull pets okay 
$550 Emerald Properly 
Managemem. (785)556- 
5899 



For Rent- 
Houses 

EVERYTHING NEW Three 
bedroom, iwo bath house 
with garage West ot I ...im 
pus Available soon Enter 
aid Property Management. 
(785)556-6899 

fOUH BEDROOM. TWO 
baVl duplex One-hall mile 
from campus Washer; dryer 
included Single properly 
owner No pels No smok- 
ing 1410 Houston Number 
Two (785)776 9260. 

LOOK BRAND New 
House 722 Osage Four- 
bedroom, two bath, washer/ 
dryer, rem/ lease/ pets ne- 
gotiable (785)556-1281 or 
(785)771 



FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 
bath, two blocks from cam 
pus Washer/ dryer hook 
ups Deck with grill Ouiel 
neighborhood, nice yaid. 
nice house $1400/ month 
Available immediately Call 
(620)792-1933 or makjner 
yahoo com 

HAVE VOUH own balh 
room Four- bedroom, lour 
hair, Walk -in closets 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
Close to Aggieviilo and cam- 
pus Available now Emerald 

(785)556-6899 

riiRF E-BEOBOOM. 
ntocks south ol Ag- 
gteville. Spacious, washer/ 
dryer, sieve, retn 
central air $675. (785)537- 
9425 or (785)532-4434. 



Roommate 

BEDROOM AVAILABLE 
January I. Beauiliui throe- 
bedroom, two bath house 
near Westloop No deposit 
or lease Furnished it need 
•rj 1785)587-9997 

Roommates needed tor 
tour-bedroom next to cam- 
pus. Two oath, washer/ dry- 
er, dishwasher No pels. 
(765)537-7050 



Sublease 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please rorilarl (785)556- 
0169 



FFMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Available immedi- 
ately. 1006 Laramie $300/ 
month plus one-third utilit- 
ies (913)775-0:127 

FEMAIE SUBLEASER 

wanted: $230/ month Four- 
bedroom house neil In 
campus Pets allowed. 
Washer/ dryer Chelsea 
(314)660-1942 



ROOMMATES MALE or 
female pels ukny Rani ne- 
gotiable Washer/ dryer, 

large yard, on 

CHI James <7B5|31? yj06 



SPRING SEMESTER sub- 
teaser(s) needed n>< ■ 
clean apartment Close lo 
campus and Aggteville 
Cheap bills No deposit 
Discounted rent: 1225/ 
month Call (785)202-0678 
a./, I labia Dai embei 




0321 



The Collegian reserves 
the right to edit or reiect 
ad copy First or last 
names can be accepted in 
ad copy Photo ID re- 
quired at placement Ads 
can be placed In 103 Ked- 
ne Hail, 12 tor up to 20 



AHE THERE foal smuils m 
SmurthwaJU*'' 



ARIEL, I want iny pumpkin 
back VrjD know who 

oys who small 
good So go buy some co- 

MAi i i rtv YOU'RE the 
love ol my lite I dont know 
wtiti in do without you as 

ley sweetie Diet 

HAVMAKF.n BOYS =■ smelly 
■fflpSl 

I AM the only one that has 
noticed that boys in Hay 
matter donl shower evert 

I HEARD a ■ 

lOUd the nlhi.ir rl.iy 

blew . ,ti 



CM SIT 

thinking about how the Door 

■■jp rnov- 

Ing ' ..'urn ■';,, ..(y male) I Hop! 

MARY . 

NEEDED STALKER to lol- 
sjnd my crush II 
■• meet me al Ihe 

■xl court Will bo 
e*f paid 

OPERATOR CAM I help 

ymj ' 

SYNDFR, OH wail I mean 
Snyder you'll be missed 

THE THIRD floor ol FORD 
HALL IS THE BEST' 



THANKS FOR not hilling on 
our Stats professor this 
week, ii was so much easier 
lo concentrate with 
OrtOQeM 

THE GOAL posts are com 
ing down this weekend' 
Rush the field, rush the tietdt 

TO THE boy that lives 

'torn me m n 
rjr. whn 
rammg from you room? 

TO IHE (jtn In the frag hat. 
It, Ed 

WALTERS DON'T you 
want lo lind out who she is 7 
I can halp if you |usl search 

lor me clue two 



000 

hulltt m 




010 



Announcements 



■aj 

air. 



I r Afiri 

live 

planes and lowest rales 
(785)776 1744 
wwwksu wn - 



www.bobbyts.com CHECK 

OUT Manhattan's favorite 

ml and bar website 

.il ... ..i il: Mill ' ,n 

-nirts, and gitl certrfl- 
tales 



For Rent- 
Apts. Furnished 



Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without dlstlnc 
lion on account of race. 
sen. familial status mililn 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age, color, national 
origin or ancestry Viola 
lions should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources at City Hall, 
(785)587-2440. 



1101 
For Renl- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

AVAILABLE SCON 10 tB 

iie-bed- 
,rn-im duple* plus day room 
Screened back porch Kiteh 
en appaanoes $696 Close 
lo downtown City Park and 
Aggievllle (786)341 1380 



NOW LEASING 



1 TO I 

For Renl- 

Apt 

Unfurnished 



020 J 



Lost and Found 



Loat and found ada can be 
placed free tor three days. 

030 I 



rust a Nc 



We require a form of pic- 
lure ID (KSU. driver's li- 
cense or other) when plac- 
ing a post a note. 

I hoimngr 1 



Lost something? 
You "n p . dce 

dn a <* FHBE for 
thr ee daysf 



WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 



Anderson Village 

1 B0 ISA 
$460 for January 



l507Poyntz#1 

2 BD 9 $600 

NEW carpet & paint 

Gas & water paid 



1509 Poyntz 
1 LG BD O $525 
Washed & Dryer 

ALL Utilities PAID 



■ 

►"bfOOrl 



537-9064 



GREAT OEAI 

ment available January 1 
Five of seven month lease 
$340 . paid 

(785)410-6361 or (7B5)34l 

JANUARY LEASE Two 

bedroom, two bath apart- 
ment Brand new. great (o 
cation Two blocks from 
campus One block from Ag 
All appliances in- 
cluding washer/ dryer 
(785)317-5326 Or (316)6.10 
1885 

MONTH- MONTH Leases 
Two-bedrnom. $520 Three 
bedroom, $620 1510 Col 
lege Ave (785)537 2096 

NICE TWO BEDROOM, 
walking distance Irom cam 
pus Water and trash paid 
lea*! Ktlll January Ural K 
possibly sooner (785)672- 
23t7 

ONE AND two-beri'oi mi-, 
dose lo campus, central-air. 
parking laundry (785)539 
5800.(785)537-6017 




110 1 

For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

ANO tour-bedroom 
dupraxaa WW* id i lew No 

smoking, no drinking, no 
pel* (7851539 155-1 

TWO OR three bedroom 
close lo campus Spacious, 
dishwasher, 
laundry lacllity Water and 
trash paid (765)539-0866 



For Rent 
Houses 

FOUR BEDROOM TWO 
bathi iwo kill liens very 
15)778- 
8628 (785)341 4i- 

HOUSES FOR rent Close 
lo campus Three tour or 
live-bedroom (877)439- 
4038 

ONE BEDROOM WALK to 

j :.iv. Nil .im no dnnk 

ing. no pels (785)539- 
1554 

THREF BEDROOM, ONE 
b.ith house across from 
Modem applian- 
ces, central air, very clean 
Available immediately $350 
per bedroom plua untitles 
1736 Anderson Call KSU 
Foundation al (785)532- 
7589 01(785)532-7541. 



fui Saie- 
Houaes 

lake HOUSE, two stones, 
1,700 square leei Large 
deck and screened porch, 
sand beach, boat ramp. 
great viewi $139,500 
(765)468-3531 



For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

HORSE LOVERS, two-bed- 
room mobile home. Barn 
and Corral, Close lo lown 
(786)537-9718 

-\ 



FEMALE FOR January 
May Two bedroom house, 
close to campus, $275/ 
month plus utilities Washer/ 
dryer Call Megan (785)906- 
0131 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed Available Decern 
ber 15 January to May 
$290/ month Pets allowed 
615 Thurston. Call 

(765)341 1073 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to share two-bed- 
room apartment $260/ 
month, spirt electric and ce 
bio bill Call Megan al 
1402)750-0570 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Three bedroom 
apartment hall block from 
campus $250/ month plus 
:'n Ihird utilities Call 
1/85)342-1554 

IE MALE ROOMMATE No 
smoking Two-bedroom 
apartment Close to cam- 
pus Otl -street parking 
Washer/ dryer Avertable Im- 
rnedialeiy (6201481-9837 

FEMALE ROOMMA1E 

three- bedroom house tor 
spring semester Rent $320 
plus utilities Very nice 
house (316)990 2046 

EEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed Fun. out-go inq ng 
pets Two-bedrooms availa- 
ble $300/ each (913)486 
2745 

ROOMMATF WANTED. 
$350, one- hall utilities, Scott 
(785)341-5153 

SUBLEASER FOR one ot 
tour -bedrooms. University 
i Begins January 
$275 monthly Cable Irash. 
washer/ dryer fun 
(316)650-6563 

WAl K to clas 

no drinking, no pets 

(785)539-1554 

1501 



Sublease 

$365. 

Crossing Cable, wasner/ 
giyei lurnished One bad- 
room open in ! wo bedroom 
apartmenl Plea" 
(913)909 5448 

1 ' VAT ril H r*t) Ded 
room, $550 a month Close 
lo Campus 1913)645-6321 

AGGIEVILLE LOFT Lease 
August 2006 
Four -bedroom Iwo bath- 
room new carpel $350/ 
men ih Moore Property 
Management 1785)537 
0205 

>LMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Walking distance to 
campus Large room $300 
plus one-third utilities Avail- 
able January l Please call 
17851640-3288 

MALE SUBLEASE wanted 
One-bedroom out ol three- 
bedroom hnuse Rem $300/ 
month plus ul 
ble second aai 
•.6686 

NEEDMAlE » leiiisji M 
lease' December $275' 
month plus utilities Close to 
campus (316)644-2118 

ONEBEDROOM APART- 
MENT fail monlh walrjr 
and Irash paid Close lo 
campus Available January 
I (negotiable | Call 

(5731718 7321 or 

ajsJttWamsii nrtu 

ONE BL0ROOM CHASE 
Manhallan Apartmenl s 

available January Call 
( 785)539 8366 Water/ trash 
uaid Pots allowed. 

ONF BEDROOM $395 Ot 
ble- water paid Laundry/ 
pool/ hot tub on site Small 
pels Quint Available now. 
1785)375 3015 

SUBLEAt-tH NtEDED lor 
January 1 Spacious arm- 
bedroom, dose lo campus/ 
Agglev Hie (785)564 7134 

SUBLEASER NEEDED lor 
one room m a ihree -bed- 
room house on 
Lane Available al end ol 
December until end ol July 
Call (913)208-2982 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
Iwo-bedroom apartmenl. 
Chase Manhallan apart- 
ments Will pay January rent 
it signed by December Call 
(785)871-0738, (785)871 
1553 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
One-bedroom apartment 
Available December 12- 
May $490/ month Pels al- 
lowed lor $25/ month Gas 
and water paid Laundry la 
crimes Pool Call (785)341 
1939 

SUBLEASER WANTED, 
Founders Hill, lour-bed- 
room $308 75 a month plus 
bills Very Mm 
(785)317-1875 or (785)317- 
5145 

SUBLEASING A two-bed 
room close to campus For 
more inform anon call 
(620)276-4940 

TWO- BEDROOM APART- 
MENT $400/ monlh al 1026 
Bertrand, upper apartment 
From January through May 
If interested Call (620)719- 
6658 



AGGIEVILLE RET All 
space tor lease Handt-Cor- 
nor Shopping Center Off 
street parking ( 786)539- 
0350. (785)313-2976 




Weight Loss & / 
Nutrition 

I LOST 55 pounds in otghl 
weekst See pictures and 
read my story 

mmJBmm&LiaM gam 




310 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy lha financial potential of 
advertisements in Ihe Em 
ptoyment/Career c las sit! 
cation. Readers are ad 
vised lo approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau. 501 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 
(785)232-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field ol 
work or labor lor which 
he/ she is properly quail 
fled regardless of race 
■ei. military status, disa- 
bility, religion, age, color. 
national origin or anoaa- 
Iry Violations should be 
reported to Ihe Director ol 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)587-2441 

'BARTENDING' $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1 eon ' 



CATTS GYMNASTICS in 
Wamego is needing recrea- 
tional and team coaches 
Starting pay $B0C< . 
depending on espanence 
iilabilily Call Angle 
456-8488 ll interest 
ed 

CHRISTMAS BREAK spe 
' going home lor the 
irn some money 
lun from mid De- 
cember lo Jan 3rd al the C 
Lary U Guest Ran I 
Rockies When work is l>n 
ishad spend a mi 
tree room and board to pur 
sue your lavonte winter actl- 
vlloa in Grand County Coto- 

(970) 867 ;iv 

ilaiyu.cum 






If you are a graphic design major and would like an 
on campus spring 2006 internship for credit, stop by for 
an application Your art department adviser's permission 
is required. Application deadline Is Friday, Nov. 18. 



Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. 
for more information. 




Earn class credit working with the ad design/production staff on 
the Kansas State Collegian during spring semester 2006. Limited 
enrollment, The instructor's permission is required. No prerequisites 
are necessary Stop by 113 Kedzie from 8 a m.-3 p.m for an 
application Application deadline is Friday. Nov. 18. 




310 



Help Wanted 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAY 

GROUND Supervisors 
Hall Monitors needed tor 
the 2005- 2006 school year 
$6 50 pei hour, one and 
one- half- Iwo hours per day 
i hi i 00 p m Apply 
D 38.1 2031 Poynu 
Ave Manhallan, KSfyjoOJ. 
(-85)5872000 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 

OUTBOUND SALES Civ- 
il Pius is the nation's leader 
in producing custom-da 
signed local government 
websites Currently we lire 
I mm] p.irtTime and lull-tune 

telemarkui 

m our sales eti' ir ! Mutt ba 
■ raaVitod ■-"■' '--t.i'H'i Aiiti 
strong oomrtHinicalion skills 
wags plus bonuses 
SI 8/ hour or 
i "Mi' resume lo 
., in Mt- 
ii tormal 
1 . in. i Opportunity I 
»>' 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC 

i stem 



1 and SOL et< 
lulled $14 50/ 

|| ■■ I mail resume in Mi- 

■irosofl Word 

in iQLyj ovicpJus torn 

ROYAL PURPLE YEAR- 
BOOK 

marketing assistant 
design p 'latenat. 

oil sales 
and participate in marketing 
Work on 
■ • 'is K-State s 
firming v - 
Inn hi, . lad im 

i nosey Por 

i?8S)53?6SS7 lor 
more inlarmaliriri 

STL'DENt NEEDING ride 

•rr.asifmally i 
son, KS on weaker! 
share eitpons»s (620)421 
"I0*M 

STUDENT PUB1 (CATIONS 

Macmli sans he- 

■ 

IQ Mac into :■ ' 
providing 

Applicants should 
■ Wt Mac 
OS X > md tls 

■ 

i any ot 

and general troubleshooling 

ind the 
web Mnri 
starts at $7 50 per hour with 
Ktvance 

■ 

■ 

I J or 115 Ked- 

n 

■ . cavteih/ajj 

Nov II 'as* in- 

i 13 n.i'.l^iii 

3301 



4 10 



Items for Sale 

8X10 DOGKENNEL, $45, 
26* ladles bike SI 
lect leather carrying case. 
(able, miscellaneous sup 
plies , $30 or best otter Call 
fi-8901 , evenlngii 

WOMEN OF K State Donl 

N.i, inn. a aaxual iseitaM 
victim Keycham pepper 
sprayers on sale halt prtoe 
Cull | /B5)34 1 5294 or email 
hMffieftgathoilrnaa cam 

4201 



Garage/Yard 
SoiM 



HUGE SALE! SatUi 

vumtier 1'Jth Ham V" 

Colloctables. rumiture. and 
' mtcJ goods 

465 e^aaaa1B1B1B1B«Ba« 

Tickets to 
Buy/Sell 

wen GENFRAI 

mi loot 

NFED ICAT ticket to the MU 




510 



Automobiles 

■ '*eed «" 

'iing dec 1 

Gieal car lot 
.t>r or work vehicle 

S-lGlXi 
1 785)587-9242 lor M 




ECONOMIC DEVELOP 
MENT Coordinator Full 
lime position available in 
Wabaunsee County Salary 
based upon espanei 

Don please contact WCED 

lion deadline postmarked by 
November 21 Please send 
cover letter and resume to 

WCED, PO Bo. 5, Ai. 
68401 ot email to 
IMdeUeVMI MJ 

FULL AND patt-timo help 
needed Please apply >n 
puison Feldkanips Furni- 
ture Man 7977 Eata iimii 
way 24. Manhattan 

GET PAID to drive a brand 

new carl Now payH 
ers $600 $3200 a month 
.i Key to- 
:.i, 
www .treacarkay.com 

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
Consulting a man.i 
company that has been do- 
ing business with Geary 
Community Hospital is an- 
nouncing thai Ihny have a 
position open in lh< 
Health Canter and P. 
Inpatient Rehab lor art As 
stslanl Director The quali- 
fied appkcanl musl tiave a 
miriiitiiim ol a bachelor's de- 
gree In Business and oi 
Marketing with a healthcaie 
background being preterred 
but not required The hours 
are Monday through Friday 
with alternating coll every 
other weekend. Interested 
and quallfad applicant 
should apply in writing to 
Geary Community Hospital , 
All Mel ante Gnffln .Senior 
Health Center, 1102 S( 
Mary's Rd Junction City, KS 
66441 or l»» to (785I?J8 
2*81 or email to 
modWinfft gghjB^rg Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

PROMO HELP needed this 
Saturday 4-6 hours before 
tootball game Pay range 
$15- $17/ hour Contact 
Josh or Vema (314)729- 
1565 



Business 
Opportunities 

The Collegian cannot veri 
ry the financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployments areer classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised lo approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
S01 SE Jefferson, Topeka, 
KS 66607 1190 1785)232 
04S4 



630 



Spring 
Break 

"Ii SPRING rVe.n 

site 1 Low prices guaranteed 

Book 11 peci 

WWW SpnngBieakfli- 
COUIHs -WWlOi- 

surcTours com 



RPRING BREAK 

(800)231 

tfjetfjUdaaja, i. i - -■ - - 

on ' 



Campus 

Phone 
Book 

Buy it 

in Kedzie 103, 

Mort -Ffi 8am -5 p.m 




sudolku 



Fill in ihe gnd so that every row, 

every column, and every 3 x 3 box 

ctmtains the dibits 1 through 9 

with no repeats 





8 


5 4 


9 




5 


4 




7 


8 


6 




3 




4 


4 




7 5 3 




9 


2 




4 6 1 




7 


CO CD 


7 
5 




7 


5 

4 


2 
3 


2 9 




Solution and tips 




I 


\tw 


WW. 


sodoku 


.com 





Bring in |in//1r 
and receive TRKK chips 

and small drink. 

nulli pimflltX "I inn ^i^i' ^lllil 



Deadline* 

iTrtSiital .*li must be 
pUted bj ik«Ki the day 
Uoitwe you wati! yout ad 
IB run, Clraihorj o*Kf)la> 

'-. 
4 p.m iwi wnrVint; days 
pricii in tin* tU\f you 
youi rid in mi 
CAU 532-655S 



ClassidcdRATES 

tDAY 

20 words or less 

$8 50 

eacn word over 20 

20c f»r word 

2 DAYS 

20 word! i" less 

eat - 1 20 

25c pei word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$11 
each word ewer ?0 
mid 

4 DAYS 

20 wofds or less 
! N 
' wi'inl over 20 
35C F»nr word 

5 DAYS 

20 wonJs of less 
|14 

ear 1 20 

40c per word 

. rate) 



TO PLACE AN AD 

Go ; 103 

■ m the 
K-Stal Jnion) 

i are 

Monf Friday 

a am to S p.m. 
,en 
exO' iays. 

HOW TO PAY 

ustbe 

i !■ - unless 

• i count 
Student 

Cash, cnedc, 
Masti -j3 ate 

aocT-i is a 

$10 ijeon 

all' 'chs 

- 



FREE FOUND ADS 
ou, we 

'hiee 

■ 

CORRECTIONS 

II yot i or m 

fliOh 



CANCELLATIONS 

I) y: ' ilem 

before your ad has 

nrptred m wtB refund 

you i. rining 

days Viu must call us 
beli ' day 

be)' - iobe 

putl'; 



HEADLINES 

For ,ii irge, 

we ll put a headline 

above your td lo catch 

the readei $ .ittontton. 



Imllctm 







li..n..i,, l jrK„, 




• TO 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 17,2005 



PIPPIN | flay described as Broadway rock musical I HONOR PLEDGE | Possible cheating investigated 



c\.n tinned from Page 1 

a wonder tni show," Anderson 
said She said the play us being 
1 1 a youiitf man who is m 
h i.t meaning, but looks tor 
it everv where except inside him 
sell 

'It's about searching for 

ling tn life, and I think that 

.m relate to thai whether 

L8 01 60," Anderson said. 

AndLTMin also said the music 

in the play is great, and the story 

Intriguing and comical. 'Tip 

I mi rnwei interesting connec- 

wiih other characters in his 
net that idea in itself can 

I I appreciated by anyone 

Price Mettkk, senior in theater, 
■. ■ ,1 
'It's highly entertaining, and 
he said 
Wingfteld, instruci 
music, is i he music director for 
"Pippin." He described the pro- 
i hi .u .i Broadway rock mu- 

liave about 15 people in 
the orchestra," Wingficld said. 
n two keyboards, lots o f 
n I electric bass. The play 
will be interesting and has great 
and lots or da i , 
Scot! laid the entire cast has 
l long time on the play 
acourage people to come 
becaUM we've been working on 
llm iy much the begin 

oing of the semester," Scott said. 
And) 'id the play is 

never boring, and thai .nullum-. 

will be entertained. 

I love watching it, and 
I've been watching it for eight 




Continued from Page 1 

Web site, the current Honor 
System was approved by Stu- 
dent Senate in 1997 and by the 
faculty in 1998. 

"Our goal is to go one step at 
a time with the investigation,' 
Allen said. "We're going a little 
slow, but we want to make sure 
the facts are known " 

Rapte said he thinks using 
the group to obtain the Word of 
the Day is cheating and should 
carry consequences. 

"(Clark) had words of the 
day to ensure people come to 



class, and people cheated his 
process," Raple said. "They 
broke the rules, They should 
have to complete one of those 
honor classes offered by the 
University" 

Allen said consequences for 
honor code violation have var- 
ied in the past 

"For first -time offenders, an 
XF is a high-level sanction," 
Allen said, "and a warning is 
more low-level," 

In fall 2003, an introduction 
sociology class taught by grad- 
uate leaching assistant Sara 
Fisher was investigated after 



Fisher said students were tak- 
ing in-class quizzes for others 
who did not attend class. 

Students who violated the 
honor code received warnings 
and had to take one of the uni- 
versity's classes on the honor 
code, 

Clark, professor in geoloffl 
asked not to comment but did 
say the anonymity of the stu- 
dents is one of the top priorities 
at the moment, 

"We want to promote in- 
tegrity and honesty in our ua£ 
vereity community,'' Allen said 
"That is our main goal here" 



ARCHITECTURE | College considers change 
to 11 -semester program to offer master's degree 



Christopher Hincwlnckwl | COlLfGIAN 
Pippin, played by junior in applied music Austin Short, rocks out to 
music In the opening part of the musical "PIppln.'Trie musical opens at 
8 tonight at McCain Auditorium 



LICENSE PLATES I Out-of-state plates at risk 



Continued from Page 1 

Other ways could result in 

i i Ljuences, 
tetimes more aecom- 

' i rials put a stolen tag 

on .i vehicle while they commit 
e other crime in that vehicle, 
,i uneone traces a lag it won't 
cons back ta ihem," he said, 

I 'milling said he believes 
there are people who know who 
the suspect 

The kind of people thai 
fUeel signs and lags don't put 



Ihem in a drawer or bOGI they 
put them up on the wall as deco- 
ration,' lit.- said 

Although Doehling knows 
out uf-slak' LSgl are being stolen, 
he said there is not much that 
can be done to prcvenl someone 
from taking them People who 
do have license plates stolen will 
tMed to contact their state's de- 
partment o[ motor vehicles to 
find out about getting replace- 
ment plates. Doehling said 

Those who know anything 
about the stolen plates are en- 




.injeantuscreations.com 



State license plates stolen 

Arizona Mew Mexico 

>nla New for* 

Connecticut North Carolina 

Florida Tews 

luwd Virginia 

Kansas Washington 

Minnesota Wisconsin 
Montana 

co u raged to call Crime Stoppers 
at 539-7777 Calls are anonymous 
and Doehling said there could he 
a reward if tbe suspect is caught. 



KTABUSHED W WAftUSTOW, IL 
IN I9H3 TO ADC TO STUM NTS CM 
ANC QCNEEAL DATING ABILITY 



Continued from Page 1 

degree was because most arc hi 
lecture students work as hard, 
or harder, than students in some 
master's degree programs. 

"Tile ItudentS in our college 
currently lake between 160 and 
170 hours for their bachelor's 
degree. Their degrees are much 
more like a graduate degree 
then an undergraduate degree," 
Omelas said "It will make their 
degree more in line with how 
much work they do ." 

The suggested changes would 
add between si\ and 12 credit 
hours to each major, Ornelus 
said, even though most archi- 
tecture students take up to 40 
hours more than most grattu- 

.ilcs 

"I can't deny that it will be 
more work, because tin 
be taking graduate class, 
it also means that then di 
will be recognized for the work 
that they do," she said. 

If the changes are approved. 
they would not bc-ki; 
until next v car's freshman class, 
Omelas said, although the col- 
lege is looking into giving cur- 
rent students the option to earn 
a master's degree 

Along with the change from a 
baclielurs t0 I master's degree, 
the proposal would add a in, is 
ter's in interior architecture and 
product design major, am 
of science of architecture, and 



"We basically take as many hours when we 
graduate with a bachelor's degree as most 
people do when they graduate with a mas- 
ter's, We might as well get credit for it." 



Daniel Robbtn 

SOPHOMORf IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



an interdisciplinary doctorate 
degree, Sachs said 

I think it's an exciting time, 
that we can begin to look at 
ourselves, look at the quality 
of education ihe students have, 
and the quality of research that 
comes OU] oi the college," Or- 
nelas said, "The lamia and ad- 
ration are pretty excited 
about the possibility 'A these 
degree chart 

Daniel Robbed, MphOfBOK 

in lain, .ture, said 

: thinks the move in .1 

is I good idea. 

We hasieally take as many 

hours when we graduate with a 

bachelor s degree as most peo- 

■ when they graduate with 

a masters Rofiben said. "We 

are doing as much work We 

might as well get credit for it 

Given ihe opportunity Rob- 
ben said he would comic 
ing for a niastu \ degree. 

"It just depends OH tin 
na, like how many more hours 
I'd have io take lo get il." lie 
said. 

Despite the higher recogni- 



tion a master's degree would ot- 
ter, Nick Robinson, a fifth-year 
senior in architecture, said he 
disagrees with the college's de- 
cision 

"I think it's unfortunate A 
tue year program gets you mil 
sooner," Robinson said 'We al- 
ready have to take 160 hours. 
Why should we add another 
year 9 The reason why I came 
here was because it was a five- 
year program. All the other 
schools I looked at were ■ 
years" .Z 

Sachs said that the change) 
lo the curriculum will he$ 
maintain K State's architecture 
program among the top pro- 
grams in the nation 

"I think this was an opportu- 
nity for all ol us to look at our 
curriculum and at least do si 
Fine-tuning, and hopef-illv im- 
prove the quality of education 
we are providing," Sachs said. 
"We hope that we will have bet 
let prepared graduates, and we 
hope that this change will help 
us recruit better and belter stu- 
dents" 



tflWIY lOjf^, 




bowing tor 
hildreiuS** 

Saturday, Nov. iqth 

4-7pm & llaiti'Xam *> The Tri-Delt House 
following the game (lS*4 Laramie) 



Pizza 



_. Gumby's 

AAA 




Look for 

TW-Delts 

selling $5 

tickets on 

campus! 




I 



0K. (0 MY CWE tUtUT WIUTT &OUSMCT UK 
HUH NOT f WHO* EITMEE MY SUBS JUST TAfTt 
* LITTlf SIXTH THAT'S All' I HMUTIL TO 
CAU ff JMMY JOWrt TACT SANDWQtU. ttft 
MY MOM TOiD Mi TO STIC* WITH GOCWWt 

Mi thjniu wH»nvrs i oo is w>jm«it, am 

I MUTT THMUf IITHIi Of IIS KttOWl WHAT IT 
MUM. SO LETT STICK WITH t«m 



KSU Theatre ft Dance and 
thr 1 Department of Musk 
.ent 



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til il ray titty lib sandwiches ire a till ! inches ll 
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here white yea cu ftp it (Mi ntysirry mi jr her*' i 

#1 PEPE V 

Neil apple* stud milked him mi prmnlun! cheest 
garnished with lettuce limit o. init may i (Iwtsime') 

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Mr ilium nre sharer) tent bed. tipped with yemmy 
may* lei i ice. ml taniti (Can't beat this »ni!) 

#3 SORRY CHARLIE 

Calilerim uiby turn mind with celery, omens, and 
out tisty since (Inn tapped with 1II3II1 spreits. 
cucumber lettuce anil lumaio (My tsinl reels') 

#4 TURKEY TOM" 

Irrsh sliced turkey hi cm. lipped with lettuce 
leniti. illilta spreuts ind mayo Itheirrfinil) 

#5 ViTO" 

The srifinil hilun r ,iib with {moi Tilimi. pm«el*n< 
cjpictlj emen. leiiur.c lumite k i teil uity liitun 
tniii[rf lie lidf i ii wiih hit peppers, trust Mt!) 






November 1 7-1 9 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public: $13.50 

God 






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wry pcicedudt') 

1J.8.LT.* 

Ijroi' letluct inwiln I rnlyo 

|T»i inly betlei litis nam* sill ihis nnr rule. 1 ] 



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I StdiPep ,5179/SUS 

> Gum chacelne chip ir utiitil nit in ctekie S I SO 

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liy Sib minus tbe vef{iei »d sauce 

SUM I Kimt cheese 

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SUM 4 turkey bieist 

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Low Carb Lettuce Wrap 

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THE J.J. 

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This smdwith wit invtnttd by 
Jimmy Jehu s btithei Mil). It's hutjc 
e«iigh to teed the fwif tie st at ill 
humans' tpus il {inn tilatni, silted 
smokrtt ham cip'cala teut net! 
tub if y 4 pfoulint. iimmid ml* 
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motricierl wiili tHiiet. may* 
Iftiuce ipmiie. t mi himemadt 
liiliandiessrnf 



9-^d*"- 



GIANT CLUB SANDWICHES 

My tlub sandwiches hue twice the mm ind cheese, tryil 
on my lush billed thick sliced J (run bread ir my lamois 
himemadettenchhteidt 

«*7 GOURMET SMOKED HAM CLUB 

I lull 1/4 piuiid el teal applcweod (irniked bim primlil* 
cheese lettuce mmiiu I reilmiyi 1 (I teil such) 

n BILLY a«e* j 

lint but. hint, ptinuiene, li|in mistatd. littict. 
tiMiti. ft miyt. (Here s tn my old pil lilly wtii 
mirnted this (real combs 1 

«9 ITALIAN NIGMT CLUB 

leal (tnea salami, lialun ci[r<cela imgked ham and 
proialone cheese ill tipped wttk lelttce. tirnaio mien, 
maye. indoit ktmemade lialiaotinaiftittt 
I too hat ta order hn pippers |itt isk'i 

#\0 HUNTER'S CLUB*' 

I lull 174 paund ol tush sliced medium tlti rout heel 
pFevolnne lettuce tamilo £ miye (lirotls"'j 

#11 COUNTRY CLUB 1 

fittb sliced rpikeybfeisiapplewnnd smoked tram, 
privilini anil tins ol leisure lentils and mayo' 
(• *«ry tiidliiiiil. yit always eiceptlirtal elastic') 

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Fresh baked mikey li east, preiplpii t hit se aiacida 
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miyi 1 fit s ihe real deil lilks. and it im t l«en Calilornia l 

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Double prmolnnr real atocido sptead. sliced 
cucumbu, alfalfa tprtuiv. letlucl fltniti. ft miyu 
(liy it a* my 1 (tun whole wheal bread Ihn »e( E ie 
sindwlthtswarldclas'.'i 

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laatl beet turkey breast lettuce lomitn ft (niyi 
iflnmeiicancUttic cetiiinlynatiisfntadby J J bur 
dr'imtety twiattd and line tuned la perlntitn' 

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the KM as eur 01 Soiry Charlie eicept this ine has a 
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cutumher llitltc ft tamili (I [itar.iniee it t HtlMHt) 

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A /^K A N S A S STATE 

» Collegian 



SPECIAL SECTION 

Bill Snyder 
to coach the 
final game 
of hisrarepr 



www kstatccollegian com 



Iriday, November 1 8, 2005 



Sub Exp Date 
Kansas State HWorieal 8 

poh • 

Topeka KS 88801 




Necessary precautions 




Bramlage security 

plans, prepares 

for upcoming season 



By Ben Splctr 

KANSAS STATE COUf GiAN 

Amass of purple clad fans Migrate to 
ward Ihc entrance of Bramlage Coli- 
seum Tickets are ripped, the stubs are 
returned and items are checked at the door 
FOf fans thtM days, lilts is normal. 

More than a month after the suicide of an 
Oklahoma student, K State students can rest 
assured that all tbt «J precautions are 

being taken to prevent and react quickly if a 
similar event occurred during an athletic event 
here 

iim Muller, manager of intercollegiate ath 
letics, said preparations tnr Friday's season- 
opening contest against Georgia Southern 
sound and Bramlage 



ts secure 

"We have emcr 
gency procedures in 
place based on the 
severity and nature 
of the emergency," 
Muller said In flu- 
even, i of a serious 
emergency, public 
address announce- 
ments would be 
made and ushers 
would help to evacu 
ate the buildii 

Muller said the 
Big 12 Conference 
sets the guidelines on 
security measures, 
then allows each 
university to enact 
it* own [i 

Big 12 schools 
meet once a year to 
discuss crowd con- 



The OU 
bombing inci- 
dent was one 
that everyone 
in charge of 
facilities had 
to take notice 
of. It will cause 
us to rethink 
security mea- 
sures for years 
to come." 



Jim Muller 

MANAfiLftOllNTffiCOLLf&lAlf 

mumes 



trol, game day poli- 
cies and discuss present issues, Muller said 
Recommendations then go to the institutions 
which choose whether to adapt new policies. 

Muller said an emphasis this year is making 
fans more aware of sportsmanship Obscene 
gestures. ptoflUM language and throwing ob- 
jects are grounds for immediate dismissal and 
potential termination of visitor rights 

"We typically have good group of students 
and fans who know and understand what out 
tradition is, as well as how to act, even at a 
potentially emotional time," Muller said "We 
want the students to have a great tin c. to up- 
hold the traditions of K State, but to be able to 
do so in a safe and pleasant environment" 

Muller said as a result of the University of 
Oklahoma bombing incident, K State is more 
stringent on carrying out its policies 

The OU bombing incident was one that 

btstmnvtafti] 



Snyder's legacy worth more than football to Manhattan economy 



By Mark Potter 
KANSAS STATE (OltfGIAN 

Coach Bill Snyder is often given 
credit for turning around what was 
arguably the worst college football 
program in the nation. 

When Snyder took over in 1989, 
K-Stale was the only major college 
program with 500 losses 

But after Snyder's arrival, an un- 
usual thing happened: K-State start- 
ed winning football games. 

In 17 years with the Wildcats, 
Snyder's teams have compiled a 138- 
65-1 record, It consecutive bowls 
(1993-2003) and a Big 12 Confer- 
ence Championship in 2003. 

"He's always going to be remem- 



bered as the greatest coach 
Kansas State has ever had 
- probably one of the finest 
football coaches of the last 
generation," President |on 
Wcfald said. 

Less documented than 
Snyder's on field su^ 
however, is his effect on the 
Manhattan community 

Before Snyder arrived in 
Manhattan. K Slate's foot- 
ball facilities were in poor condition, 
and some discussed the possibility of 
ridding the university of football alto- 
gether. 

"Back in 1989, our facilities were 
like Division 111," We (aid said. "We 
had no tradition, and we didn't win 




Snyder 

COACH 



many games Now, we're win- 
ning the Big 12 North and the 
Big 12. and I think people are 
really pleased." 
We f aid said before Snyder's 
tenure, it was relatively easy 
to get a good seat at home 
Haines 

When t came to Kansas 
State in the fall of 1986, no 
matter who it was, if the 
game started at 1 10, people 
could get here at five minutes til 1 00 
and get a seat between the 30 and 50 
yard lines," Wefald said. 

Since then, KSU Stadium has ex- 
panded, ticket sales have grown and 
revenue has increased 

Manhattan Area Chamber of 



Commerce President Lyle Butler said 
Snyder's economic influence has 
reached beyond the university 

When you have 50,000 plus 
people come to your community six, 
seven, eight times a year, the impact 
is just tremendous," Butler said "It's 
part of the reason why we have some 
of the restaurants and stores we have 
today." 

Butler, who has lived in Manhat- 
tan for more than five years, said he 
thinks Snyder has done more for 
economic development than anyone 
in the history of the Manhattan com 
munity. 

"Retailers, hotels and restaurants 

See SNYDER Pag* 1 2 



Student 

found dead 

in home 



By Krltteo Roderick 
KANSAS 5UT( COO t&IAN 

A K-State student died Wednesday at 
his Manhattan hnmc. (."apt Gary Grubbs 
with the Riley County Police Department 
said in a release 

Jonathan M it heal Wood, freshman 
in horticulture wat found at 6 12 am 
Wednesday inside his home after the RCPD 
was notified of an unattended death An 
investigation by detectives and the Riley 
County coroner revealed the probable 
cause of death was suicide by hanging, 
Grubbs said in the release 

University Counseling Services employ- 
ees were notified of Wood's death Tuesday 
moming by the K State Police and have 
been consulting Wood's n nun mates, said 
Heather Reed, .issist.mi dean of student 
life. 

Counseling services arc available for 
students who are distressed by the death of 
Wood 

"John was a member of mir K Stale fam- 
ily and he will he missed,' Reed said "We 
extend our deepest condolences to his fam 
ily ,u id friend- 

A memorial being planned for 

Wood Reed said details will be available 
l-'nday and will be released in Monday's 
( 'illfjiian 

Funeral services are pending and will be 
announced at a later date 

— To contact counseling v*rvl(«, call 5 JKS27, 



SGA rejects 

increase 

for band fund 



By Katty Lyon 

KANiAS MATE (01 Old *N 

U last night's meeting, Student Senate 
announced that the proposal to increase the 
K State band's privilege fee allocation by 15 
percent was defeated, in an 11- 1-0 vote 

The proposition to increase the funding 
was made by ban t director Frank Tracz at 
the Nov. 4 meeting 

"They've had a large increase in past 

years," Matt Wagner, Senate privilege lee 

■ said "The committee felt at some 

point there needs to be accountability from 

other campus entitu 

The band will receive ihe same amount 
of funding for the next three fiscal yeirs as 
they have for the 

Proposed budget 

Salary/Wages: 540,000 00 

Postage: 55,000.00 

Office Supplies; $6,000.00 

Vehicle Maintenance 

55,000.00 

Non Athletic Equipment: 

550,057.00 

Copy Com: 59,000 00 

Team Travel: 520.000 00 

Banquet/ Awards; 

SU.00O.0O 

Total budget: 5146,05700 



past three years, 
which is $146,057 

Compared 
to mher Big 12 
sihicls 0u. K State 
band program re- 
ceive' of the 
largest amounts of 
tunding through 
privilege fees Texas 
A&M and Oklaho 
ma State are the t in i 
other schools in the 
league who allocate 
campus privilege fee funds to support Oieir 
band budgets 

The band received a privilege fee funding 
increase of 22 66 percent in 1998. and the 
funding has increased by 102 percent in the 
past 10 years 

The band currently receives limited ad 
ditional funding from other campus organi 
xations The Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics provides funding for an assistant 
band director, and fundraisers are held 
through an account with the K State Foun- 
dation 

Limited, and not necessarily annual, 
funding can also be provided by the Alumni 
Association and campus president- 

"Other venues than just the students ben- 
efit from the band's services," Wagner said 

Tracz said at last week's meeting that he 
expected no change in funding 



Today 



High 54 

Low 36 



Saturday 



High 55 
Low 10 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Smith convicted 

Joseph Smith, 39, was convicted 
Thursday in Sarasota, Fla, of kidnap- 
ping, raping and strangling 1 1 -year 
old Carl le Brucia. Her hall naked body 
was found several days after a security 
camera captured her kidnapping 
Smith showed no emotion while the 
verdict was read. 

Pay] 



Sales tax 

In a proposal adopted Thursday, 
the Kansas Board of Regents wants 
lawmakers to pass an annual sales tax 
increase of about $40 million for 10 
years and issue 5 1 50 million in bonds 
to pay for 5584 million In mainte- 
nance needed lor buildings on the 
state's six college campuses. 



Sex offender proposal 

Senate leaders offered a proposal call- 
ing for a minimum of 25 years behind 
bars for crimes involving children and 
life imprisonment lot a third convk 
tion Anyone convicted of rape ot 
aggravated criminal sodomy of a child 
under 1 4 would serve at least 25 years 
before being eligible for parole. 



DON'T FORGET 



Klrtoff far Wildcat foot 
ball against Missouri 

kH l 10 pm. Saturday 
at Snyder family Stadium 

Ego Imaging, Mega fll« 
and Freaky Snapshots 
will be from 8 to midnight 
tonight in the K-State 
Student Union Courtyard 



as a pan of Union Program 
Council's After Hou5 

United BladVokes 
Gospel Clteft will perform 
a Harvest Time Concert at 
7 tonight at Mount Zkm 
family Worship Center, 916 
Yuma St 



& 



> 



mmttmmmm 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 




tretrte 
'fining 



1122 Laramie 



Bring this ad in for a 
:•! cany* 
when tanning! 

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merly of 



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1 ( I'/ HKCDZMR, POYCA At; / D 

S / RIMCSSK2 M J Q K / M R ? 
Yesterday's rnptoquip: BECAUSE I HAVE NO 

DKIiAU OF (iKAIN-VJUNCHINd BEETLES, YDl 
MIGHT Will SAi I FEAR NO WEEVIL., 
today** Cryptoquip Que: N equal* I 



BEST BETS 

Your guide to the weekend's entertainment 



1 1 Fill the 'Bill' 

football coach Bill Snyder will oversee the final game of his career 
at 1:10 p.m. Saturday at Wagner field The Wildcats will (ace off 
against the Missouri Tigers foi the last game of the season Snyder 
will be honored when the stadium will be renamed to Bill Snydet 
Family Stadium. Saturday'* game will also mark the final appear- 
ances of 17 senior players For more information, call J 800-221 - 
2287 or visit www.bfflffsporfi.rom 



2 1 K State vs. Georgia Southern 

The K State men's basketball season opener against Georgia 
Southern is at 7 tonight at Bramlage Coliseum kicking off the 
Wildcat Weekend sporting events. Fans can show their football 
ticket and get into the basketball game (or $10 general admis- 
sion. The Wildcats have a 2 preseason record and have extend- 
ed their exhibition winning streak to five games with a 79-75 
win over Emporia State on Nov. II. For more information, call 
1 -800-221-2287 or visit www.fafflfesporfs.com. 





J | K-State vs. Detroit 

The K-State women's basketball season gets 
underway when the Wildcats play the Detroit 
Titans at 2 p.m. Sunday at Bramlage Coliseum. Fans 
who present their ticket stub from the football game or 
men's basketball game wilt be admitted for SI. The game will be 
broadcast on the K-State Sports Network For more information, 
call 1-800-221-228? or visit www.faMesfwm.rom 



4 1 Pippin 

The Broadway musical "Pippin" will 
be performed by the KSU Theatre at 
8 p.m. tonight, Saturday and Sunday 
at McCain Auditorium It is the story 
of a young man who sets out to dis- 
cover the true meaning of his life and 
tuns Into war, sex and politics before 
discovering love Cost is $11.50 fot 
the general public, $ 1 1 .50 for seniors 
and $9.50 for students, for more in- 
formation, call SJ2-6857 or e-mail 
mafkoimiipikiu.edu 




The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly horn Riley County Police Depart- 
ment's daily logs. The Collegian does not list wheel lock* or 
minor traffic violations because of space constraints 

Wednesday, Nov. 16 

■ Andrew Sender, 406 Osage St., was arrested at 10 a.m. for 
extradition of imprisonment Bond was not set. 

■ Joseph Agnew Jr., 1 300 Ady Drive, was arrested at 1.20 
a.m. for Driving with a suspended license Bond was set at 
$500. 

■ Harold Heilman, 2500 Farm Bureau Road, was arrested at 
1:30 p.m for failure to appear. Bond was not set. 

■ Zadwy Fdmond, Junction City, was arrested at 325 p.m. 
for obstruction of legal process and probation violation. 
Bond was not set. 

■ Zachary Gipson, 1420 Watson Place, was arrested at 615 
p.m. for four counts of theft and one count of criminal dam- 
age. Bond was set at $3,000 

■ Hung Tran, 1420 Watson Place, was arrested at 8:20 p.m. 
for three counts of theft and one count of burglary. Bond 
was set at $3,000 

■ Holly Wolf, 908 Oaflin Road, was arrested at 9:1 5 p m for 
two counts of failure to appear. Bond was set at $2,000. 

■ Russell Allen Jr , 708 Allison Ave , was arrested at 10 p.m. 
for failure to appear. Bond was set at $157. 

■ trie Drth, 1420 Watson Place, Apt. 15, was arrested 



at 10:15 p.m, fot possession ofa simulated controlled 
substance, unlawful possession of drugs and paraphernalia, 
unlawful sale of drugs and paraphernalia and evidence of 
drug taxation. Bond was set at $5,000. 

Thursday, Nov. 17 



■ Jay Brothers. Hutchinson, Kan., was arrested at 12:35 am 
for disorderly conduct Bund was set a] $750 

■ Jonathan Altvater, 2452 Himes Road, was arrested at 
12 50 am fot obstruction of legal process, disorderly 
conduct, purchase and consumption of alcohol and transpor- 
tation of an open container Bund was set at $ 1,500 

■ Adam Suhler, 3312 Ktnsmgton Court, Apt 10, was ar- 
rested at 2: 15 a m. for dlsoiderly conduct Bond was set at 
$750 

■ Kahlyn Cain, Topeka, was arrested at 2:39 a.m. for driving 
with a suspended license Bond was set at $ 1 ,500 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas State University, is published by Stu- 
dent Publication 1 - ln< . Mzie 103. Manhattan, KS 66506 
The Collegian is published weekdays during the school 
year and on Wednesdays during the summer Periodical 
postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502. POSTMASTER 
Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, circula 
tion desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 7167 
© Kansas Slate Collegian, 7005 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



Campus Calendar is the Colle 
qians campus bulletin board 
service Items in the calendar 
can be published up to three 
times Items might not appear 
because of space constraints 
but are guaranteed to appeal 
on the day of the activity. To 
place an item in the Campus 
Calendar, stop by Ked/ie 116 
and fill out a form ot e-mail the 
news editor at colkgicnmpub 
fau.etfubyn a.m. two days 
before it is to run 

■ The Graduate School an- 
nounces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral diwr 



of Juvenal Higiro at 8:30 a.m. 
today in Call 206. 

■ The Graduate School an- 
nounces the final oral defense 
•if the doctoral dissertation of 
Danielle Padilla at 9 am. today 
in the Prod ice Management 
Center in Trotter Hall. 

■ The KSU Marching Band 
will perform at S p m. Sunday 
at Ahearn field House 

■ Kipper's Cradle will play 
dfJpm Saturday at PJ.'s Bar, 
11J9Ufdmte$t 

■ Workers of Wisdom will 
meet at 7 p.m Saturday in the 
Union little Theatre for praise, 
power and prayer revival 



Corrections and clarifications 

Collections and clarifications appear in this space. If you see some 
thing that should be corrected, call news editor Krlsten Roderick at 
532-6556 ore mail wlltgmwpub.kutdu. 



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Page J 



Appleby to go to trial 
in July for Kemp murder 

Sentencing portion may take longer than verdict 



By Christina Hansen 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Benjamin Appleby's ease is 
scheduled lei gu to trial in July, 
although it is unclear whether 
prosecutors will pursue the 
death penalty. 

Appleby, 29, was charged 
with ftrst-de- 

Bgree murder 



Kemp 



mi connection 
with 19-year- 
old former 
K-Slate stu- 
dent Ali 
Kemp's 

death 

In a (aped 
confession, he 
told police he 
beat, Strangled and attempted 
to rape Kemp after she resisted 
his initial advances. 

ROJ Burnett, sociology, an- 
thropology and social work 
instructor, said the sentenc- 
ing portion of the trial may be 
more drawn out than finding a 
verdict 

"Determining guilt or Inno 
CflftCfl may be a relatively short 
process, hut sentencing could 
lake much longer if it becomes 
B death penally case " 

In June 2002, Kemp was 



working as a swimming pool 
attendant in her hometown 
of Leawood, Kan, when a 
strange man brutally attacked 
and killed her in a nearby 
pump house 

Kemp's case remained un- 
solved until Connecticut po- 
lice Appleby in November 
2004 

Several tips led police to 
the Conner Leawood family 
man and business owner, who 
was living in Connecticut un- 
der an alias 

The tips came in response 
to an unusual notice posted by 
Kemp's family 

As part of an exhaustive 
search to find the man 
murdered his daughter, Roger 
Kemp DOSted the Leawooil 
pohec department's composite 
sketch of her killer on a high- 
way billboard 

"I was going down the 
highway and I looked at (the 
billboards) and I thought, why 
not?" Roger Kemp said on the 
Oct, 28 edition rj| "2t 
which featured the Kemps 
search 

"Why not give them a 
and see what u billboard costs'' 
And that's what I did." 

He didn't slop with (he bill- 



boards 

Kemp took out ads in USA 
Today, publicized his daugh- 
ter's case on the nationally 
syndicated television show 
"America's Most Wanted" and 
helped set up a $50,000 reward 
fund for information about the 
killer 

The Kansas City Crime 

( ommission received more 

than 3,000 tips concerning 

ISC, two of which led to 

Appleby's arrest 

Bametl said the Kemps' 
publicized search reflects a 
growing I rend among victims' 
families 

With the growth of Inter- 
net news sites and cable news 

networks, people with the 

means are able lo keep cases 
in the public eye," he said 

"They keep ii out there so 
thai people don' I forget The 
publicity gets leads, and puts 
pressure on the police," 

Bametl compared the 

Kemp's case to Ihc recent me 

dia coverage of Alabama teen 

lee Holloway's disap- 

tice during a senior trip 

to Aruba 

Appleb\ s preliminary hear- 
ing lor the murder of Kemp 
was in September 2005 



Fort Riley soldier retracts statement 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANVAVSMTKOIIIfilAN 

A Fort Riley soldier con 
victed of murder has recanted 
an earlier statement which 

implicated his platoon leader, 
the Associated Press reported 

Thursday 

pvt Michael Williams made 
earlier claims that 2nd Ll Er 
ick Anderson had given an or 
shool in Iraqi man in 
August 2l)l).l 

Williams has now admitted 
the Statement is false and he 
made the claim to shorten his 
sentence, according to the AP 
story 



>rdmg to I Tort Riley 
press release, Anderson is un- 
dergoing | hearing und< 
tide 32 of the Uniform 1 1 
Military lustier 

Tlie purpose ol lh( hearing 
Is to determine if he will pro- 
ceed to court-martial, and is 
compared in the press > 
lo civilian pn and 

Grand Jury hearings, which an 
inapplicable to military person- 
nel 

Anderson is lacing charg- 
es tor conspiracy to commit 
murder, two sp ms of 

murder, dereliction of duty, 

false official statement and two 

specifications ol conduct un- 



becoming an officer, the press 

release said 

Both Williams and Ander- 
son are part of the 1st Bat- 
talion, 41sl Infantry Brigade 
which is located at Fori Riley, 
and the alleged incident oc- 
curred while the unit was per 
forming operations near Sadr 
nling In the AP 

Lt.Col Arthur Degroat, pro 

lessor ol militat I said 

the presence of a trial indicates 
accountability and responsibil- 
ity possible wrongdoini 

However, Degroat s,nd the 

K State Army ROTC pn 
WAS not putting any special em- 
phasis on the proceedings. 



KFC sales decrease in China 
due to recent avian flu scare 



By Annstte Lawless 
KANSAS STATE COLUCIAN 

Due to a heavy outbreak of 
avian influenza in China, some 
consumers arc too chicken to 
eat chicken. 

Corporate Kentucky Fried 
Chicken officials said last week 
that the company plans to 
launch an advertising campaign 
to ease consumer fears of a pn 
tential outbreak of the flu in the 
United States 

1 Imugh district KFC of- 
ficials denied any connection 
between the avian flu outbreak 
and sales, National Chicken 
Council spokesman Richard 
Lobb commended KFC s wis. 
and prudent" decision 

He said while the chance 
of an outbreak in the United 
States is slim, an effective id 
vertising campaign will advise 
consumers not to worry about 
eating at the national chain 

Manhattan resident Brad 
Dyer said he often consul 
chicken, including chicken 
from the local Kentucky 1 
Chicken restaurant, 901 N 3rd 
St 

He said the "rumor mill oui 
break" bothers him more than 



avian flu outbreaks 

"I don't understand all the 
muss and fuss over the chicken 
scare. Dyer said People are 
just paranoid, thinking they are 
going to get some wild interna 
tional disease, but officials de- 
nied the connection Plain and 
simple, nothing is likely to hap 
pen" 

Vccording to Lbs Centers 
lor Disease Control and Pre 
vention. more than 100 human 
i ISeS of the avian fin h 
reported since I 997 

Most major outbreaks have 
occurred in Asia this past u 

with Vietnam reporting its 
42nd human case of the virus 

last week 

The virus is difficult lor hu 
mans lo catch and the CDC 
reported that mosi deaths are 

linked to human handling of 

Infected poultrj 

Kentucky tried Chicken 

restaurants in China reported 

I Wi percent decline in growth 

compared to October -2004 

levels Recently, <<thct chicken 
merchants in China are expert 
encing a similar ss ilion, 

said David Novak chairman 
and CEO of Yum Inc 

Kl i a parent come 



Most o( ihc Chinese sale de- 
cline- in fear. Novak 
said 

Ui rtaven'1 had anyone 

EOnte BRd mention a I mucin 
lo ui locally." Dan Nichols. 
Kansas Missonu KFC District 

Manager 

i.n as I know .ionies 

tically, we're just following 
t si>\ guidelines KFC has re- 
ally stringent pro< esses on how 
,iok our chicken " 
KFC announced s ^ percent 
increase In sales compi 
to la riving limited 

domestic cont i "is about the 

the virus 
The strict national guide 

hues, along with positive adver 

vcliat is keeping 
KFC afool in the L nited States, 
Miller, Prudential 
I qulty i ■ 

in an Assoi latcd Pn ss report 
Miller laid KFCs b 

threat with ' Hu out- 

break was not W it 

II but with media specula 

lion on food i ition. 

tie idtm 

flu Situation continue lo weigh 

on overall i onsumcr sentiment 
ii in China," Mill 

nd 



Jurors convict mechanic of killing girl 



By Mike Schneider 

M ASsociAWi MUSS 

SARASOTA, Fla - Hie 
grainy images captured by a 
ear wash's security, camera 
were chilling a burly, laltooed 
man in a mechanics uniform 
grabs the wrist of an 1 1-year 
old girl walking home from a 
friend's house and leads her 
away 

Carlie Brucias half -i 
body turned up several days 
later outside a church, 

Jurors concluded Thursday 
that a former mechanic was 
the man in ihose images w hu h 
were broadcast nationwide 
during the search for Carlie's 
killer After deliberating ttvt 
hours, they convicted [useph 
Smith, 39, of kidnapping, rap- 
ing and strangling the girl 

Prosecutors built their 



on the footage the lestimonj 

of Smith's friends and I 

crs who said tlicv recogn 
Smith in the video DK \ and 
ban analysis evidence, and the 
word of the di I - broth 

cr who said Smith confessed. 

Smith, who did not take 
the stand showed no emotion 
when the verdict was t 

I he jury will return lor the 
sentencing phase on N 

Carlie's mother, Susan 
Sctiorpen wept -olll\ uritl 

head bowed when the vcrdil'l 
was read, and the girl s father, 
|oe Brucia, nodded when 
of the three ciuivk turns was 
announced 

\ he left coin i 
only thai he was happy with 
the verdict 

"1 can never hold 
Where's the clostl hor 

pen said outside the court 



house one ol I he 

most i"' i thi 

disgu mini 

U Ii, -.ulis- 

fiecl ■ 

, hi • d 

When 

introdu! ; -ind 

stat< ' Ift n 

on pi i 

i the 
I en- 
tail i liled 

to p 

But 
him m [ail say inn 
not Ii, 

Be To re 

Smith ii.ni 

i 



A 



Agape Family Church 



121 S. 4th -i».»« »n 



nlka* „i Mi 






Sumb) >»;.Mia.in. StlvxJnflheBlWc 

i in. Mi in ! A i sup 
Stmda) T:fltl p.m. Ewn i 
Hfafetfuh) 7 Ml p.m. H.wrnl I'nuri 
Ynilltl I lliklun » .111.1 Mui ■ ' 
Ml kl l\(, III IM,I\S I'VSIIIK 
.lis Uti Sum- _'ii> 

Mondfl) Niw I ue N:.Mip.m. 

( ul In ,'i I etluw ^lm> 



(785)539-3570 



Faith Evangelical Free Church 

• Worship at 8:00,10:30, 

10:40, 12:00 

• Sunday School at 9: 15 



1921 BJrnesRd 

776-2056 




AH Welcome to Worship! 

Sunday lvtnmg-7p.m Ganforth Chapel 

New an Thursday Oct. 20 

6p.m. Meat Si Dialog at I uther House 

1T4S Anderson 

KM- 

Nov. S-Walk Konia Trails 



ttiAII t 

313-3895 




IUI HI-RAN 

C'AMI'US 
MINISIIO 



First Presbyterian 

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaChtlTCh 



9: 15 i.m, Wonhlp Service 

9; 15 i.m. Sunday School 

10:30 itn, Worship Service 

5:00 p.m. Contemporary Service 

ft:00 p.m. Dinner for College Students 



Rev, Anne Scheiber, Asaoc Pastor 

Rev. R.C. McConnel), Put or 
801 Leavenworth • 537-0318 



un».li[sinii'SMiaiihallun,e<nii 



i fflS M W JI 



Come Worship 
With Us 

1st Church of the rVazarene 
Ave. 

9.3U 
10:40 Si 

WX> MB* 



CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP SERVICE 

For Everyone i All ages and all people who want to 

worship God. Sundays at S p m. 



((.rlrhhtlinu 
* Vifrif/v 



/ 



SBV& Fellowship Meal at 6 tor College Students 



first PrcsbtfmM Church 

HOI bMWMMNfll 
Mmih.iltuit KS S6S9J 

131 1)518 
Pastoi K i ' \U i minrll 
Aisoiiaii' Tasini AaatSchtibei 

Fiiaili tUitlwnrvlgitnituuiliattnn rom 
MWW.flntpmnHinhMfftn i on I 



33 



'Sinn '" thrtonl 

ionj 

Oil f.itttt ' 



Journey 

Ministry 



i ,.-, i >i u , , f. 

JSOOCIallin • lit, SilW 
•' feci} Hul) 
1 1% Conl«mpOUfy Strmcf 
II 00 9<*dkldM JMrt Blblr 



W estvkw ("ominunih (."hurch 

Worship services 9:00 a.m. 

1 0:45 a.m. 
Sunday school 9:00 o.m. 



r 




i Buthhemet - tyhuch#|uno com 



3001 Fort Riley Boulevard 

www westviewcommunity.com 
785-537-7173 



St. Francis 

Kplsropid 



Campus Ministry 



ii Sute Univeiiity 



Sunday wnrs.ri>fi >ti 
m Paul i Episcopal ( hurch 

\i*m ti Pnynt/ MantiritUn 

1 1 ;n« ,i mi C<mlrniporar> Sen l< f 
i mi j i hu K5t ' Btmlrnta) 



S( fti«KH^CsirrJ«tkury Houit 
ItUiflftlM 



i*w \ id ]'tisj£t.hii i .'tn-ir0nuiU>r M\\ 'Mll\ 



JOIN THE 
DIRECTORY 

Call 532-6560 



Unitarian* ( 

UnlversaJist -JW 
Fellowship - 
of Manhattan 



(^ 



4KI /janilulr KiikI iSiiuIFi imK 

■ '■■ I m RdlfKHI« 

'i Kiiill< 

Iid> L.r 

\ MMeonunj 

I ili-nii.ilMi 

Rr* Hldud NeSm 




^¥ 



CrossRtkids : - : 



^'■' i 

■ 



Sorwlays 5:JUpm 

Widnes*lays S:ll()pm 

1 In iptS 

Explore • Discover • Belong * Serve 



First United Methodist Church 

Worship at X:30, 11:45 and 1 1:0(1 



I «OK It I: *• ami 1 1 :M fiw mult u a^MHwal norvktp 
with rbMri an it nigan I* h»i br*«(tlnl nnflm- 1 

i ..m. «| H 4* lui a HI IMIIII win.hnj tt, »nr 
audtlnrtam t > , < .I«mx»iiI> **> mtnalirv tanj 
(,tr>i Ixad * l)M» VSVIH \UV 

i oMr al » 4* Fm Vuailat VkiwJ in tkf a»lt»iii lam 
V tprftal rbti for rattrer tladraK r Hal in; ihr artiir in 

till N lllr 




it V) i t\\\. 



fell Potnd, Mjnhaltan Kinui 
CAMPU% MINlfTRT' Check out 

Ihr ».hlllr Kiu ((til umtni 



i 



St. Luke's 

Lutheran 

Church 

yM) Sum! v* mut 

S.I I ill, I ill 

1 1. ill 1 1 ii >n.i I \\,irihipb;MI |i,ne 
Sunduv 

,il Worship H:Mi ^ in 

L'olle;.'. B I- .I.m, 

1 1 nil ,i m 
l.muil: illukt v" ninlltilK.eom 

(785>SJ9>2MM 



Hethet .Ifrican ShthadUt 
I piHopal Chunb 




"l.nier it HanAl 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 
Friday 12:10 i 
Saturday 5 [> 
Sunday 9:30 a.m., 1 1 a 
Sun 430 pm,6 p m 
Father Keith V* 

711 Denison 539-7496 



Grace 
Baptist 

riuiivh 






♦ ShihLis Worship ♦ 
8:15 & 10:45 am 

776-04 

www.jjracebchun Ii 



1 



You are welcome at 



For College Students 

\ hi In Is Jllliw^lirp 

« v « aim h 

Wednesday 8:00 p.m (KSU Little Theater) 
Pastor Bryan Blhotf 



Sunday Services 

Sunday School 9:00 a.m. 

Morning Worship 10 15 a rn 
Evening Worship 6 00 p.m. 

\kr\m rr«tu4r4)«i til \ftiien 



Rev. Todd Weston, Pastor 

3310 Candlewood Dr. Manhattan, KS 66503 

(765) 537-7633 www.manhattanag.org 




Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Fans should 

respect 

Snyder's legacy 

Bill Snyder never wanted a big, emo 
tional news conference to draw the 
curtain on his career. 

Even now, he prefers to remain 
unassuming. He was always one to 
toil quietly in his of- 
fice in the corner of 
the Vanier Football 
Complex, rather than 
stand in the spotlight. 

It is that demeanor 
that endeared him to 
countless K-State fans 
over the years. 

Snyder's disposition 
and tenacious work 
ethic are what made 
him the architect of 
the single greatest 
turnaround in the his 
tory of college foot- 
ball - the Miracle in 
Manhattan, as some have called it. 

A program that was once dubbed 
"Futility U" by Sports Illustrated and 
a university that was merely a dot on 
a map suddenly became a destination. 
K State became synonymous with ex- 
cellence. 

The values of faith, leadership and 
determination that Snyder has instilled 
in a generation of student-athletes 
have spilled over into those not affili- 
ated with K-State football. 
His impact has been that far-reaching. 

When Saturday's game comes to 
an end, respect the stadium that now 
bears his name, Stand and applaud 
Snyder, wherever you are, with the all 
respect that he deserves, Drink in a 
moment that you will remember for- 
ever. 



To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ash ford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Girard 
Matt Gorney 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoza 
Alex Peak 
Catrina Rawson 
Kristen Roderick 
Oave Skretta 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e-mail to tettm$ipub kw.edu, or in person to 
Kedzie 1 16 Please include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



/^K A N S A S S I A 1 t 

Collegian 



Matthaw Girard 
(DIIOtlrifNKI 


Johanna Oarnal 
M* HM. lift fDI Nil 


Krlttan Roderick 
Kfjt] EDITOR 


Man Corn*y 

COPUHIH 


Catrina Raman 
PHOTO EDirOfl 


MkhMl Aihlord 

SPORTS (Dl TOK 


Annan* I Awlr 1 1 

ciTYftOvtDime 


Abby Brownback 
UMNSMN 


AknpMk 
THf F04I [OITO* 


Jorm Hogg 

OPINION 10IM» 


Anthony Mondota 

MHSHHtflWHMIM 


Curtli John wn 

UNI INE IDItOK 


D*vt Skf *n« 
MMMUMOI 


Brad Simmon i 
MMH 


Andy Walt .. 

»ssi aomanamn 




CONTACT US 





Kansas State Collegian Classified ads 532 6555 

KediieHH Newsroom SJ2-6S56 

Manhattan, KS 66102 newi&pub.kiu.edu 

Display ads 532-6560 Delivetypfoblems 532-6555 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



ICOUEUAN 



Women want 
to be romanced 



It was a couple of Mondays ago when it first 
happened to me I was walking down Claflin Road, 
minding my own business, hands in my pockets 
and a smile on my lips I was enjoying yet another 
gorgeous fall day in Manhattan as I made my way 
lo ray Rod class. 

Upon admiring the foliage on the other side of 
ilif street, I happened lo make eye contact with a 
boy dressed in red 

Being in the good mood that I was, I flashed 
this boy my best Crest-kid smile and was just about 
to let my eyes wander back to the fall scenery 
when he opened his mouth and a song floated out. 

His melodic words came together in mid air and 
formed a song about a girl At that moment I was 
in a state of confusion which soon turned to shock 
when I realized this boy was singing to me 1 think 



my jaw actually dropped. 
The boy and 1 happened to be walking in dif- 
ferent directions on Claflin so 
the moment was quickly over, 
but the overwhelming feeling 
stayed with trie all day. 

Now let me clarity be- 
fore anyone jumps to con- 
clusions No, just because 
this boy serenaded me doesn't 
mean that t want to date him. It 
doesn't mean that he is now a love 
interest and it doesn't even mean 
that I plan lo try and look him up on 
Faccbookcom 
It's not about thai at all. It was about a 
man, with no hidden agenda, no sneaky 
intentions, being capable of making my day 
without any real effort It was about the thrill of 
the surprise It was about being in a good mood 
and having someone boost it to a 
stellar mood. 

I had no idea that a man would 
sing to me on the street that day. 
or any day for that matter It was a 
nice gesture, a voice like an angel's 
that kept a smile on my face for 
the rest of the day 

Men, just imagine, if a song on 
the street could put a girl on cloud 
nine, think of what a surprise pic- 
nic in the park could do Imagine 
the feelings of happiness and joy 
you could make erupt in a woman just by making 
kind gestures. 

Now I'm not saying the men of K State aren't 
making an effort to woo the women But 1 am say- 
ing the anecdote I'm sharing with you is a prime 
example of the simplicity behind making a woman 
melt. 

Women like to be romanced, it's true. And men, 
you don't have to be romantically interested in a 
woman to romance her. No, I'm talking about tak 
ing your best female friend out for a night on the 
town, simply to make her feel special. 

All this isn't about daring or falling in love, it's 
about men using their power of making girls weak 
in the knees just to brighten a day. It's about mak 
ing a girl feel on top of the world without making 
her feel that a possible relationship is about to 
deploy It's about a man using his talents (singing, 
cooking, dancing, whatever) to make a girl giddy. 
no strings attached. 

If you have that ability, what's the harm in using 




ALYSSA 

ALEXANDER 



Alyiia Ataundtr » * fmhnwfi in print joumaJiwn Pleas* s*r»d your 



Girlfriends provide compassion, grace 




One of my best friends and I 
love going to the movies and stock- 
ing up on junk food. We love stroll- 
ing the Plaza in 
Kansas City, Mo.; 
we don't even 
need to have any 
money. We always 
call when some- 
thing happens, 
good or had 
Another friend of 
mine and I love 
to sit out on the 
front stoop with a 
- beer on nice days 
We love to play in the snow, and 
we can always pick out clothes for 
each other 

Surprisingly, both of these 
friends are guys And while these 
friendships are irreplaceable and 
priceless to me, 1 have learned that 
in certain situations, even these 
guys arc no replacement for a good 
girl friend 

1 have wondered what it is 
about the relationships between girl 
friends that makes them so power- 
ful To me, they can turn a boring 
Sunday afternoon into one of your 
best memories with just a trip to 
the mall, or make you see that you 
will survive when your heart is 
broken 

Just the other day, I was watch- 
ing an episode of "Sex and the 
City" - 1 realize it is not the most 
reliable source for information 
- but the women's friendship is a 
stream of truth that runs through- 



out the set 

When Carrie learns that her 
ex is marrying Natasha, she is 
devastated, but after she discusses 
her devastation with her friends. 
Samantha adds at the end, "What 
kind of name is Natasha anyway?" 
tt may seem like nothing but a 
nasty comment, but what Saman- 
tha really meant is that she is on 
Carrie's side, and that whoever 
hurts Carrie is no friend of Saman 
lli.i's. 

A cliche example from an ele- 
ment of pop culture, maybe, but 
what it says about women's loyalty 
to their best friends is powerful 

Recently, I have experienced the 
meaning of a true girls' night out. 
There is plenty of fun lo be had in 
a night of exchanging glances with 
the guy behind the bar, but there is 
genuine healing power in a night 
sans testosterone. 

Last Saturday, I spent the night 
sharing laughs, drinks and the 
dance floor with three great friends 
This has been one of my most over- 
whelming semesters, and I've found 
myself unfocused and dragging my 
feet 

But this week, I've been infi- 
nitely more organized and self-dis- 
ciplined, and even landed myself a 
new job. Some may say it's just a 
coincidence, but I'll always be- 
lieve that the cure for just about 
anything, including my apathy, is 
a few hours with the girls There is 
something strengthening in being 
reminded that there will always be 



someone there for you 

I'll be the first to say guys can 
make great friends They're grc.ii di 
making us laugh, scaring away the 
creepy guy who's eyeing us in the 
bar and for a playing our favorite 
song on the guitar. 

It is OK 
that their 



faces tum white and they have no 
words when they see tears welling 
in our eyes, or that they have no 
understanding of our beauty rituals, 
because that is what our girls are 
for. So thanks girls, I love you 



Addi* Laut h i junior in matt communications. 
Pm>*w itni pour comments to opinhavtipub. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 




The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's 
anonymous call in system. The Fourum Is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 
and libelous comments. The comments are 
not the opinion of the Collegian nor ate 
they endorsed by the editorial stiff. 

Ta al the people who whine about the 
Collegian, what do you do in your local 
newspaper when mere is no Fourum? Then 
what do you whine about > Oh, I know, 
(hen you become politicians 



eagle was d * wtog down on But- 



ters In front of Anderson on Wednesday. It s 

the circle of life 

Phil Bennett Is no 'no name' If you 

knew anything about K- State football, 
you'd know he used to be one of Snyder's 
best assistants 

So,S*gtp'jco«*bi*obaWythebfst 
cook ever. Yesterday she took a match and 
a fork and made a chocolate cake out of it 

Solid) for coach. Seriously, how funny 
would It be if we ganked Nebraska's old 



head coach' 

That's right, H weren't for the soldiers 
who are giving their lives for you, then 
you wouldn't have the right to bitch. So be 
thankful, not critical 

If I were a shark, I would try not to bite 
my tongue! 

I wish the story about George Rush 

and the Supreme Court were true. That 
would be awesome. I love W 



Hey, everyone. Check out hockersmith. 
net for the Bill Snyder tribute. 

Kody Cooper, no ones holding a knife 
to your throat and making you celebrate 
Thanksgiving, you fatso If you don't want 
to eat turkey, then don't, lust shut up. 

lath tdtets, goeel m Iwm. I don't blame 
the soldiers, but I still wish someone would 
assassinate a bad president for once. 

Lola Shrimplln, you're right. God made 
everyone unique and gave them the 



freedom of choice. 

Tearing down goalposts is Bush league 
It Is something that shoddy programs like 
KU do In the rare event of a win . tt would 
be a disgrace to coach Snyder and all that 
he's achieved. 



Everyone needs to check out / 

com/i>84yy It is a tribute to Snyder, try not 
to cry. 

Chuck N orris was the fourth wise man 
He brought baby Jesus the gift of 'beard' 



Jesus wore It proudly to firs dying day. The 
other wisemen, jealous of Jesus' obvious 
gift favoritism, used their combined 
influence to have Chuck omitted from the 
Bible. Shortly after, all three died from 
roundhouse kicks to the face, 

I hate It when people talk about the 
Fourum In the Fourum That's so lame 



Need men Fourum? f - 't irmi trtmu, 
iforththiltvfftiMi. 



1 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pag 



LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR 



Marching band deserves SGA funding 



Editor, 

I'm a member of "The Pride 
Of Wildcat Land," K-State 
Marching Band, but I am also 
I member of the student body 
it is somewhat obvious thai I 
have a certain bias toward the 
band, but still I believe if 1 were 
not in the band my opinion 
would not be different 

I've been informed that re- 
cent focus groups have voiced 
an opinion which has been 
perceived to be in line with the 
majority opinion of the student 
body - that students prefer to 
hear music and commercials 
over the Jumbolron than tin- 
marching band's playing 

I find this awfully hard to 
believe, considering that every 
time 1 wear a K-State Band 
shirt, people slop to tell me 



how much they love the band 
and how we re duing the most 
amazing shows they've seen 
from the band in years 

Recently, SGA announced 
its plans to reduce funding for 
the band, if not do 8WVJI with 
funding all together 

Hits would be a devastat- 
ing blow to the band program 
and if I may say sn tin- entire 
atmosphere of K-State football 
as we know it. 

Before the KU game this 
year, there was an article in a 
I aw rence newspaper thai read 
"During the football practice 
Kansas conducted Wednes- 
day in Memorial Stadium, the 
Wabash Cannon ball blared at 
times on the loudspeaker 
device used to get the fayh&Wkl 
accustomed to the next atmo- 
sphere they'll face on the road ." 



They weren't blaring the 
"Hey Song." nor were they pre 
paring to near the liMB Bank 
Trivia" They were worried 
about making sure they could 
handle the atmosphere caused 
by the band 

We work hard to do what 
we do, and take ^reat pride m 
what we accomplish I would 
In- no less than offended to tee 
my hard work attd dedication 
he pushed aside to make room 
for rock music and truck com 
tnerciab 

I hope SGA would recon- 
sider, because without "pride.' 
what do we h;t 



Matthtw Card* 

WM0M0KI INHOTU RhlWktNl WAMfjfMSM 
AHOSMtOPHONt 



Collegian wrong for not informing 
community of Veteran's Day meaning 



Diversity showcases differences, 
not meant to mean cultural equality 



Editor, 

diversity - noun 

1, the quality or condition 
of being diverse; complete 
difference, un likeness 

The goal of diveis, 
not to say cultures are equal. 
Rather, it is to learn about 
other people and cultures 

It a student is only ex- 
posed to people, ideas, reli- 
gions and cultures that one 
is accustomed to. why leave 
home'' 

Diversity did not develop 
wilhin western culture 

Throughout history there 
are examples of people inte 
grating wiih other cultures 
Take the Republic of Rome as 
an example 



One reason why they were 
able to grow so large and 
so powerful is because they 
were able to assimilate de- 
feated foes iiitn their republic 
and have them feel like they 
were part of the country. 

In a diverse environment, 
individuals do not lose their 
equality, liberty or indi- 
viduality Rather, they are 
celebrated Proponents t 

versify believe thai "thinking 
outside the box" is impera- 
tive, and that humans should 
choose to explore and evolve 
intQ educated members of the 
world 

Our culture is the bask 
assumptions about our world 
But in order to build on that 
foundation, we must learn 



how to and welcome other 
ideas, viewpoints and opin- 
ions. 

Diversity is not some 
vague, cheery ideal held by 
numerous students 

Diversity celebrates the in- 
finite amount of difference on 
unpus, in Kansas, these 
United States and the world 

Diversity dues not preach 
about equality, that is our 
Peel,': Independence 

It preaches that ideas from 
different backgrounds ben- 
efit not only the individual 
person but the body of the 
given populace, in this - 
ite 

Thomat Bonier 
SCMtOK III H 



Snip N' Clip 

Hair cut stops 



Highlite & color 
service available 



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539-4043 776-6410 

M-F 9am-7pm 

Sat 9am- 5 pm 



KSU Theatre & Dance and 

the Department of Music 

Present 



the musical 



November 1 7-19 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



book by 

Roger O, Hi rson 

Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public: $13.50 



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music and lyrics by 
Stephen Schwartz 



McCain Box Office 
532-6428 weekdays 



www.ksu.edu/sctd 



®gdg© 8m Lifetii 

•ngogement* and weddings 

"My Mom cried." 

Once in a Lifetime, in the Collegian the first 
Friday of the month. 



to announn your mitotan*, visit Kedzia 103. lb advertise, call 532-6560. 



Editor, 

I look a short, non -scientific 
poll to test the knowledge ol 
those around mc on Friday I 

asked "what federal holiday is 
recognized today 7 " And then 

what does 11, U, 11 mean, in 
respect to tins holiday 7 " 

The power i if the press is 
unlimited It has helped f 

iii>l end wars, and when an edi- 
tor has in it bem afraid to show 
grephk EmtflH of racial itieo,u;tl- 

iinic cleansing, starving 
children, genocide, murder and 
numerous other acts of evil, it 
has changed history 

I rid*J from Bluemont Hall 
to Call Hall, veterans read your 
newspaper quietly As they 



read, many began asking, isn't 
today Veteran's Day '*" And then 
"Why did the editor not assign 
a reporter to prepare mm 
sentence on some facet ot thil 
holiday to inform the students 
ol K-Stale?" 

Sadly, you missed a wonder 
nil opportunity to showcase 
those around you who have sac 
rificed so much, and have asked 
for nothing in return, except a 
simple acknowledgment ol their 
existence 

In life, you never forget how 
someone made you feel How 
they showed their appreciiitii m 
for your effort, sacrifice or com- 
mitment will stay with you long 
after their words of thanks or 
advice have been forgotten 



So to the Collegian itafl 
editorial I thai 

lectsioi i to notify tin 

student body thai last It! 
was \ 

received snd undersl 

today I had hoped peoj 
would remember those who 
riavt sacrificed thee 
cence selfless ly, so thai otlw 
woutdn t Iuim 

Mv ordj hot ■ 
when the mailbox is empty, 
someone passes lh< Manhat 
Lin Mercun along In explain 
why no mail was delivered I 
PHd 

Fred H. S hockey III 



Theory of creationism is unprovable 



Editor, 

As much as he would like 
to, | on as should see thai 
there is very little that can be 
J between science and 
theology The major reason for 
this is that debating the two is 
like playing a game of "1 Win." 
The science-based argument 
can present study after study 
and a multitude of evidence. 
but will quickly be trumped by 
the theologian 'a God card. 

It's true that there is dif- 
ficulty in establishing exactly 
what mechanism may have 
started life billions of years 

but the moment you chalk 
it up to God, you eliminate any 
science from the equation. I 
worship God, but saying that 
it thing happened because 
idled it is the ultimate cop- 
out when it comes to scientific 

• ♦ 



Student cuts $7.9541; 



KSU Meat Sale! 

FRIDAY • Noon -5:45 p.m. |j*f 
km. 166 • Weber Hall 






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\ 






- 4 



/*AN», 



, SM>i 



Friday November 18 

vs. Georgia Southern 

7pm 
Bramlage Coliseum 



Show your Missouri football 

ticket and purchase a 

G.A. ticket for only $10 



/ -v f \, , f s. 



GO STATE! 



Royal Purple yearbook 



we've got the stories you've got to read 



Buy your copy 
in Kediie I 03 
or call 532-6555 



reasoning 

The two sides are lootb.d! 
and soccer, both trying to 
score, but playing by entirely 
different and exclusive rules 

Theology and science are 
apples and oranges with little 
in the way of common ground. 
and as such they should not 
be taught in the same class, 
Creationism could he readily 
taught in a social studies class 
as it addresses the beliel 
the peoples of the world 

However, there is no way to 



test ,m\ theory i> : 
so then l»m 
taught in a cla 

instill tin |od 

In the end creationism is i 
theory ol faith, and tvoluti 

faith is h,is, d ■ 
which -d or dis- 

proved, wh 

prove things through physii 
examination 

Tart \ 

dm 



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OPINION 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Fans should 

respect 

Snyder's legacy 

Bill Snyder never wanted a big, emo- 
tional news conference to draw the 
curtain on his career. 

Even now, he prefers to remain 
unassuming. He was always one to 
toil quietly in his of 
fice in the corner of 
the Vanier Football 
Complex, rather than 
stand in the spotlight 

It is that demeanor 
that endeared him to 
countless K-State fans 
over the years, 

Snyder's disposition 
and tenacious work 
ethic are what made 
htm the architect of 
the single greatest 
turnaround in the his- 
tory of college foot- 
ball - the Miracle in 
Manhattan, as some have called it. 

A program that was once dubbed 
"Futility U" by Sports Illustrated and 
a university that was merely a dot on 
a map suddenly became a destination. 
K-State became synonymous with ex- 
cellence. 

The values of faith, leadership and 
determination that Snyder has instilled 
in a generation of student-athletes 
have spilled over into those not affili- 
ated with K-State football. 
His impact has been that far-reaching. 

When Saturday's game comes to 
an end, respect the stadium that now 
bears his name. Stand and applaud 
Snyder, wherever you are, with the all 
respect that he deserves. Drink in a 
moment that you will remember for- 
ever 



To the point is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion Is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown b at k 
Matthew Girard 
Matt Gorney 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Mendoza 
Alex Peek 
Catrina Rawson 
Krlsten Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e mail to lettmnispub.ksii.edu. or in person to 
Kedjle 116 Please include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



S^\l A H 5 A S STATE 

Collegian 



Ma«h»w Guard 

fouomiKHiti 


Johanna Oar nat 

«»NMilK.[llira« 


fct Istan Rod*? kh 

WWSfOllOU 


Matt Camay 

comtniF 


Catrina Rawton 

PHOTO [MI(M 


Mkhaol Aihioid 

smmonoR 


Annatta Lawlas t 

MMOViDNM 


Abby Brown back 
EMMS MM 


Ak« Paak 

'HI EMI [W!Wt 


Jonas Hogg 

oeiMOttEOiro* 


Anthony Mandou 

mi u mfm ion i Duron 


Curtis John ton 

ONIIMf (Dlioa 


Oiwikitnt 

wiiiwuontK 


Orad Simmon i 


Andy Walter 

«H1 tElMAMl.!* 




CONTACT US 






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Illustrations, by Eric Thompson | COLltGI'N 



Women want 
to be romanced 



It was a couple of Mondays ago when it first 
happened to me I was walking down Claflin Road, 
minding my own business, hands in my pockets 
and a smile on my lips I was enjoying yet another 
gorgeous fall day in Manhattan as 1 made my way 
to my next class 

Upon admiring the foliage on the other side of 
the street, I happened to make eye contact with a 
boy dressed in red 

Being in the good mood that I was, I flashed 
this boy my best Crest-kid smile and was just about 
to let my eyes wander back to the fall scenery 
when he opened his mouth and a song floated out. 

His melodic words came together in mid air and 
formed a snng about a girt At that moment I was 
in a state of confusion which soon turned to shock 
when I realized this boy was singing to me I think 



my jaw actually dropped. 
The boy and I happened to be walking in dif- 
ferent directions on Claflin so 
the moment was quickly over, 
but the overwhelming feeling 
stayed with me all day. 

Now let me clarify be- 
fore anyone jumps lo con- 
clusions. No, just because 
this boy serenaded me doesn't 
mean that I want to date him. It 
doesn't mean that he is now a love 
interest and it doesn't even mean 
that i plan to try and look him up on 
Pacebook.com. 
It's not about that at all. It was about a 
man, with no hidden agenda, no sneaky 
intentions, being capable of making my day 
without any real effort. It was about the thrill of 
the surprise 11 was about being in a good mood 
and having someone boast it to a 
stellar mood 

I had no idea that a man would 
sing to me on the street that day, 
or any day for that matter It was a 
nice gesture, a voice like an angel's 
that kept a smile on my face for 
the rest of the day 

Men, just imagine, if a song on 
the street could put a girl on cloud 
nine, think of what a surprise pic 
nic in the park could do Imagine 
the feelings of happiness and joy 
you could make erupt in a woman just by making 
kind gestures 

Now I'm not saying the men of K-State aren't 
making an effort to woo the women. But I am say- 
ing the anecdote I'm sharing with you is a prime 
example of the simplicity behind making a woman 
melt. 

Women like to be romanced, it's true. And men. 
you don't have to be romantically interested in a 
woman to romance her. No, I'm talking about tak 
ing your best female friend out for a night on the 
town, simply to make her feel special 

All this isn't about dating or falling in love, it's 
about men using their power of making girls weak 
in the knees just to brighten a day It's about mak 
ing a girl feel on top of the world without making 
her feel that a possible relationship is about to 
deploy. It's about a man using his talents (singing, 
cooking, dancing, whatever) to make a girl giddy, 
no strings attached 

If you have that ability, what's the hanti in using 



Alyss* Atfunder b t freshmen In print Journalism, Pleas* send your 



ALVSSA 

ALEXANDER 



Girlfriends provide compassion, grace 




One uf my best friends and 1 
love going to the movies and stock- 
ing up on junk food. We love stroll- 
ing the Plaza in 
Kansas City, Mo. , 
we don't even 
need to have any 
money We always 
call when some- 
thing happens, 
good or bad. 
Another friend of 
mine and I love 
to sit out on the 
front stoop with a 
beer on nice days 
We love to play in the snow, and 
we can always pick out clothes fur 
each other 

Surprisingly, both of these 
(riends are guys And while these 
friendships are irreplaceable and 
priceless to me, I have learned that 
in certain situations, even these 
guys are no replacement for a good 
girl friend. 

I have wandered what it is 
about the relationships between girl 
friends that makes them so power- 
ful. To me, they can turn a boring 
Sunday afternoon into one of your 
best memories with just a trip to 
the mall, or make you see that you 
will survive when your heart Is 
broken. 

lust the other day, I was watch- 
ing an episode of "Sex and the 
City" - I realize it is not the most 
reliable source For information 
- but the women's friendship is a 
stream of truth that runs through- 



out the series 

When Carrie leams thai her 
ex is marrying Natasha, she is 
devastated, but after she discusses 
her devastation with her friends, 
Samuniha adds at the end, "Wlut 
kind of name is Natasha anyway?" 
II may seem like nothing but a 
nasty comment, but what Saman- 
thu really mcanl is that she is on 
Carrie's side, and that whoever 
hurts Carrie is no friend of Samaii- 
tha's 

A cliche example from an ele- 
ment of pop culture, maybe, but 
what it says about women's loyalty 
to their best friends is powerful. 

Recently, I have experienced the 
meaning of a true girts' night out 
There is plenty of fun to be had in 
a night of exchanging glances with 
the guy behind the bar, but there is 
genuine healing power in a night 
sans testosterone. 

Last Saturday, 1 spent the night 
sharing laughs, drinks and the 
dance floor with three great friends 
This has been one of my most over- 
whelming semesters, and I 've found 
myself unfocused and dragging my 
feet 

But this week, I've been infi- 
nitely more organized and self-dis- 
ciplined, and even landed myself a 
new job. Some may say it's just a 
coincidence, but I'll always be- 
lieve that the cure for just about 
anything, including my apathy, is 
a few hours with the girls. There is 
something strengthening in being 
reminded that there will always be 



someone there for you. 

I'll be the first to say guys can 
make great friends They're great al 
making us laugh, scaring away the 
creepy guy who's eyeing us in the 
bar and for a playing our favorite 
song on the guitar 

It is OK 
that their 



faces turn white and they have no 
words when they see tears welling 
in our eyes, or that they have no 
understanding of our beauty rituals, 
because that is what our girls are 
fur. So thanks girls, I love you 



Addle Laue n * Junior m mast communkatrons 
Please send your comments to opinion ^ipub. 




CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's 
anonymous talNn system The f ourum is 
edited to eliminate vulgar, racist obscene 
and libelous comments The comments are 
not the opinion of the Collegian nor are 
they endorsed by the editorial staff 

To alltfiepeeajievt** whine about the 
Collegian, whit do you do In your local 
newspaper when there is no Fourum? Then 
wratdtiyouwhineabwl?Cm,lknow, 
then you betonv politicians 

Seme eagle w*$ chowfcng down on But- 



ters in front of Anderson on Wednesday. If s 
the circle of lite 



Phil Bennett Is no "no name " If you 

knew anything about K-State football, 
you'd know he used to be one of Snyder's 
best assistants. 

St> Stg ip'sctefc b prob*W* the best 
took ever Yesterday she took a match and 
t fork and made a chocolate cake out of it. 

Set kh for coach. Seriously, how funny 
woutt It be If we ganked Nebraska 'sold 



head coach? 

That s right, If weren't for the soldiers 
who are giving their lives for you, then 
you wouldn't haw the righl to bitch. So be 
thankful, not critical. 

If t were • shark, I would try not to bite 
my tongue! 

I wish the story about George Bush 
and the Supreme Court were true. That 
would be awesome I low W. 



Hey, everyone. Check out hockersmrth. 
net for the Bill Snyder tribute. 

Kody Cooper, no one's holding a knife 
to your throat and making you celebrate 
Thanksgiving, you fatso If you don't want 
to eat turkey, then don't, lust shut up. 

Zach Eckels, good column I don't blame 
the soldiers, but I still wish someone would 
assassinate a bad president for once 

let* Shrimplin, you're right. God made 
everyone unique and gave mem the 



freedom of choice. 

Tearing down goalposts Is Bush league, 
ft Is something that shoddy programs like 
KU do in the rare event of a win. It would 
be a disgrace to coach Snyder and all that 
he's achieved 

Everyone needs to check out tinyurt, 
comM4yy. It Is a tribute to Snyder, try not 
to try. 

Chuck Norrfj was the fourth wise man. 
He brought baby Jesus the gift of "beard" 



Jesus wore It proudly to his dying day. The 
other wisemen, jealous of Jesus' obvious 
gift favoritism, used their combined 
influence to have Chuck omitted from the 
Bible. Shortly after, all three died from 
roundhouse kicks to the face 

IhateftwhenpeoDttUlkabouMhe 
fourum In the fourum, That's so lame. 



Need astrt feanmf 6a t* mwmJattttai- 
(iftarUM fiftb Ml vmlM, 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Paq 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Marching band deserves SGA funding | Collegian wrong for not informing 

community of Veteran's Day meaning 



Editor, 
I'm a member of "He Pride 

Of Wildcat Land," K-State 
Marching Rand, but I am also 
a member of the student body 
It is somewhat obvious that I 
have a certain bill toward the 
band, hut still I believe il 1 were 
not in the band my opinion 
would not be different 

I've been informed that re- 
cent focus groups have voiced 
an opinion which has been 
perceived to be in line with the 
majority opinion of the student 
bod) - that students prefer to 
hear music and commercials 
over the luinhotron than the 
marching hand's playing 

I find this awfully hard to 
believe, considering that every 
time I wear a K- St ate Band 
shirt, people slop to tell me 



how much they love the band 
and how we're doing the most 
amazing shows they've seen 
from Ibe band in years 

Recently, SGA announced 
ils plans to reduce funding for 
the band, if not do away with 
funding all together 

This would be a devastat- 
ing blow to the band program 
and if I may say so, the entire 
atmosphere of K-Statc football 
as we know it. 

Before the KU game this 
year, there was an article in a 
Lawrence newspaper thai read 

"During i he football practice 

Kansas conducted Wednes- 
day in Memorial Stadium, the 
Wabash Cannnnlxtll blared at 
limes on the loudspeakers, a 
device used to get the |ayhawks 
aeeu stun ied to the next atmo- 
sphere they'll face on the road" 



They weren't blaring the 
"Hey Song nor were thev pre 
paring lo hear Ihe LI MR Bank 
trivia." Tlu'v ware worried 
aboul making sure they could 
handle the atmosphere caused 
hv the hand 

We work bard to do what 
Vt do, and lake great pride in 
what we accomplish I would 

lie no less lli.ill offended to see 
ni\ liars) work and dedication 
be pushed aside to make room 
(in rock music and Iruck com- 
mercials 

1 hope SGA would recon- 
tUK without "pride 
what do we have? 



Matthew Garcia 

• ! 1AUHAM MAI. I 

Al IB SAXOPHONE 



Diversity showcases differences, 
not meant to mean cultural equality 



Editor, 

diversity - noun 

1 the quality or condition 
of being diverse; complete 
difference, unlikencss 

The goal of diversity is 
not to M) cultural are equal. 
Rather, il is to learn about 
other people and cultures. 

If a student is only ex- 
posed to people, ideas, reli 
gions and cultures that one 
is accustomed to. why leave 
home? 

Diversity did not develop 
within western culture 

Throughout history (here 
are examples of people inte- 
grating with other cultures 
Take the Republic of Rome as 
an example 



One reason why (hey were 
able tu grow SO large and 
so powerful is because they 
were able to assimilate de- 
feated foes into their republic 
and have them feel like they 
were part of ihe country. 

In a diverse environment, 
individuals do not lose their 
equality, liberty or indi- 
viduality Rather, (hey are 
celebrated Proponents of di- 
versity believe thai "thinking 
outside the box" is impera- 
tive, and thai humans should 
choose (o explore and evolve 
into educated members of (he 
world. 

Our culture is ihe basic 
assumptions aboul our world 
but in order to build on that 
foundation, we must learn 



how to and welcome other 

ideas, viewpoints and op in 

Diversity is ma w 
vague, cheery ideal held by 
numerous students 

Divers its celebrate! Ihe in- 
finite amount of dill 
our campus, in Kan 
United States and the world. 

Diversity dues ttol pre.n.ti 
about equality; thai is our 
Declaration of independence 

It preaches thai ideas from 
different backgrounds ben- 
ehl not only the individual 
person bul the body of the 
given populace, in this ease 
K State, 

Thomai Botzler 

MNiOHiNMisrwY 



Snip IM' Clip 

Hair cut stops 



Student cuts $7.95 I; 



High lite & color 
service available 



3035 Anderson & 431 E. Poyntz 

539-4043 776-6410 

M-F 9am-7pm 

Sat 9am-5pm 



KSU Theatre & Dance and 
the Department of Musk 

Present 



Si 



the musical 



November 1 7-1 9 at 8 p.m. 

November 20 at 3 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



book by 

Roger O.Hirson 

Student: $9.50 
Seniors: $11.50 
Public: $13.50 



music and lyrics by 
Stephen Schwartz 



tea* *. 



GodsP ei 



McCain Box Office 
fi 532-6428 weekdays 

]0& 1 1 :00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

www.ksu.edu/sctd 



©mo© (too Lifetime 

engagements and weddings 



n 



My Mom cried." 

Once in a Lifetime, in Ihe Collegian the first 
Friday of the month. 



To announce your milestone, visit Kedile 103. To advertise, call 532-6560. 



Editor, 

I took a short, miivscicntii'ii 
poll to lest | he knowledge <>( 
those around im on Friday I 
asked "what federal holidiii is 
reoogniwd today'*" And then 
what dOM II, 11, 11 mean, in 
respect to this holiday?" 

Tile power of the press is 
unlimited- It has helped to start 
and end wars, and when an edi 
lor has not been afraid to show 
graphic images of racial iuequal- 
thnic cleansing, starving 

children, genocide, murder and 
numerous other acts of evil, il 
1 1, is thanked history. 

Kridav, from Bluemonl Hall 
to Call Hall, veterans read yotll 
new spaper quietly. As ihey 



read, many began asking, "isn't 
today Veteran's Day'*" And (hen 
"Why did the editor not assign 
a reporter tu prepare even one 
sentence on some facet of this 
holiday lo inform the students 
of K-State?" 

Sadly, you missed a wonder 
ful opportunity to showcase 
those around you who have sat 
rificed so much, and have asked 
for nothing in return, except a 
simple acknowledgment of their 
existence 

In life, you never forget how 
someone made you fee) How 
they showed their appreciation 
for your effort, sacrifice nr con 
mitment will stay with you I 
after their words of thanks or 
advice have been forgotten 



So to llie Collegian Mat. 
editorial board thi that 

your decision not to notif) 
student bodj thai la 
«as Veteran's Daj I 
received and understood 

today I I ' peopti 

would ri'n who 

have sacrificed their inno- 

seiflessJ) 
wouldnl have lo 

\h ..iik hope now is thai 
when the mail! ipiy, 

someone | Manhaf 

lull Mi'ii ii to explain 

whj no mail was delivered '■ 

I'riit 






r-.ed H, Shockey III 

I USANM1 
IIAHON 



Theory of creationism is unprovable 



Editor, 

As much as he would like 
to, Jonas should see I hat 
there is very tittle that can be 
I d between KienCfl and 
theology. The major reason for 
this is that debating the two is 
like playing a game of "I Win." 
Ihe -•• atfld argument 

can present study after study 
and a multitude of evidence, 
bul will quickly be trumped by 
the theologian's God card 

It's true that ihere is dif 
Mculty in establishing exactly 
what mechanism may have 
Started life billions of years 
ago, but the moment you chalk 
it up to God. you eliminate any 
science from the equation. 1 
worship God, bul saying that 
something happened because 
he willed it is the ultimate cop- 
out when it comes to scientific 



KSU Meat Sale 



I-'KIDAY • 
Rm. 166 



Noon-5:45 p.m. 
Weber Hall 



BEEF 1 

<tcak, ground beef, btetwwsl 
PORK 

|Xirk chops, pork steaks MM) 

grout 
Will 
chop -i mind lamb 



Paid for to 
Kansas Sian 

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For information call 
532-127« 



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- <* 



SANSA, 



, sum 



Friday November 18 

vs. Georgia Southern 

7pm 
Bramlage Coliseum 



Show your Missouri football 

ticket and purchase a 

G.A. ticket for only $10 



GO STATE! 



Royal Purple yearbook 



we'vejpt the stories you've got to read. 



Buy your copy 
in Kedzie 1 03 
or call 532-6555 



reasoning 

The two sides are foul ha II 
and soccer, both trying to 
score, but playing by entirely 
different and exclusive rules 

Theology and science are 
apples and oranges with litlle 
in the way of common ground. 
and as such they should noi 
be taught in the same cl 
Creationism could he readily 
taught in a social studies cl 
as it addresses the beliefs ol 
the peoples of the world 

However, there is no way to 



lest am iii.Kii ol t rcaitonii 
so there is no way it should 
. d lo 
instill the st leniiiiL method 

In the cud. creationism it 
theory ol fait! 
is ,i theorj ol 

Pail 
which can ed or dis- 

proved, while science tri 
prove i)i | hysicnl 

exam 

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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



VOLLEYBALL 



K-State looks for upset against No. 1 Nebraska 



By Mark Potter 
KAN'.. LOAN 

lhi' K -State volleyball team 
. us toughest tesl ol 
tin.' season when tl squares ofl 
No 1 Nebraska Satur- 
■ Sab 
\<n onlj are (he Comhusk- 
indefea! 
but they have defeated op- 
posing I 

■|i in nine ol 1 1 matches at 

■ 
li will bt- tough l" play up 
in Lincoln i 

in their home 

I mil inn tn 
it should be u fun 



match," junior outside hit 
Sand) Wernej 

Wernei was bus ol 
Wildcats lo garner double d 
kills in K-State's 3-2 win o 
No 24 Colorado Wednesday al 
Ahearn Field lluu.se 

Senior outside hitter 
Rezende, who led K State in 
kills with 19 agm; 
said the Wildcats showed more 
heart and intensity on Wedrtcs 

"We wain to keep lhi 

and end (In 

much he- Rezende 

said 

With only three rcgulai 
son matcl 



(18-9, n-8i may need at least 
one mure win in receive an in- 
vitation Hi the NCAA Tourna- 
ment 

While it will be difficult to 
defeat Nebra said 

has nn doubt her team is 

i tble ol pulling off the up- 

We can definitely upset 

them, and we are going to 

i them," Rezende 

s.i id "That's our goal for every 

Nebraska, which received all 
60 ;. votes in the N 

14 Division I Coaches Top 25 
Poll, leads the Big 12 Confer- 
ence in hitting percentage, kills 



per game and blocks, 

"Unfortunately for us, they 
are probably one of the best 
collegiate volleyball teams I 
have seen in some time, and 
certainly the best Nebraska 
team in some lime," coach Su- 
rttss said 

However, K-State holds an 
advantage over the Cornhusk 
Mrs in one statistical category: 
ica aces. 

K-Slale averages 1.42 aces 
per game, good for fifth in ihe 
Dig 12 The Wildcats have had 
at least one service ace in 220 

i »ecutive matches, Ihe 
ond-longesl streak in the na 

tlllll 



"We knew going into the 
year that our serving could be 
one or our identities; one of the 
things we could be great at," 
Fritz said. "We have put a lot 
nf time into il." 

K-State volleyball players 
have also invested a lot of time 
into their studies. As reported 
earlier (his week, eight Wild- 
cats rained All-Big 12 Academ- 
ic honors, which is the most in 
Fritz's five-year tenure. 

"They make it a priority to 
be a student and an athlete, and 
ihey balance their time well," 
Fritz said. "1 am very proud of 
the fact Ihey were able to ac- 
complish that" 




ANTHONY 
MENOOZA 



Sacramento 
continues 

streak 
of bad ideas 



fa into ihe NBA sca- 

nty surprise so far 
Los Angeles Clippers The 
v ity Roy- 
als ol the NBA 
itting atop 
the Pacific Divi- 
sion of the West 

Kobe Bryant has 
reverted back lo 
jacking up shots 
after another 
The New York 
Knicks are still 
a bad basketball 
i h l^rry Brown as 
h and now (hat the 
U dross (.ode is over 
brilUant public rela- 
f y iiniiuussioner Da- 
■t 'ill his plan dunng 
the World Series), 
ts of the season are 
■■< mason Shaq part 
laj 
Thi for ihe Sacra- 

ii i owbell-toting 
as casino hotel 
ihere would be 
about besides I he 
inrdveraaij of the brawl 
liana I ' tcers and 
fans that showed 
i ' happen the moment a 
(an si the court or player 

mds. 

■ ,. ' , : 

the 
I im- 
■ -.i man 
• agalnat 

ine, intro- 
iied 

i ilea ni 
i 
It did "ni faze the Pistons, who 
nped the last* 
■„ 102-88 

i owners, Joe and 
apologized for 
night full page 
advi i in The 

i nil The !>■ 
New izinj Ioj tha ikpic- 

lion S Mo 

tor i 

If this is the (irsl time the 

King tton had 

c stupid, you would 
hav , but it's n 

Go back to the first round of 
'IXW playoffs The Kings or 
ganization thought it would he 

i an oversized 
Lakers jersey and light it on lire 
inie started Good 
rowd pumped up, 
hul n I planned out when 

you arc playing indoors and the 

smoke Joes nut have much room 
to escape 

Tin tin wiih 

proud m nto 

«l eat a career mile- 
inn',; his 20,000th point 
,if ins , ani.T Unfortunately he did 

I in i to, where Oakland 

((aiders fans hung out during the 
\M ofiseaaoa, which usually 
comes soon to those fans of the 
silver and black. 

Meal was presented with the 
game ball. Unfortunately, it was 
vraphed by a Kings fan with 
cd at O'Neal. 
That's (u.st a Kings fan being a 
f<aid. ttt without them, all 

you could talk about would be the 
tntomo Spurs, who just shut 
. nmuths and play, and we 
know It. in at all 



Anthony Mm4«u « a ***** in print 
jwwMijw, Tou on * Ml Nat* 
tpom*ip*bJm**i 



Starting fresh 

Wildcats open 

season against 

Georgia Southern 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS SlAlEiOUldAN 

:arts tonight 
icipatlon i has 

been on lhi rise fat a I and lo- 

night, the K-State men's basketball lean 

will take the first Step toward pruvm, 
is for real 

diss at a . 
pearancc tl the players 

and the COax I line will 

be important this seas n reaching I heir 

goal ni making* postseason tournament 

The proc lit al 

Bramlage Coliseum Georgia 

Southern University Georgia Southern 
enters the contest wilh all record al 
competing in die 2K Sports Coaches 

CancBj i lassie. 
Coach Jim W 
will challenge the Wildcats in sevi ral u 
eas, partici the perimeter 

ntheiii is) an cxpl 
team," Wooldndge said Tlicy may h 
the quickest perimeter that we will face 
all year. They're very quick and fasl. 
and they play a very e offer*- 

game. II I lensively, 

they're tough to handle 

Georgia Southern ii led by reluming 
senior guard Elton Nesbitt Standing only 
Neshin hai led hi I en 

ing the paM 
18.5 poini ; 

After a deiei- 
Olid half of I 
against 

COIl!. ' I 

since last Thui 

■ pay off I 
der to stop Gi luthem, |ui 

ward Can 

"'Hi ,1 guard play," 

hi- i lungs 
wt n- working on I 
get loose We 
in front ol the ball, contesting shots 




Catrlni Rawson | COUEGIAN 
K- State's Clent Stewart dribbles around an Emporia State defender Nov, 10 at Bramlage 
Coliseum. The Wildcats play at 7 tonight against Georgia Southern. 



K-State vs. Georgia Southern 

When: / tonigtit 
Where: Brtmugr Coliseum 
Haw much: Fffl ticket Info, ull KSU Met Office at 
HI 

gelling the rebound," 

In slow down Neshnt, K State plans 
li> i. 1 ditlcrcnt players against 

him in hopes that Nesbilt will eventually 



get tired. 

"Were going lo throw a little bit of 
everyone at him," sophomore point guard 
< lent Stewart said "He's their go-to guy 
He comes off a lot of screens, so we're 
uj in have three or four guys chas- 
ing him around during the course of the 
game." 

The Eagles started the season with an 

See MIN Page 12 



Women's team focuses on building foundation for season 




Chfi«oph»t HarMwlndwl | lOlUOIAN 
Shake Lehntng drives the lane during the second halt of K-Sute's game 
against Emporia State. K-State will play Detroit at 2 p.m Sunday at 
Rramiag* Coliseum. 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS S1MKOIK01AN 

Afler seven months of 
anticipation, game one is 
finally in sight 

The Wildcats couldn't 
be happier because now 
the hype and jitters are 
history, the team can 
focus on the beginning 
of its season, freshman 
guard Shalee Lchning 
said 

"The first game, you 
got to get it out of the 
way," Lehning said "We 
had to build a founda- 
tion, and now that we 
have that, we're just go- 
ing to keep going up from 
l here." 

The Detroit Titans are 
K -Slate's first regular sea- 
son opponent, with whom 
the Wildcats will match 
■P at 2 p.m., Sunday 
Even though Detroit fin- 
ished with a 9-20 record 
last season, the Wildcat! 
can't take any team tight- 
ly this season, coach Deb 
Patterson said. 

We know this will be 
a very competitive team 
iing into this arena," 
Patterson said. "They've 
got some good outside 
shooters, so they're really 
going to test us wilh our 
defensive ability." 

The Wildcats want to 
pass the defensive lest, 
so they have paid close 



K State vs. Detroit 

When: 1 p m Sunday 
Where: Bt ami age Coliseum 
How much; free with student If) 

attention in practice this 
pasl week, senior guard 
Claire Coggins said 

"We've been working 
together to be in the help 
(defense) and not just 
sticking to our man," Cog- 
gins said, "We're working 
on normal defensive con- 
cepts" 

Their close win against 
Emporia State shed light 
on K-Stale's inability to 
set up a consistently ef- 
fective offense, Lehning 
■aid 

"We need to execute 
more and be more pro- 
ductive each possession," 
Lehning said. "We have 
a lot of dry spells during 
games where we're not 
very productive, so we've 
kind of been focusing on 
that" 

Against Emporia Stale, 
the K-State guards strug- 
gled to get the ball to the 
posts, and, at the same 
time, the posts had a hard 
lime getting open. For the 
Wildcats to be successful 
this season, they realize 
the importance of getting 
the ball down low. 

"We're going to try 
and pack it in because if 

Set WOMEN Pag* 12 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

GLF | Men's golf inks 
4 for 2006-07 season 

K-State men's golf coach Tim Morris 
announced the signing of four high 
school golfers fot the 2006-07 season. 
Joe Ida, Ross Geubelle. Brian Larson and 
Jason Schutte all have signed national 
letters of intent to join the Wildcat golf 
program. 

"These guys are a great fit for our 
program," Norris said. "They tame in 
and were really Impressed with the 
facilities and the opportunity to further 
their game. All of them have their best 
golf in front of them. Ihey have a strong 
work ethic and bask fundamentals of 
the game, and we will try to supply the 
rest." 

The Associated Press 

SPT | Kansas Sports Hal! 
of Fame reopens in Wichita 

WICHITA - Moie than three years 
after closing its doors in Abilene, the 
Kansas Spons Hall of fame reopened 
Thursday at its new site in Wichita 

Memorabilia in the hall includes 52 
Sports Illustrated covers with a Kansas 
team or person wilh Kansas ties on the 
first floor of the new 27,000 sguare foot 
facility in Wichita's Old Town entertain 
ment district 

Ted Hayes, Kansas Sports Hall of 
Fame executive director, said the new 
two-story halt is much larger than its 
original home in Abilene, which closed 
in the summer of 2002 The reopening 
followed a SI. 2 million fund raising 
campaign. 

The first Kansas Sports Hall of 
fame was founded in 1961 dunnq the 
Kansas Centennial Celebration There 
are 141 inductees currently enshrined 
at the hall. 

Regular admission is 57 lor adults 
and 56 for students K- 12, seniors and 
military Children under 6 get in free 



MLB | Owners unanimously 
approve steroids agreement 

MILWAUKEE - Baseball owners 
voted unanimously Thursday to approve 
the toughened steroids policy agreed to 
with the players association earlier this 
week 

The union's executive board will 
decide when it meets Dec. S-9 whether 
all players should vote to ratify the 
agreement or if board approval is suffi- 
cient 

Spurred by the threat of federal 
legislation, players and owners agreed 
Tuesday to a new deal that would start 
before spring training Players would 
get a SO -game suspension for a first 
positive test, miss 100 games for a 
second offense and face a lifetime ban 
for a third. 

The sport's current penalties art a 
10-day suspension for a first offense, 30 
days foe a second offense and 60 days 
for a third. Theeartlest a player could be 
banned fot life Is a fifth offense 




NFL | Maddox to start; 

Randle El taking reps 

PITTSBURGH — Tommy Maddox 
went from being the Pittsburgh 
Steeiers' starting guarter back to No, 
3 on the depth 
chart in barely 
a year's time. 
Despite a steep 
slide that admit 
tedry tested his 
confidence, he 
said he always 
felt he would 
start again 

What he Maddox 

didn't know was It would be this soon. 

With Ben Roethlhberger still not 
ready to return from a knee Injury, 
Maddox will be the Steeiers' quarter- 
back Sunday in Baltimore — the third 
starter In a month for a team that has 
won its last four games 

CFB | Georgia Tech put 
on probation for 2 years 

ATLANTA — The NCAA placed 
Georgia Tech on two years of proba 
tton Thursday for using 1 7 academi- 
cally ineligible athletes in four sports, 
including 11 in football. 

It is the flrst time Georgia Tech 
has been placed on probation. 

The school had proposed ielf- 
imposcd sanctions, Including one year 
on probation. 

Georgia Tech, which argued the 
violations were not intentional, Is 
considering an appeal of the penal- 
ties 

"We are disappointed by the 
ruling of the NCAA Committee on 
Infractions," Georgia Tech athletic 
director Dave Bralne said. 

The NCAA's Committee on 
Infractions accepted the school's 
proposed scholarship reductions in 
football and men's and women's track. 

A violation also was found in the 
women's swimming program, but 
the swimmer Involved was not on 
scholarship, so that program was not 
penalized with a scholarship reduc 
tion. 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



The man 

black 



Born as J.R. in Arkansas in 1932, Cash was the sun 
of poor Southern Baptist cotton fanners By the tittle Ik 
was 12, Cash began writing his own songs During tiigh 
school, he began playing for KLCN, an Arkansas radio 
station. 

During his Grand Ole Opry debut in 1957, Cash per- 
formed wearing all black instead of the usual decadent 
outfits most performers wore He was dubbed "The Man 
in Black." 

Disagreements with Sun Records because of royalties 
and Phillips' refusal to allow Cash to record a gospel re- 
cord caused Cash to leave his contract and sign with Co- 
lumbia Records. 

In 1959, Cash began taking 
amphetamines. He moved to New 
York away from his family and 
the law. During one of his (ours 
he met June Carter, wife of one 
of Cash's drinking buddies Carl 
Smith. 

Carter helped Cash return to 
the charts with one of his most 
lasting songs, "Ring of Fire" The 
song illustrated the hell that Cart- 
er and Cash endured 

It was during this time that 
Cash had a number of run-ins with the law One- of the 
most infamous was Cash's arrest in El Paso, Tfexas, where 
he was caught smuggling amphetamines in his guitar case 
During this time, his wife Vivian filed for divorce. 



During this time. Cash was making a comeback He 
began going into many prisons across the country and per- 
forming for the inmates because he deeply sympathized 
with them. He recorded and released his 
most popular album, "johnny Cash at Fol- 
som Prison" Cash also recorded on Bob 
Dylan's country-rock album, "Nashville, 
Skyline" He began "Tin- Johnny Cash 
Show" on ABC in 1969. which ran until 
1971 





Cub's popularity 

peaked in the mid 1970s, 
but it declined into the 
80s as court try radio 
began to favor more con- 
temporary art iv: also 
lost his contract with Columbia. 
forcing him to sign with Mercu 
Nashville In 1980, Cash became 
the youngest inductee into Ihe Cow 
try Music Hall of I ame 



However, Cftsfl r:in into label 
problems again and Mercury NashvUl 
didn't renew his contract In Wi, he 
signed with fan • onfat Rick 

Rubin produce J "American ii 
ings," Cash's first record with American. It 
performed moderately well commercially, but it pit Ctstl 
much critical acclaim as well as earning him i 
more rock-oriented audi- 



He released three more alliums with Anu-i icon Uccurds, 
but health problems began to plague ' Ban's 2002 

album, "American IV The Man Come) Around," N 
him much media attention, especially due ver of 

Nine Inch Nails song "Hurt" June Carter Cash djed in 
May 2003 due to complications involving heart surgery 
Four months later, [ohnny Cash died tlties with 

diabetes He was 71. 



Nov 18, 2005 marks Ihe release of the lames Mangold 
directed biopic, "Walk the Line ". starring |oaquin Phoe- 
nix (Johnny Cash) and Reese Wilherspoou tjune Carter). < 
Cash has left a lasting legacy that is perhap t best summed 
up by long-time friend Bob Dylan; "In plain terms, John- 
ny was and is the North Star yon COUtd guide your ship 
by him - the greatest of the greats then and now" II- 
hoping his star won't burn out any lime soon 

Sourctt: www.aHimnlccom and wwyn.wiliipedh. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



By Mark Sibilla 
KANSAS STATE tOlllGi**! 



Performing in an outfit of all black, including a long, black, knee-^j ( 
length coat, Johnny Cash is one of the most imposing yet iconia 
artists in music history, and rightfully so. He is one of the few mu4JI 
sical artists with an influence that spans genres and generations. Combin-A^ 
ing Ihe ragged honesty of folk, the rebellious nature of rock and roll, and 
the worldly experience of the country singer, Cash created his own musi- 
cal style and image that has lasted long after his death in 2003. 



Cash joined Ihe Air Force during the outbreak of the Korean 
War While in the Air Force, Cash bought a guitar and taught him- 
self how to plaj 

He left the Air force in 1954. moved to Memphis, Tenn , and 
married Vivian Ltberto 

During this lime, Cash landed an audition with Sam Phillips, 
head oi Sun Record*. C ash was initially rejected because he had a 
desire to be a gospel ringer but was told by Phillips to "go home 
and sin, then come hack with a song I can sell" 

It returned With ihe single "Hey Porter." He was imme- 
dial d and t ry Cry Cry/Hey Porter" became his debut 

single with Sun Records 




* 



Page 7 



MOVIES 

■ Timet Ht today through Sunday. 

■ M timet art p.m. unless ether 



Columnist thankful for readers, snow days, Chuck Norris 



Ask the 




year 



; 



MATT 
PETERWORTN 




Fifth Year, Thanksgiving is 
coming up. What are you 
thankful for? 

I am thankful for my loyal 
readers. I know I've managed 
to piss off a few people, includ- 
ed but not limited to my editor 
in-chief and all Republicans, 
Put lodging from feedback 
which I get on campus, a lot o I 
you read and enjoy my weekly 
column and i am sincerely 
grateful that you do. 

I am thankful for President 
Wefald canceling school due to 
snow on several occasions dur- 
ing my time here. My brother 
went here for seven years dur- 
ing the 1990s and he never had 
a snow day once. 

President Wefald, I know 



the walk from your residence 
to Anderson Hall can be very 
treacherous with snow, so don't 
ever be reluctant in closing the 
campus. I'm only thinking of 
your safety, 

I am thankful for the ran- 
dom Chuck Norris fact genera- 
tor on the Internet I've set this 
site as my homepage and I've 
never had a fact repeated yet. 
In fact, Chuck Norris is first on 
a short list of people to replace 
Bill Snyder as K-Slate's football 
coach. 

I am thankful for condoms. 
Not that anyone has ever had 
sex with me or will ever have 
sex with me, it's just nice to 
know that there is protection 
out there. 1 take one with me 
wherever i go. 



I am thankful for the com- 
pact disc "Yanni Live at the 

totis," Modern-day classi- 
cal composers are few and far 
between Yanni's music is both 
easy to listen to and very uplift- 
ing There's never a bad lime to 
listen U> Yanni. either, not even 
when you're trying to entertain 
a young woman at your place 

I am thankful for Classic 
Wine and Spirits nut near Tar- 
get. 

A30-pack uf Miller High 
Life is only $10 85 At 36 cents 
per can, that's almost as cheap 
as Coke at 25 cents per can. 
Why drink soda at all ? Just 
start drinking beer instead, as- 
suming you're 2 1, of course At 
this price, there's DO reason to 
not have your fridge half-full of 



High Life all the time, halt In . 
case you want to get drunk on 
a Wednesday night and watch 
"High Fidelity" 

And lastly, I am especially 
thankful for graduating in May. 
it has been a long five years, 
with many ups and down, 
many roommates, many C's 
I hat should have been D's and 
many B's that should have been 
As. 

All in all, I have been happy 
with my lime here at K-State 
and am thankful for being able 
to spend time with some of my 
dearest friends 



Matt PtttrwHth b i fifth y*ar ttnto< In 
ankfocturel tnfHwtring. You can m l 

HsjPHI i 



' ■ tftMtet times that ant playing 
Saturday and Sunday only 




"Walk the line" PG 13 
1:15, 4 10, 7 05. 10:00 

Harry Potter and the Goblet of 
Fire' PG- 1 3 
1 2: JO, 1; JO, 3 45, 4:50, 7:00, 8: 10, 10: IS 





1 


-^ 


^2? 




jMtnr\t< 



"Get Rich or Die Trying 
1:00, 4:00, 7:00,9:50 

thicken little"'. 
12:50, J:00, 5:00, 7:35, 9:35 

"Jarhead'R 

1-15,4:10,7:20,10:05 

•Saw 2" R 

1:10,3:20,530,7:40,9:55 

The Legend of Zorro'PG 

12:40,4:00.7:10,10:05 

"Prime" PG- 13 
1:50, 4:45. 7:10,9:55 




. 



"Dreamer" PG 

1:40, 4:20, 7:25,9:50 

IlLubethtown'PG-U 

1:20,4:05,715.10:00 

"Zathura'PG 

1:00,3:15,5:30,7 45,10:00 



MTV'S TRL 
TOP 10 




. 1 ^Clirteon"6>cauMofyou- 

2 fall Out Boy 'Dance, Dance" 
'"* i Marian Carey "Don't forget About Us" 
. 4 Wac» eyed Peas 'My Humps" 
5 ShaMra'Dwniother" 
6. Madonna "Hunt) Up" 
7 Green Day "Wake Me Up When 
September Endi" 
8. Simple Plan "Crazy ILK*)" 
9 Lindsay Lohan "Confessions Of A 
Broken Heart (Daughter To father)" 
10. The Click five 'Catch Your Wave" 



MTV 






w»» 



• . -.-- . .. 



PageS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



Looking to listen 



Junior perseveres in spite 
of hearing impairment 



By Adam Hanks 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

When Miranda Carrell goes 
lu class the rarely pays attention 
to the instructor. She comes in, 
sits down and never listens to a 
word of the lecture. 

That's because Carrel I is 
deaf. 

She spends most of her class 
time watching Natalie Beharry 
interpret the entire lecture 

As Carrell takes notes in In- 
troduction to Moral Philosophy, 
Beharry, a certified sign lan- 
guage interpreter with Disability 
Support Services, deciphers the 
lecture into sign language - from 
sound to sight 

Although it may seem foreign 
to students who are not hearing- 
impaired, Carrell, junior in his- 
tory, said communicating using 
her hands and lips instead of her 
voice is natural 

"1 started learning not too 
long after 1 lost my hearing," 
said Carrell. who can speak de- 
spite not being able to hear. "I 
was learning sign language at the 
same time I was learning lan- 
guage, so it wasn t hard for me." 

Carre II 's hearing loss was 
caused by a case of meningitis 
when she was four years old. 

"I don't have any clear 
memories of being able to hear 
normally," she said "1 was too 
young" 

CarrelTs first years in school 
in Wichita were spent in an en- 
vironment where all the students 
were deaf From there, she was 
able to make the transition into 
a traditional classroom 

"At first, I was in a special 
classroom where all the teach- 
ers knew sign language, and all 
the students were deaf," she said 
"Then I moved to a class that 
was half and half Finally, I went 
into a mainstream classroom" 

After graduating from Wichita 
High School Southeast, Carrell 
said she did not have any second 
thoughts about going off to col- 
lege 

"It wasn't a hard decision," 
she said. "I knew that they would 
provide an interpreter for me. 



and I always knew that 
going to college would be 
something I would do" 

With the aid of a co- 
chlear implant and her 
ability to read lips, Car- 
rell can make it through 
a basic conversation 
with someone who does 
not know sign language 
However, she said she 
still needs an interpreter 
for class. 

"Even if 1 can under- 
stand the instructor, they 
may not be looking at 
me or they may be mum 
bling," she said "Factor 
into that group discus- 
sions, and it gets hard. An 
interpreter allows me to 
understand what's being 
said at all times." 

K-State's Disability 
Support Services provides 
three full-time interpret 
ers for the seven hear- 
ing-impaired students on 
campus, said Gretchen 
Holdcn, director of Dis- 
ability Support Services. 

"We provide them 
with sign language interpreters 
for all of their classes and any 
activity on campus that's relat- 
ed," H olden said "Any disability 
that impacts a student's ability to 
do well in school, we are going 
to provide an accommodation of 
some kind or another if we are 
requested to do so." 

The service allows students 
to go to college who would have 
never had the chance 20 years 
ago, she said 

"Twenty years ago if you were 
blind, and you came up here, 
you had better bring your moth- 
er with you to read the hooks 
to you," Holden said. "But now, 
times have changed dramatical- 
ly'* 

Beharry has been working for 
Disability Student Services for 
the past 20 years - 10 years as a 
freelancer and 10 years as a full- 
time employee 

"I'm a child of deaf adults, so 
I grew up with sign language," 
she said. "I would be considered 
bilingual, basically." 




Miranda Car- 
rell, junior in 
history, uses 
a telecom- 
munication 
device for the 
deaf to talk on 
the phone. For 
class lectures, 
Carrell uses a 
sign language 
interpreter. 

Steven Doll 

LCIUG1AN 



K-State to partner 2 
with school in Beijing 



Even though Beharry grew 
up with sign language in her lile. 
she said she still has lo think 
about what she is doing 

"It's my brain that gets tired 
before my hands get tired," Be- 
harry said "When you are inter- 
preting you have to pay attention 
to everything that's being said 
It's definitely a process you run e 
to go through. Changing one 
language to another is work" 

Even though she has grown 
up deaf, Carrell said some every- 
day situations are still difficult 

"Sometimes I feel left out," 
she said "Sometimes I feel like 
all eyes are on me when 1 walk 
into a classroom with an inter- 
preter. But I've got to move past 
that I have to brush it off" 

Despite the difficulties, Car 
rell said there are some advan- 
tages to being deaf 

"When the girls are scream 
ing and being loud, I can just 
tum my implant off and not hew 
what they are saying," she said. 

Hut Carrell's impairment 



doesn't stop her from enjoying 

life 

"I am absolutely oba 

wnh L'2," she said "I saw them 
in concert last semester I can t 
descrihe il \n one JJVM S 
cert like U2" 

Even though she lias never 
paid attention to a pro lessor in 
lecture, she continues lo do well 
in school. Along with history and 
hoDog) dames, Carrell has 
luken two semesters of Prwich 

"It's difficult," she said, "but 
tt'S do able." 

I e; isons Carrell 

k successful is because 
in- support t>l hei pan 

who ti,i, ,jgn language 

ound (heir daugh 
tar i have 

always bi fot her, she 

said, and have always em 

aged her. 

Tin v siil n though I 

il them \ 
■i think ihai 
great part of why I am as sin 

cesshil ;is i 



By Abby Brownback 

KANSAS SMII (Oil EGIAN 

K-State has formally agreed 
to an academic partnership with 
Beijing's Capital University of 
Economies and Business 

The agreement between the 
two universities will allow Capi 
tal University students to earn a 
K-State degree in interdisciplin- 
ary social science beginning in 
fall 2006 

The students will lake about 
90 credit hours at Capital I'ni 
versily and transfer I In «C credits 
lo K State The students will fin- 
ish their degrees with 30 K-State 
lit hours through distance 
education, said Betty Stevens, 
associak* vice provost lor infor- 
mation technology partnerships 
and associate Jean ot the Divi- 
sion o( Continuing Education. 

In effect, the) won't be any 
different from other students; 
Stevens said 

However, K .culty 

will review the Capital Univer 

sily classes to ensure they 10 

K State transfer criteria, Stevens 
said If necessary, Capital Uni- 
versity faculty can adjust their 
e lasses to meet the criteria 

An interdisciplinary social 
science degree is offered both on 
campus and online to K-State 
students It is one of the mod 
popular ma|<irs in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, said Alison 
Wheat lev. assistant dean ol - 
College of Altl and Slid. 

\ social science majoi will 
seteel lourses thai create a the 



matic emphasis." she said ^,. 

The degree requires aHfast 

15 hours at the 500-lewPor 

and at least threelSed- 

its in four different discifjIStes, 

Wbeatley said. 

The agreement does not only 
benefit Capital University .stu- 
dents, hut also K-Stale students, 
Whe alley said. 

"It will provide our students 
who are in distance education 
classes Hie opportunity to.be in 
classes with international tslu- 
dentS," she said. 

• Elizabeth Unger, vice pro- 
i i it academic services and 
technology, said she dodS not 
anticipate a large class for the 
program's first year. She said 
the program may have from 40 
to 100 stud en is 

"It's an international experi- 
ence for our students and our 
faculty," Unger said. 

When officials from the Chi- 
nese university visited K-State 
teal week In lour (he campus 
and meet with faculty, they also 
discussed offering a possible 
master's degree in engineering, 
said Richard Hayter, associate 
dean for external affairs f< ir the 
College of Engineering 

K Stale now has 163' slu 
dents enrolled in six Web based 
graduate degrees in engineering: 
civil, mechanical, software, elec- 
trical and chemical engineering 
and engineering management 

"We can deliver to China 
jiisi as well us we can deliver to 
Ibpeka, electronically," H 
said 



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page 9 





sponsors Breadbasket with event 



Steven Doll | (OlltGIAtt 
Nicholas Whitney, freshman in environmental design, lines up his shot 
while playing pool Thursday night in the K State Student Union. 



By Kaley Lyon 

KANSAS SIMf COLUGIAN 

Students gathered at the 
K Stale Student Union Thurs- 
day night for Ire* bowling, 
bod and a dunce in win door 
prises 

I hese sett* (ties were part of 
Wildest Information Network's 
find evenl 

WIN is u student organize 
lion that launched ha Wfeb site in 
lanuary 2(Wi 



"I know that on Thursday 

nights students like to lie active, 
but some students don't go out, 
or ean't get into the ban," Man 
dy Smiib, junior in construction 
st ience and management said 
"This is kind of an alternative 
activity, and we thought it would 
be really run " 

Students were encouraged to 
bring canned goods to benefit 
the Flint Hills Breadbasket 

The number rd chances ,< 

student had to win a door prize 



depended on how many canned 
Is the student donated stu- 
dents » bo did not bring a canned 
good could register otiiv once 

■ Ut ru ■tied a way to kind (if 

promote oui Web site, and i was 
down in the Union playras. pool 
and saw an advertiscmenl that 

you could rent the Union," 1 an 

ren Tice sophomore in English 
said, i thought it would be real- 
ly cool to do something like this 
And since it's around Thanksgiv- 
ing, l thought ii would be reall) 



cool to ask lor donations from 
students." 

WIN, sponsored by Student 

Goveminfi \8sociation, has 12 
employees and about 20 

voluriteet employees 

win recommends students 

WflO visit the Web site sign up 
as registered users, because tltey 
will Rave access to more infur 

maiioii, Tice said. 

Students interested in work- 
ing for win ,.in check the Web 

site tor stall m«tinj dales 



Prescription drug ads Scottish author visits Manhattan Public Library 



raise awareness, use 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS MIL COLltGIAN 

"Are you lonely"? Do you of 
ten feel sad? Do you ever feel 
like you're on pause, while the 
world's still going on around 
you 7 If the answer is yes, then 
you might want to consult your 
doctor about depression" 

It is increasingly common to 
see advertisements, sueli as this 
one for an anti-depressant, on 
television and on the radio, ni 
magazines and newspapers and 
other forms of media 

The conventional use ol ine 
dicinal advertisements, promoting 
disorders tike depression, erectile 
dysfunction and bladder-control 
problems, has brought with it a 
debate about the advertising in- 
dustry's ethical standards 

Sherry Denton, Lafene Health 
Center counselor, specializes in 
treating depression She said she 
thinks prescription drug advertjs- 
ing "can be beneficial for those un 
aware of possible treatments, but 
Benton also said pharmaceutical 
companies which fund the ma- 
jority ol anti-depressant advertis- 
ing - don't provide | wide ruigp 
Of Solutions for patients 

"1 think it's good (or people 
to have information for all treat 
ment options," Benton said 'but 
1 think too much advertising fa 
cuscs on drug solutions" 

Benton, who had a 
published by the American I 
etiological Association in 200'i 

that focused on nil lege COUI 
ing center client problems, said 
other methods can be as effective 
an medication for those suffering 
from mild depression 

"There is very good research 
dial hard aerobic exercise (or 50 
minutes a day, five days a week, 
works as well as Prozac for mild 
depression." Benton said "There 
is also verv good evidence that 
you prevent sub.sei|Uttit relapse i( 
you do talk therapy" 

Larry MoeJIer, Lafene physi- 
cian, treats patknti with depres- 
sion and anxiety He approai 
prescript^ in drug advertising 
differently than Benton, He 



such advertisements serve as a 
red flag for those afllicted to go 
si 1 1 a doctor, 

The general population is 
more aware, (doctors) are more 
aware, and that's a safe, effective 

combination," Mueller said, "I 
When in doubt, cheek it out' 
People are realizing they're not 
crazy and not abnormal. 

While il may seem then 
mote people «hu suffer from 
formerly taboo disorders like de 

pression. Rfutieta Bit lys 

function, in reality, numbers have 
nut increased 

\cb ertisements are one mech- 
anism thai ere, ili a BOON com 
Editable environment (or people 
tO open up about previously un- 
spoken issues, Mueller said 

"I think It's beneficial," he said 
ot medicine and advertising ■ 
as long as you buddy up to yi iur 
professional to figure things out" 

Occasionally, Mueller does 

i ihdivulu i re not sul 

fcring from any disorder but want 
medicine or are seeking medi 

fur ret [nil poses 

there are some who don't have 
problems thai a all the 

lusts they get in their b.m 
Mueller said "I feel safe because I 
have doclor-patien hips 

and make my clients COTTM tacl 
and see me weekly Most of the 
I 
Hyun Srung |in, assistant 
'i "I journalism recently D 
study examining die effects i 

prescrip 
lion daig advertising for en 
dysfunction The results revealed 
thai people whu were frequently 
subjected to advertisements lor 

iile dysfunction medicati 
like Viagra were more tflcel 
show acceptance n hize 

with (host who have ED 

Pet ipk with problems want to 
hide, hut when they real 

■ ion peopli 
their ittne i Ihej set no hum 
in opening up." [in said "I'm nut 
total)) supporting DTX advertis- 
ing, hut the n aws itself 
Vdvertisinji has informati 
value" 



By Logan C.Adams 
KANSAS STWt COllffiAH 

More than 200 people 
crowded into the Manhattan 
Library to -isiting 

;i author Thursday eve- 
ning 

author, Debi Ollori, was 
St the library, 629 I'oyniz Ave., 
tO read her book No Matter 
What' ,i Storj about B l 
foxes and unconditional love 

she , ante as .1 part ol Kansas 
ibrarj 

of Kansas project 

Gliori will be reading her 

in Kansas City Kan , 

nee and Hiawatha, Kan , 

umorrow 

( lov. Kathleen Sebelius tvill 

iding tin book at focal 

libran, 

■ "ing to s rile, esc from the 
library 

Before tht reading b 
Gliori signed copies of her 
while the audience filed 

mio the room |ennlfct Adams, 
manager for the 
library logjve 

instructions to the audient 
fore introducing <;tturi. 

it on 

your bottoms, so ih 

can ■• - tid through the 

stuffed creature u The 

kids responded weakly that the) 
would, but lp and 

walked around durin 
apologized lor tin sickness she 

la with In: ii cold she 



From Gliori's "Where Did 
That Baby Come From?" 

Where did this h.iby come front? 
Did you ^K limit nl the \e«? 
It doe-in't swim, irt got no fins. 
Come on, let's set it free. 

said she received from one of 
her live children before leaving 

St otl.md 

I III g '■■ said llll 

person daughter, and 

acted out a loud sneeze between 

■miss von. and here's a 
Ljttk ilmia 1,0 take with you!" 

GUorj started by drawi 
picture of a fox on a large pad 1 ,t 
papei on stage Gliori illustrat 

'.', , II .is wrote 'No Man, 1 

What," along unh several 
children's books. 

1 be book is about a pair of 
foxes: Small, a child, and Large, 
the older caregiver In the Story, 
; happens upon a "grim and 
grumpy' small, who believes \f 

■ not be loved 

said the names come 

I herseU and one ol het 
children, who call each other 
II and "Li 
■11 stopped i:i ■ 

and talked about tl 

iked questions of the 

youn he front. 

What Jo you do v 

■•un and grumpy " she 

s.ud ( hn child's answer sur- 
1 het 

Hn people." she 1 
ing M\i.\ laughing Shi 

i parent Ii 




Calrirm Rflwion j Oil ItbiAN 

Debi Gliori, a Scottish author reads her book, "No Matter What/Thurs- 
day evening at the Manhattan Public Library. Gliori signed autographs 
and read to a crowd of 300. 



the star; prugrt 

small iron 1 his 
«l I he young 

; kivi him 
ii he a 

among other things At tie 

be loved "ni 

■ if.. Gliori 

had lime for onlv one HUM 

That If a by 
t on ii 

lli the 
teu sibling, and 
■ ring d In , could 

id it hack." 

After tin 

I 

able 1 
\,i Mattel 'A h it in Iht ir waj 
out I 1 paid for in the 



Manha tt u 1 ibn i< Vssoeiation, 

null .ilso 

d day 

care ceil 

1 1 and 
adults al 1 and illus- 

trating bit 

i Michaels 
really 
read 
nil) 

brought 
his djiuglt- 

on 1 Itj to set Glio 

n 

Tht d like stellar 

children.' he said l enjoyed 

joyed listening to licr' 



REMINDER TO 



K-STATE CONNECTION CELL PHONI 
SUBSCRIBERS 



I. arc OT) the K-St.ilc I oc.il I'l.n aid le.uc llic Kansas 

area 0V« Thanksgiving, your in mule A ilj II you use 

yout phone outside of the Kansas area, you «tll mcui 1 
•es 

Please call our ofllo dill it so .Miiional 

information. 



— LOVE- 

Advertising 7 

Work for the Spring 2006 Collegian ^^ 

Advertising Staff Positions 

• Account Representatives 

Applications due 
3 p.m. Nov. 22 



Pick up an application & job description 

in Kcdiic 103. 




Hfe 



r e/ 



%i 







V 



( mini mil |< iiii us 
hiiiii 7 lO 'I (Ml 
Friday, Nmrniini 

IHlli in l,cl|. 
Xclrlitan 5(0 years 

ot Inning. selliiu». C^ 

jiDtl cm liattgiiig ^J 

tjonks in AjoncviJlc. ^r^ 

rl'jiii a hn n< Is, 
Sod, iiiiisic, and |^] 
.ii .mi entire (/} 

jjtveitloiy as a Ing ^J 

iiwnk Mui for your ^^^ 

iin.igi llielll ^^ 

«wl stiptKirt a \ 

7ft) N. Manhatian ^^ 



W./J.'KCWfll 



- 



ADVERTISE 




Saturday, November 19th 
10:00 am to 3:00 pm 

Open to all KSU Students 

KSU THEATRE SPRING PRODUCTIONS 
"The Underpants" by Steve Martin 

"Metamorphoses" 
by Mary Zimmerman 

"The Complete Works ot 
William Shakespeare Abridged" 

Dimly Percieved Threats to the System" 



KIM 



Call backs 
Monday at 6:00 pm 

No Preparation Necessary 

Reading scripts availabe in 129 Nichols Halt 

Question: Call 532 6875 



532-6560 

Cdli.ECttAN 



0V Nate Bagby & Seasonal Labor 

-Oustin Evans 

The Good time Bam 




Shiner bock 
bottles 




SALDDW 



flUDITIOnS 

7 P.H. DEC. 1ST 

FLINT HILLS ROOM 

2ND R.0OR ■ K STATE STUDENT UNION 















Page iu 



KANbM^i b> I At L v-ULLtAjiMN 



rnaay, nov. to, .*uu;> 



Cost of toilet paper I Student releases CD about time crunch 



can add up quickly 




Mikey 

Needleman, 

junior in 

psycho I 

ogy, plays 

the guitar 

during one 

of his songs 

Thursday 

evening 

at Pat's 

Blue Rib'n 

Barbecue in 

Aggieville. 

Christopher 

Hancwlnckel 

COIUblAN 



Photo Illustration by Chmtoph«f Hantwlntkcl | [01! (GIAN 



By Lacey 0. Mackey 

■MU 

i] commodl 
i -I up quickly, ."ii least 
■ .>use 

"In i In him- it!' fruit ^irls wi 

i lot," Dudley, junior in 
medicine and biol- 
sald 

ml her roi 
male tl 24 rolls even 

■ i week Bui in them, loilei paper 
ipful in nn >n ways iban one 
■ rj {or dinting, ■ 
ource, and 
i get into the 
paper and shred it," Dudley 
possibilities.' 
Dudley does not like K-Staies 

■ l|)CI 

"It would be saving more mm 
nvi ply," Dudley said. 
he ili'-jx.-nstT is bro- 
gei one * 
sting." 
|ol director of facili- 

I i id .i lot of 

iritiea lake rolls 

Jly during 

nivereit) Hon na and 

Hie 

p 

• i .1 he 

of paper 

who papered it. 



,md we went to the fraternity, and 
they admitted to Betting it on cant' 

pus,' Woods said "We certainly 
charged them (or it, but they paid 
l<>i it' 

While many complain about 

I be type of tuilet paper K-State 

uses, Win ids said the thin sheets 

arc- economical and mean more 

I on a roll 

K.illn A/aiii. custodial man 
nl bousing and dining services. 
said each building orders a cer- 
tain number of 24-roll cases each 
week 

Azain said the number of cases 
vanes for each ball While West 
Kali usually orders 12 cases every 
two weeks tioodnow Hall orders 
10 cases each week 

Each dispenser in a stall holds 
two double rolls of toilet paper, 
vcb id i can lake care of a floor for 
I tire weekend 

When we bad single rolls we 
bad to leave several rolls for the 
students over the weekend,'' Azain 
said 

For residence halls with suites, 
are kepi on hand (or sludenis 
who want them, Azain said, but 
sludenis huy (heir own 

In the past, floors have had 

era] tolls taken al a time, hui Azain 
said lost toilet paper rolls don't drs- 
■ as often 

W'c ve had a whole floor*! pa 
per disappear at one time, but the 
dispensers luck now," she said 
"Wc used to set the rolls out, but it 

i near as much." 




By Megan Green 

KMMSSTMKQIIEGIAN 

Mikey Needleman can tell 
you what it's like to reli 
compact disc 

Needleman, senior in pej| 
cholugy, released his CD. Am t 
Got No Time" 

"It's basically about run 
ning late, not having any time," 
Needleman said. "1 think 
of people can connect with it in 
a lot of ways" 

His musk has been 
pared to the acoustical ve 
of Vertical Horizon or 
Hazel, with edgier rhythms, In 
cubus and John Mayer 

Needleman said his career 
began when his father gave him 
his first guitar in fifth grade, 

'After that 1 started p. 
up other instruments, such as 
the drums, bass, keyboard and 
percussion and learning to plav 
them," be said, '1 have a pmb- 
lem - if there is an insti 
in the room, 1 will try to leam 
bow in plav it 

Needleman said he j >li 
all the instruments on his CO 

He said it took him more 



than Bw years to complete the 
album because he kept adding 
to it, but now that ii is complete, 
he is working on another CO 

"I have a lot more inspi- 
ration,'' he said "I'm playing 

around mure and getting a feel 
for what people like 

Needleman s a regular guest 
a I foe's Tap Room on Fridays 
Mi- friend, Spencer Hoik 
omore m hotel and i 
ni management said 

Needleman enjoys bis per- 
formances 

the crowd really 
into it and he has a Ion lime 
up there," Hoik said "lis re 
ally fun to see him He has a 
talent" 

the release dJ 

Needleman s i id he- 

been getting leedback 
from people and a belter idea 
of w i ke He said he 

has gotten such a good re- 
sponse thai In srries 
and flyers with bun be 
isk when 
i >s and b 
he pi He even has 
on Pacehook com 
"I always play his CDs for 



1 ody," said Alissa Millard, 

sophomore in open option and 

founder of the Facebookcom 

group, "its awesome and evcry- 

boLild listen to it" 

Needleman said he writes 
bis songs about things that have 
happened to him or thin 
looks forward to experiencing. 

"I might wrilt i love 
but it's no) about a person I 



know," he said, "It might be 
about a person I don't even 
know yet, but am looking for 

ward to knowing." 

dleman said be enjoys 
playmg for Otfafln 

"I love playing music for pcx i 
pie," be said, "1 think the coolest 
thing is when I am singing one 
of my songs on stage and people 
are singing with me" 



N&VL 




1204 Moro 539-8910 




for your 



S^toS great prfces! 



GET IN ON THE ACTION 

Saturday 11/19, 9am - 1pm in Parking Lot 9 



TAILGATE 




Visit WWW.TML0A7E411.CaM * Yvur Tailga ting Authority ! 



FOX 



^ 




MI !I1 WCokmanH 
mission 










CLASSIFIEDS 



Friday, Nov. 18, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To place an adverts mentcaH 



ie 1 1 



• I I I _!_ I I IIM_|| || ■ • J I II 

■l> :: l 1 'J is 'J ' ■ ■ 

LET'S RENT 



110' 
For Rent- 
Apt. 
Unfurnished 

820 COLORADO 
men! efficiency 420 square 
leer Pa Ho I priced yard 
lighted parking Shared utilll- 
ifc* NO PETS. January 
■ i>75 (785)776-8548. 

A LARGE one-bedroom 
Available January 1 Glosp 
to campus Washer.' dryer 
1704 Fairvie* (785)3t7 

mi 

UYE ONI V half block from 
campus and walk lo class 
fj\ige one bedroom base- 
man/ apattmenl £400 plus 
electric i.i il Mire utilities 
paid) Available now vtllh 
short leim tease f 
Property Management 

..-t'L',-.-.N nhh'i 

NEW TWO-BEDROOM du 

plek. close to uiimpus. ..ii 1, 
appliances lurnished No 
■■is (/85)£>39 
1975 (7851313 8296 

THREE-BEDROOMS 

AVAILABLE now Close lo 

Water/ Hash paid 

Central air coin-opeialed 

(786)537-7810, 

(785 1 S3 7- 22bh 

ONE BEDROOMS $370 
$490 three- bed rooms 

1700 W2S (785)537-7701 



NEW TWO- BEDROOM 

ground Itoor apartment to 
older home, moots all co- 
* appliances includ- 
ing dishwasher VeT) 
515 Bluemonl available 
January, no pots, laundry in 
eluded, $620 plus utilities. 
(785)313-0462, leave mes- 
tapa 

TWO-MDHOOM OUHIEX 

s now lor sh 
lease. Small pets okay 
S550, F mora Id Property 
.■•merit (785)556- 
6899 



For Rent- 
Houses 

EVERVTHING NEW Dm* 
bedroom hvo bath Iioiisp 
with Baraga WH ol cam- 
pus Available soon Emer- 
ald Property Management 
1785)556-6899 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
bath duplex One- half mile 
Irom campus Washer/ dryer 
included Single property 
owner No puts No smok 
nxj 1410 Houston 
Twu |7B5)776-9260. 

LOOK BRAND New 
House 722 Osage Four 
bedroom, two balh. washer.' 
dryer, rent,' lease/ pels ne- 
gotlahl, 1 28 1 <•■■ 

(785)776-9124 



FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 

balh, two blocks from cam 
jiu , Washer/ dryer hook- 
ups Deck with gni. 
neighborhood nice yard, 
nice house S14O0/ month 
Available im media ii' 
(820)792-1033 or mataner- 
erUaliSC yahoo com 

HAVE YOUR own balh 
room- Four -bedroom, four 
bath Walk in closets 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
Close lo Agglcvllle and cam 
iow Emerald 
I f Management 
(785)556-6899. 

THREE BEDROOM 
THREE blocks south ol Ag- 
giovillo Spacious, washer' 
dryer, stove, retrlgeralor 
cenlrai air. S675. (785)537- 
9425 0( (785)532-4424. 



Roommate 
Wanted 

BEDROOM AVAILABLE 
January 1. Beautiful three 
bedroom, two balh house 
riea' Westloop No deposit 
Furnished i! need- 
ed (785)587-9997 

JANUARY- AUGUST 

Three- bed room, I2» 
one Ihird utilities Call Phillip 
(913)302-0402 



Roommates needed lor 
lour -bedroom next to cam- 
pui. Two bath, washer/ dry- 
er dishwasher No pnls 
1785)537-7050 



Subitum 



FEMALE SUBIEASER 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please con lad (785)556- 
0169 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Available Immedi- 
ately. 1006 Laramie 5300/ 

month pins one-try 
ies (913)775 0327 

FEMALE c .Ni*l f am li 

wanted' 5230.' month Four 
bedroom house i-ibki lo 
campus. Pete, allowed 
Wither/ dryer. Ghelsoa 
(314)860 1342 

ROOMMATES MALE or 

female pot;, okay i 
gotiaole Washer/ dryer 
large yard one third ullltlies 
Call James (785)31 7-6006 

SPRING SEMESTER sut> 
teaaerls) needed Nice 
dean apartment Close to 
campus and 
Cheap t»IK Nc deposit 
Discounted rent: 5225/ 
month Call (785)202-0678 
Available December 




1451 

Roommate 
Wanted 

FEMALE FOR January- 
May Two-bedroom house, 
close to campus. S275' 
monlh plus ulilities Washer/ 
dryer Call Megan ( 785)906- 
0131 

FEMAIE ROOMMATE 

needed Available Decem- 
ber 15 January lo May 
1290/ month Pels allowed 
615 Thurston Call 

(785)341-1073 

FEMALE HOOMMATE 

wanled to share two bed 
room apartment $280/ 
month, split electric and ca- 
ble bin Call Megan at 
(402)750-0570 

I- E MALE ROOMMATE 

wanled Three bedroom 
apartment hall block ham 
campus $250/ month plus 
one -third utilities Call 
1785)34." 

FEMALE ROOMMATE No 
smoking T wu ■ hedroo m 

apartmenl GlDM tQ C#Jn> 

pus Oti afi i 
Washer/ dryer Available im 
■J1481-9B37 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
three bedroom houaa tei 
spring setnesler flew $320 
plus utilities Very nice 
146 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 

needed Fun. out-going, no 
(wis Two-bedrooms availa- 
ble. $300' each (913)486- 
2748 

LOOKING FOR a roommate 
lor a four-bedroom 
Available as soon as possi- 
ble 1112 Van- 
(785)443-3306 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
-,. Scoll 



ROOMMATE 



WANTED 



032 



Shout 
Outs 

The Collegian reserves 
the righl to edit or reject 
ad copy First or last 
names can be accepted In 
ad copy Photo ID re- 
quired it placement Ads 
can be placed in 103 Ked- 
fte Hell. 52 tor up to 20 
words 



I LOVE Twiggy u 



-tlfcTGH A Fly an lorover 
you anjii -'I's say. 

., Figure It out so I 
can gel some sleep. 

-.uA'.ll r.MVL.'l h will be 

FACEBOOK HAS turned in- 
to a natural di . 

FOUND YESTERDAY by 
I ii '■! awer two 

' Hall to 

HANG LIP your cell 
and DRIVE or pay alien 
lion 



have a greal weekend 1 



HEV RICK I 

m is leftover ol you 

youateHOTi'i 

JUST QUIT smokirn 

tnd have a BBG 
Drinks go better with BBQ 

THE WEATHFR m 
quickly. I rlon l Ih 
| 
but there are 
itiH oul there 

WHERE IS the party this 

■ • ■' I bet a) 
'imi,:..' 



without add- 
ng a cnii phone eg ow m • 

gs 

WALTERS. YOU know ,' 
you never toot 

find Vgur secret edi 

"■s Clue 



SUBLC-' 
tourbedi 

I Begins 
$275 monlhly Cable trash 
dryer tui 
"50-65*3 

walk iu otas 

r -. I 

|78S|539-1554 



150 



Sublease 



000 

I built t ut 



01D 



Announcements 



"LEARN TO FLY" 

Slflg Club has five atr- 
nes and lowest rates 
Oe.ll 1-85)776-1744 

www ksu adu 



trrryi i' j goyja.com 

QUT Manhattan'*, 
rejetaurant and bar website 
Lots at specials, entertain 
rrjanl l-ahtrta, and gill certili 



1051 

For Rent- 
Apts Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account of race. 
sea, familial s talus, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age, color, national 
origin or ancestry. Viola- 
tions should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources a I City Hall 
|785|587 2440 

1101 
For Rent 
Apt. 
Unfurnished 



1101 
For f ' 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

AVAILABLE SOON 1019 
* 2 Three-bed- 
i Ho plus day room 
Screen.-' I KHch 

en appliances $695 On so 
to downtown City Park and 
Aogievillo (705)34 1 



NICE TWO BEDROOM 
walking * 

pus Water are I I rash paid 
Lease starts Januai ) 

85)672- 



ONC BEDROOM APART 
ME NTS. available) now and 
in January Ottering, semes- 
ter lea-. MOI at 
17*5)778-38 u 



NOW LEASING 



I <edroom 
duplexes Walk to class. No 

ing no 
pels (785(539 1554 



■ 
• Pehblubrook 



laundry tjc 


Ihteo-bedroom 

■ washer 
.•or and 

■ 



Lost and Found 



Lost and found ode can be 

placed tree for three days 



030 I 



i \v--.l a Ni.it'J 



We require a term of pic- 
ture ID (KSU, drivers Ii 
cense or other) when piec- 
ing a poet a note. 



uw 

I b^uaiog/ 



WILDCAT 5370064 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

S37-2332 



Anderson Village 

1 BD 1BA 
1460 tor January 



15Q7Poyim #1 

2 BD O S600 

NEW carpet & paint 

Gas & water paid 

1 509 Poynt/. 
t LG BOO 1525 

Washer & Dryer 
ALL utilities PAID 



MONTH MONTH Leases 
Two-bedroom, $520. Three- 
bedroom. $620 1510 Col 
lege Ave (765)537-2096 



GREAT DEAL' Studio apart- 
ment available January t 
Five or seven month lease 
1340, all utilities paid 
(785)41045361 or (785)341 
47S4 

JANUARY LEASE Two" 
bedroom, two balh apart 
men I Brand new great lo- 
cation Two block 
campus One block Irom Ag- 
gie ville All appliances in 
eluding washer/ dryer 
(785)317-5326 or (316)640 
1865 

NEWLY REMODEL ED Iwo- 
totdroom apartments All 
ulililies paid 1 Available in 
December and January, ol 
taring semester leases Call 
MDI an 735)776-3804 

ONE AND two bedrooms 
close to campus, central-air, 
parking, laundry (785)539 
5800.(785)537-6017 



120 1 

For Rent 
Houses 



FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 
balhs iwu kitchens, very 
close lo campus | >' 
8628. (785)341 4073 



HOUSES FOR rent Close 
to campus Three 
five-bedroom (8771439- 
40H 



ONE BEDROOM WALK to 
class No smoking, no drink 
ing. no pets (785)539 
1554 




Whether you're buying or selling this fall, you can reach more than 
20,000 students and 5,000 faculty with the Collegian classifieds each day 

Kansas State Collei; ian 

103 Ked/ie 532 6555 



For Sale- 
Houses 



LAKE HOUSE, two stories, 
1,700 square leei Large 
dock and screened porch, 
sand beach, boai ramp. 
great view' $139,500 
(795)4681531 



TWO BEDROOM APART 
MENT $400/ month SI 1026 

From January through May 
II interested, Call (620)719- 
6858 



Office Space 



AGGIEVILLE RETAIL/ Office 
space tor tease Handi-Cor- 
rver Shopping Center Off- 

stiHet parking 1785)539- 
0350 1785)313-2976 



* 



WHEN WE miss Coach, wo 
» Snyder 

l( S365' MONTH University 
UHnk ihc Wagoners win Cr05S|( , p Cabie wm|w , 

dry. One bed- 

room open in two bedroom 

.'109 -5448 

■ - till VATTIER Two bed 
room $550 a month Close 
to campus (9131645 n 

AGGIEVILLE LOFT Lease 

irom January Augut 

Faur- bedroom. More 

<ie» caipel 5350' 
monlh. Moore Property 
Management 1 785153 7- 
,»S 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 

wanled Walking distance to 
Large room $300 
plus one-third utilities Avail 
able January 1 Please call 
(785)640 3288 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
MENT $325/ month, water 
and trash paid Close to 
campus Available January 
egoliabie! Call 
or 
4S 7 333(9 kflu.edu 

ONE BEDROOM CHASE 
Manhattan Apartments 

available January Can 
(785)539-6366 Water/ trash 

'■■wed 

HNF nt-DHOOM $395. ca 
t>ls/ water paid Laundry, 
pool/ hot tub on site Small 
pets Quiet Available now 
i?e5i3753015 

SLIDLEASEFt NEEDED tor 
one room in a three-bed- 
room house on LeGore 
Lane Available at end of 
December until and ot July 
Call (913I208-29B2 

SUBLEASER NOW: 
two bedroom apartment 
Chase Manhattan apart - 
menu Will pay January ram 
if signed by December Call 
i 76518710738, (785)871 
1553 

SUBLEASER NEEOED 
One-bed room apartment 
Available December 12- 
May $490/ month Pets al- 
lowed tor $25/ month Gas 
■ltd «vater paid Laundry fa- 
35)341- 
1939 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Founders Hill, lour-bed- 
room $308 75 a month plus 
Very NIC 
r 1875 or (785(317 
5145 

SUBLEASING A two-bed- 
room close to campus For 
more information call 
(620)276-4940 



00 



JCJDKt 



suS; 



2201 

Weight Loss & / 

Nutrition 



I LOST 55 pounds 
weeks' See piclui, 
read my story online 
www.losewpiglu.fha;. 




310 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
ly the financial potential ot 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad 
vised lo approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau. SOI SE Jefferson, 
Topeka, KS 66607-1190 
1785)2320454 



Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment in any field of 
work oi labor for which 
he/ she is properly quali- 
fied regardless ol race, 
sett, military status, disa- 
bility, religion, age. color. 
national origin or a nee*. 
try. Violations should be 
reported lo the Director ot 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)587-3441. 

'BARTENDING' $300 a flay 
enpenence 

ed Call 1 800-965-6520 e«t 
144 

CATTS GYMNASTICS in 
Wamogo rs pjaerijnr] 
tional and team coaches 
Starling pay 58 00 plus/ hr 
depending on experience 
and availability C , 

")8 il mteresl- 
ed 

CHRISTMAS BREAK spa 
Clot Not going home lot the 
holidays' Earn some money 
& have tun Irom mid De- 
cember to Jan 3rd at the C 

Lazy u Guei! Ranch in m 

When work is fin- 
ished spend a week wilh 
free 'oom and board lo pur- 
sue your lavontD winter octi- 
vites in Grand County Colo 
rado Contact Phil Dwyer al 
i970i 887-3344 or Email 
pdwyflr#cla^y u com 



ECONOMIC DEVELOP- 
MENT Coordinator Full- 
time position available In 
Wabaunsee County Salary 
i inn enpenence For 
complete position descrip- 
tion pliaH contact WCED 
a) |785|765-4655 Applica 
tlon deadline postmarked by 
November 21 Please send 
cove' i«rt*r and resume to 
WCED. PO Bo* 5. Alma, KS 
M401 or email to 
tttetit ijj ioiisflsjiaL 

FULL AND part-time help 
needed Please apply in 
person Feldkamps Form 
lure Man 7977 East High 
way 24. Manhattan 

GET PAID to drive a brand 
new cart Now paying dnv- 
ers Saoo- $3200 a month 
Pick up your free car key to 
day 
www.ffeecatkey.eom 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS is the nations leading 
pi jv.ii- oi utnnt deaf mad 

local government websites 
Microsoft ASP and SOL ex- 
perience required $14 SO 
mail resume In Mi- 
crosoft Word or ten formal 
lo |i,tir,'JI>c)viCpluscom 



3101 



Help Wanted 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAY- 

GROUND Supervisors 
Hall Monitors n?< 
Ihf .'no:, 20M nIuqI ,,-.v 
56 50 per hour, one and 
one- hall- two hours per day 
1 1 00 a m 1 00 p m Apply 
IS USD 383 2031 Poynl* 

Ave Manhattan ks 66502 

(7851587 2000 Equal Op 
portunity Employer 

OUTBOUND SAtES Civ- 

icPlus is the nation's leader 

in producing custom-do- 

(Ignad local gov 

website-, (.'iiiifiuiv we are 

hinng paniimt' and 

telemarketing slatf lo assist 

m our sates efforts Musi be 

Mod self- starter with 

strong communication skills 

Base wage plus bonuses 

equafc obOUl $19' hour or 

i:iii, m resume lo 

• in Mi 

Equal Opportunity Employ 



PftOMI I iied Ihis 

Saturday 46 hours tiefore 
toolbaii game Pay range 
St 5- $17* hour Contact 

ROYAL PURPLE YEAR 
BOOK staff is looking tot a 
marketing assistant to help 

-., ' ...■,'h ,, 

activities Work on salary lo 
ttHp promote K 
award-winning yearbook 

Ten houts/ week l 
mediately Call Undl 

ii (785)532-6557 V 
more inltirmation 

STUDENT NEI DtNQ nds 
home oocasionalily 
son. KS on weekfn I 
«penses n 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

inc ai Kanaaa Staif 

g applicalluns 
tor a part-time positiun In 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 18, 2005 




Christopher Hanewlntkel | COLLEGIAN 



In a study, the Big 1 2 Conference ranked third In basketball coliseum safety among the 32 Division I schools poled. 

SECURITY | Oklahoma bombing causes officials to take more precautions 



Continued from Page 1 

jrone in charge of facilities 
had tu lake notice of." he said. 

Ii will cause us to rethink 

inty measures for years to 
come." 

\ study by the United Stales 
Wademy looked into se- 



curity precautions that should be 
done during all phases of stadium 
operation, based on 21 concepts. 
This includes the presence of 
bomb-sniffing dogs and 24-hour 
security, a formal evacuation 
plan, as well as pre-event training, 
security patrols in the parking lot 
and coordination with local and 



state police. 

In basketball coliseums, the 
Big East Conference had the high- 
core. The Big 12 was third of 
32 poled Division 1 schools 

Students who have previously 
attended games at Bramlage. 
however, said they believe the se- 
curity is more than adequate. 



lonathan Stancek, sophomore 
in mathematics, said despite the 
Oklahoma incident, he isn't con- 
cerned about his safety. 

"With the amount of effort 
security does searching bags and 
whatnot, I'm comfortable noth- 
ing severe is going to happen at a 
ball game," he said 



SNYDER | National attention 
brings more students to Manhattan 



Continued from Page 1 

would tell you that home game 
weekends in Manhattan are 
like having six or seven extra 
holiday weekends, because the 
economic impact is that huge," 
Butler said 

One year after Snyder was 
hired, Manhattan's popula- 
tion was listed at 37,712. Since 
then, its population has soared 
to 47,842 - an increase of 
more than 10,000 residents 
In addition, K-State student 
enrollment has increased from 
18,120 to nearly 24,000 

Butler said he believes a 
large part of these increases di- 
rectly result from Snyder's abil- 
ity to win football games 

"The national media expo- 
sure that he has brought not 



only to K-State, but to Manhat- 
tan, has really helped put Man- 
hattan on the map" he said, "ft 
has brought a huge amount of 
attention to Manhattan, and 
that is something you cannot 
buy. 

"As a chamber and as a 
city, we could not afford to 
purchase that kind of positive 
media coverage in our wild- 
est dreams. That's worth hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars in 
the 17 years that he's been I he 
coach." 

Bob Krause, vice president 
for institutional advancement, 
said Snyder's contributions 
will never be replaced 

"Hundreds of thousands 
of lives, fans, players - that's 
his legacy," Krause said. "You 
don't replace that" 



WOMEN I Patterson looks 



for forwards to step up in post 



Continued from Page 6 

you can get the inside game go- 
ing, that will open up the out- 
side shooters," Lehning said. 

While pushing the ball to 
the posts does establish oppor 
(unities on the perimeter. Cog- 
ens said it will be crucial for 
the forwards to get the ball in 
tliu hoop once they gel it 

I think our posts are going 



to have to be huge for us (his 
year," Coggins said 

With more than a week in 
between games, the Wildcats 
feel more comfortable entering 
Sunday's opener at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 

1 We've had a whole week- 
and-a half of practice, and 
we're taking huge steps every 
time we step on the court," 
Coggins said 



MEN | Georgia Southern comes off loss to Texas Tech in 2K Sports Coaches vs. Cancer Classic in New York 



Continued from Page 6 

89-75 victory 1 over the University 
of Portland, and then followed 
that with a 74-61 loss against 
Texas Tech 

Georgia Southern proved 



to be a tough test for the Red 
Raiders, battling to a 33-33 tie 
at halftime However, Texas 
Tech shot 54.7 percent overall 
to pull away in the second half. 
K State recently completed a 
2-0 exhibition stint in which it 



defeated the EA Sports All-Stars 
and Emporia State. 

The Wildcats have won 10 
of their last 1 1 home openers 
and Wootdridge is 4- 1 in season 



openers. 
Without 



a doubt, Georgia 



Southern will provide the Wild- 
with their toughest test of 
the young season, Stewart said. 
Stewart added that starting 
the season off with a victory 
would help to boost the team s 
confidence level. 



"It's very big," Stewart salt] 
"You want to win every game 
Starting the season, 1-0 looks a 
lot better than 0-1" 

Wooldridge said he realized 
the importance of each game in 
the progression of the season 



"You build your season one 
game at a time," Wooldridge 
said This team we're play- 
ing is a good basketball team. 
We'll have to play well There's 
a lot at stake, but there's a lot at 
stake with every game" 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

GAMEDAY 



Friday. November 1 8, 2005 




Photos Page 3 1 Replacement Page 4 1 Snyder's last game Page 5 j Seniors Page 6 Baldwin and Smith Page 7 Fans Page 8 






Page 2 



GAM E DAY 



Friday, Nov, 18,2005 




/ 11 \ttbt ta bi$ $ ^ Stout os 

i,l,l till! iiHIIllilh- 

to hdf 'i"i' (upport f/ii) 

mivenit) inallltu ways that 

Iposttbl) can." 



Bill Snyder 
<t STATE COACH 



K-State (4-6, 1-6) vs. Missouri (6-4,4-3) 

1:10 p.m., Saturday 

History: Missouri leads 55-30-5 

Radio: K- Stall' Spnrts Network - 1350AM, 101.5FM 



Kill Snyder will GOtct) his 

final game at K -Stale after 17 

fan with i he progrun 

Snyder will retire tslfce 

sebooftwinninge*tco«di 

Wltil ■) rn.iiulnll.lS 68-1 

pnor toSatunkyigunc 

.mist Missouri. 




What they are saying about Snyder 




Sen. Pat Roberts, R Kan. - There are two kinds of coaches; those whose primary 
concern is their win-loss record and a select few who an teachers and by example, arc 
leaders of young men. Hill Snyder has been highly successful at both. He has led us out 
of the Death Valley days of defeat to great and lasting victories' 

llaydcn Fry, former head coach, Iowa - "He did a won- 
derful job for me for 17 years as an assistant coach. He is 
fundamentally the best coach 1 have ever seen." 

|oe Pulerno, head coach, Peon State - "He is one of 

tlmse people that other people don't quite appreciate be- 
cause of the (act that he is not an outgoing guy He is 
not a guy thai promotes himself, but he is a great football 
coach" 

Bob Stoops, head coach, Oklahoma - "I have tremen- 
dous respect for the work ethic, the determination and the 
thought that went into every practice and game plan by 
coach Snyder It has heen written about and talked about 
over a lot of years, but I don't know if anyone truly has a 
grasp on the turnaround that occurred at Kansas State and 
how far down the program was when he took over." 

Brent Ve nobles, associate head coach, Oklahoma - "Nobody is more respected 
in the coaching profession for the job he has done at Kansas State and the positive 
impact he has had on many young guys' lives It's a sad day that he's leaving the 

profession." 

Lloyd Carr, head coach, Michigan - At Kansas State he accomplished what 
many might have thought was Impossible, as he was able to build a program that 
consistently was of championship caliber He was good for the game." 

jim Leavilt, head coach, South Florida - "Nobody has impacted a program in col- 
lege football any more than coach Snyder has at Kansas State ' 



Senior linebacker Ted Sims - "He really taught life lessons, and I think that is the 
biggest thing I've learned. In a lot of programs, there is a lot of messing around and 
joking around, but here at K State under coach Snyder, it's like a career 

Red shirt fresh man quarterback Allan lv ridge - "I never saw it coming to be hon- 
est with you, just because of how meticulous he was and how hard he worked In (he 
recruiting process, other coaches used \a say he might be gone, but 1 never could have 
fathomed that would happen" 

Junior linebacker Maurice Mack - "(l (earned) determination la keep working hard 
and how to keep fighting and never quit You can determine how well you do in life 
and in football by how hard you work" 

Senior offensive lineman | cm nicy Clary I lie man is a legend He opened 
up doors for many young kids in this world and gave us a chance to con- 
tinue playing football and to continue making our dreams come true 
1 honor the guy and 1 cherish him, and I can't thank him enough fas 
everything he has done for me and other players alike ." 

Senior fullback Vtctof Mann - "It really hits you deep when you 

really think about everything he's done for this program and for 
I college football II there is one thing he's done, it's making sure he's 
/ kept everything in line the way thai he wanted He WH on lop of 
J his game at all time 

Senior defensive tackle Derek Marso - "I played for the toughest 
head coach ever I got to spend five years with him, and the nttfOfl 
I'm where I am today is because of him" 

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OFFENSE 



So K -State can rush. The 
Wildcats racked up 248 
rushing yard* against 
Nebraska, the second 
time in Big 12 Conference play 
they ti.ive gained more than 100 
yards on the ground. Red shirt- 
freshman quarterback Allan 
l\ ridge rushed for a career high 
I M v.mk and two touchdowns to 
lead K -State against the Huskers, 



ti 



Missouri's offense I 
begins and ends withJ 
senior quarterback Brad | 
Smith and rightfully so. 
Smith leads the Big 12 in rush- 
ing yards, averaging I OS yards 
on the season. However, in the 
Tigers' last two games on the road 

— losses at Kansas and Colorado 

— Smith has been held to an aver- 
age of 22 yards rushing. 



DEFENSE 



A This sea Miii, k Stale 
| *tVjT has lusi three games In 
I ▼ I three points or less, and 
it has been the play of 
the defense that has given the 
Wildcats a chance to he com- 
pel it ive in those games. K- State's 
strong suit has been against the 
run, where ihe Wildcats are sur 
rendering 124.0 yards per game 
and an allowing 3.4 yards per 
rush. K- State ranks No. 30 nation 
ally against the run 



Missouri's defense has 
given up an average of 
367,0 yards per game this 
year to rank No. 55 in 
the nation, compared to K-State's 
No. 42 ranking, lunior I hi eh acker 
David Overstreet is the leader 
ol the Tiger defense and one ot 
the better linebackers in the con 
lerence. Overstreel is averaging 
7,7 tackles a game this season 
Missouri gives up an average uf 
28J points per game. 



SPECIAL TEAMS 



One word can describe 
K- Stale's special teams 
play against Nebraska: 
horrid. 1 he Wildcats 
had an extra point and field goal 
blocked, fumbled the snap on 
another extra point attempt, and 
failed on a two- point conversion. 
Mik ean not happen Saturday for 
K State to win. The Wildcats are 
also Ihe second worst punting 
it -nil in Ihe Big 12, averaging a 
paltry 12 . 1 >arels per punt 







The Tigers are the 
league's third best punt 
return team, averaging 
13.5 yards per return, 
i unsidering the weakness of the 
Wildcats' punt unit, this could 
pnse mayor problems for K- Stale. 
However, Missouri's kickoff cov 
erage unit ranks last in the Big 
12, giving up 38.6 yards per kkt 
return. This is a potential weak 
ness for the Tigers and an area 
k State must try to exploit 



PREDICTION 



This game is quite possibly the 
biggest must wm game in school 
hctuiy, even though it has no 
bearing on k State's postseason 
future. Sending coach [till Snyder 
out with a win is a must, and the 



team knows this. However, the 
players must remember they -.till 
have to play, and Ihe Tigers have 
no plans to roll over. Rut K State 
wins this game for Snyder 
— K State 30, Missouri 14 




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Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



GAME DAY 



Page 3 



Images of the year 





Christopher Hanewlnckcl | (01 1 tOIAN 

K State coach Bill Snyder talks into his headset during 
K-State's home loss to Colorado, 



Christopher Hartewinckel [COliiWAN 
Bill Snyder shakes hands with Texas A&M's Dennis Fraruhione after K State's game against the Aggies at the newly named 
Snyder Family Stadium, formerly KSU Stadium, 




CatnnaRavvson | I 
K State coach Bill Snyder points to a fan before the Wildcats played 
Iowa State In Ames, Iowa, on Nov. 5. The Cats lost to the Cyclones 45-1 7, 



'The deal is, 

K-State is far 

bigger than Bill 

Snyder. This is 

about a 
university that is 
very, very unique 

and very, very 

special, and I was 

just blessed with 

the opportunity 

to be a small part 

of it." 

BILL SNYDER — COACH 




Catrina Rawsort | 



On the sidelines at the Nebraska game, coach Bill Snyder talks with quarter 
back Allan EvrMg*. Nov. \ 2 in Lincoln, Neb. The Wildcats lost the game 2 7 2V 



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Page 4 



GAMEDAY 



Friday, Nov. 18, 2005 



Weiser's big decision 




Catrini Rawson | fOllE&IAN 
K- State Athletic Director Tim Weiser talks during a press conference after coach Bill Snyder announced his retirement Nov. 1 S, while Snyder looks on. 

AD charged with task of finding replacement 



By Anthony Mendoza 
KANSAS SWTUOUKWI 

When coach Bill Snyder an- 
nounced Ins retirement from 
coaching ruesday, one reason 
ivi' for leaving w;is that the 
i in straggles have 
'taken gome of the glow off the 
program." 

nyder has been 
miii for K Stale foot 

mncnl announce- 

'■ loud of doubt over 

trn one thai Athletics 

Directoi rim Weiser said would 

be addressed until alter Sal 
Missouri 
a won't be 
.tbout 
■ ■•.' Weiser 
nrale 
and what he's ac- 
ml he having 
my comments until after the 
I wh ( re we go or 
tb it." 
irement in mid 
ber does not leave 
K Stai< In a recruiting bind, 
ins back Thomas 
vton said, because national 
trig day is nol until Febru- 



ary, giving Weiser and his staff 
time to pick a successor 

"The fact that 
he announced 
his retirement 
right now, in 
early November, 
it gives whoever 
comes in plenty 
of time to get re- 
cruits in," Clay- 
ton said. "So 
often you hear 
a coach just 
getting in there 
in January and 
signing day is 
in February - 
you're not able 
to get recruits. 
Right now we 
still have am- 
ple to bring in 
whomever it is 
that we need to 
bring in We'll 
be line." 

At his regular 
news confer- 
ence last Sun- 
day, Snyder said 
he is "not un- 
happy with where the recruiting 
stands right now, but for us it is 



"We know it's 
something that's 
not going to hap- 
pen overnight. 
It's going to be 
a process. If it 
doesn't happen 
before the end of 
the school year, 
then we're going 
to go home for 
Christmas break 
and just have to 
sit and wait. " 



Marcus Watts 
SQPHOMOftE SMf TV 



still reasonably early" 

He added that recruiting 
is often easier 
when teams have 
struggled because 
it gives potential 
recruits the oppor- 
tunity to have an 
effect right away 

"1 go back 
to the early '90s 
and we had a lot 
of young | 
because all OJ I 
sudden they saw, 
Wow, if your pro- 
gram hasn't done 
well of recent then 
you probably stand 
a better chfl 
to gel on the field 
much quicker,"' 
Snyder said A 
lot i if young guys 
make decisions for 
different reasons 
One of the reasons 
a lot of youngsters 
make their deci- 
sion on Ins how 
quickly can they 
get on the field 
"For every downside, there is 

an upside somewhere, but sure 



it has an impact on young guys 
who say, is this a gond place to 

K State will return IK start- 
ers next yeur 

I he majority of the offense 
will he back anil the defense los- 
es only defensive ends learn us 
George and Scnlt Kdmonds 

Edmonds played in only one 
game this season, a 43 17 loss to 
Iowa Slate in Ames, low 1 

Edmonds missed last w< 
game against Nebraska because 
of a virus. 

Leading tackier Marcus 
Watts, who Snyder moved in the 
off-season from wide receiver to 

free safety, said he Wintl I new 

con possible, but 

he is also willing to wait for a 
ion.a 
"We know it's something 
that's not going to happen over 
night," Watts said "It's going to 
be a process II it doesn't hap- 
pen before the end of the school 
year, then We're going 10 gfl 
home for Christmas break and 
just have to sit and wail 

It's going (0 be a long next 
two months though, but it's nol 
something we can think aboul 
right now though" 




We've got the stories you've got to read. 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzle 103. Stop by or call 532-6SS5. 



Potential candidates 

"For this week, we won't be having any comments on 

candidates or pn I'm not going to have any 

comment until alter the season about where we go and how 

we proceed with it." 

Tim Weiser 
ATHLCTICS OMCCTOR 





Phil Bennett 
Head Coach, SMU 
Bennett worked 
under Snydet from 
1 999-2001 as de- 
fensive coordinator 
before taking over 
an embattled SMU 
program. 



Jim Leavitt 

Head Coach, 

South Florida 
Leavitt toadied at 
K State from 1990 
9S. The Bulls are 
three victories away 
from earning a 60S 
bowl berth 






Darrell Dickey 




Head Coach, 




North Texas 




Okkey, a formet K 




State quarterback, 




led the Wildcats to 


J 


the 1982 Indepen- 




dence Howl It was 




K State 






Chuck Long 
Off. Coordinator, 
Oklahoma 

long played 
quartet'' 

Iowa from 19W fti, 
when Snyder served 

as the Hawk' , 
tensive coordinator 




Dana Dlmel 

Grad. Assistant, 
K Stare 

Dime) coached 
at KSlate from 

1987%, and 
served as head 
coach at Wyoming 
and Houston. 



Gary 
Patterson 

Head Coach, TCU 

Patterson was 
born in Lamed, 
Kan., and ptayed 
at K- Slate horn 
1981 -82. He has 
ledTOJtoalO I 
record. 



Bob Elliott 

Def. Coordinator, 
K State 

Filial! served as an 
assistant at Iowa 
before joining 
Snyder at K-Slate 
in 2002 as defen- 
sive coordinator. 



Brent 

Venables 
Assoc. Hd. Coach, 

Oklahoma 
Venables played 
at K- State from 
1991 92 and 
coached at K State 
from 199J-98 




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Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



GAMEDAY 



Page 5 



Memorable moments 




Snyder sendoff 

Wildcats want to honor coach 
by defeating Missouri Tigers 





By Michael Ashford 
KANMSSUKCQllfGIAN 

Before Tticsdaty. K-State'i 

game Saturday against Missouri 
set mod like a mere formality. 

No matter the outcome againsl 

the Tigers, ihe Wildcats (4 $, I 6) 
will not go to a bowl game, will 
finish the season with a losing re 
cord and will be left with manv 
questions as to what went wTORg 
for a second straight season. 
But after Tuesday's announce 

mail that coach hill Snyder will 

retire following Saturday's game 
alter 17 years as head coach, the 

matChUp With Missouri cniikl 

rank as one of the biggest and 
most memorable games in school 
history. 

Coupled with the fact thai 17 
seniors will be playing their final 
game, and it makes lor one giant 
concoction of memories 

But will it be so much that it 
becomes a distraction' 1 

"If I don't take my phone off 
the hook, it'll be tremendously 
distracting," Snyder joked during 
his retirement press conference 
"I Ihink we can gel through il 
I bave great confidence in our 
coaches and great confidence 
in our players, and I have confi 
dence that I can put some things 
on l tic hack burner and stay to 

cased on what's out there for this 

preparation " 

With w much emotion sur 
rounding Saturday, the fact that 
the Wildcats still have a game i" 

play is seemingly lost m 

And it s not as it the Wildcats 
will be lacmg a gimme opponenl 

Missouri (6 l i J) will have 
plenty of motivation of its own. 
Should Missouri bead is Si 
Iowa State beat Kansas next week 
and Colorado lose to Nebr 
next week tin It-crs will capture 

their first-flyer Big 12 Conference 

North title 

The Tigers have already 
wrapped up a bowl bid and h 
the lli^; 1 2 s leading rusher in 

seiuoi quarterback Brad Smith 

Smith is averaging 108 rushing 
cards pet game and is third in 
the league in total offense at 28 i 

yards a contest 

However, the Wildcats Ihink 

they have what it takes to slow 
Smith, who is in danger of leaving 
Missouri having never beaten the 
Wildcats in three previous in. 

Smith's style is something the 

Wildcats are very familiar with, 
free safety Marcus Wait* said, and 
that could help K-Stale's chances 
on Saturday to get a win fur Sny- 
der 



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■ Viu worry about Brad Smith, 
il you look .ii ini.il yards and 

touchdowns and everything on 
theti offense," Witts said. "As 
m ut 1 1 u we see guys lik*.' that in 
i on system with mLunerbaeki Al- 
len Webb and then playing (Texas 
A&M's) Reggie McNeal, it's good 
because \ i n it and you 

know whal to be prepared for." 

More iii. hi stopping Smith Iha 
K Stat* players' goal ior Saturday 
ia simple nei Snyder his 136th 
win and provide ■> foundation toe 
thcfunin 

Ui re going towin this game," 
Hi mur running hack MiomasClay- 
ton said empnalii ally. "We have 

hoict weVe got to send him 

ofl the righi waj send the seniors 

nil (he righi waj and also set the 

tone fortl i assmen com- 

k nexl season.'' 

Despite the emotional circum- 
staju undins Saturday's 

game ii is not yet s sellout 

\ call to the KSU Ticki 
Wednesdaj afternoon n> 

led 6,000 tickets remained 
foi Saturday s game down from 
7,000 at noon luesd 

Sennit linebacker ltd Suns 
Slid he i U'lhieal t.ms 

Witn i disappoint, and Sims said 
he is excited to see what the at- 
mosphere is like .it i lie newly -re* 
named Snyder r-amily stadium 
tut Snyder's last garni as k state's 

'You know ii s going to he a 
packed, loud house" Sum said 
"I tan i imagine what it's going 
tn be like lot the Cans on the very 
last game <>i his career It's ^oing 
to he something else; something 
III always cherish •nut never for 

gel ii a something youll be able 
to tell your grandkids Id, 1*>, 20 

Should the game become a 

sellout M would be K State's first 

when k State 

defeated Nebraska 15 21 In trout 

lans 
thing is ii ■ Mack 

said and that is mat then 

UtUI to plaj tor this S.itin 

day 

[i had 

St, peat career, and there's 

prababt) no other coach thai 
hetter coach I' 

Mack said No other team, even 
the ■ pionship i 

can da what wc can do this year, 
and dial s give coach his last win. 
Everybody's got lhat extra moti- 
vation to go uui and iry to win 
tins one for coach.'' 




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Page 6 



GAMEDAY 



Friday, Nov. 18,2005 



Seniors' goal: 
win 1 more game 

Final game an opportunity 
for 17 seniors to leave winners 



By Mark Potter 
KAWA LEGtAH 

Fatitoi de 
fensivt lineman Derek 
poured hb life 
Jute football 
Saturday •>' Hill Snyder Pain 
I ill Stadium, Wildcat 
■ I to show 
ition for Maria and 
ol K- Slatt's senior class, 
I ( oach Bill Snyder. 

mis to defea! 

i but not for himsell or 

he wants to 

n I Ji 

\ n tn would be huge." Marso 

lo be a ii'i 

notions "Lit there, and hope- 

i get ii 



i 

i d rstartds 
■ i pour 
I 

Snyder, 
i the 

Mfl.IV 

n made 

as put 
named 

i foot- 

3 pri- 
mi 
■ . 

■nil coach 
re- 

l K-StaU 
enter 

.. ■ i ■ itayed to dis- 
iion 
■ . send bin 
uid 
s been hen 

.uid we need to get him 

... way out" 
With 27-23 loss 

i 1'" oln Net 

(bopped five 
ongest 

. isun 
■6 II 

iouri's last 
Jjin al then KSU Stadium 
* Despite tl 

t|on mild be sal- 

I with a win against Mis- 

nior lincbat kei fied Sims 



"We have all 
these young 
people who 
are going to 
be here for 
the last time, 
I just happen 
to be fortu- 
nate enough 
to go out with 
them." 



BillSnyrter 
COACH 



"We want tu win for coach 
Snyder, this being his last game," 
Sims said. "It's going to mean w 
erything." 

Senior fullbaek VtCtOl Mann 
added that Saturday'l game has a 
chance to mean something great 
in the history ol the K State root 
ball program 

■knowing that we can put 
ountthrei in history with one of 
Ihe greatest coaches, and jusi to 
have the opportunity to be the 
class and Ihe team to have his 
last win here at K-State 
i ne, ins i hit in everybody," Mann 
i ran though we are not 
going to a bowl game, for us to 
get a will (his weekend, tli.it will 
put us at the top" 

Fans will bid 
farewell to 17 seniors 
who possess a com- 
hined reeord of 40- 19 
over the last 
In it seasons, includ- 
ing K-Stete's only Big 

12 Conference CI 

pionship in 2003 
with K-State 35 -7 vic- 
tory over then-No. 1 
Oklahoma in h 
City. Mo. 

Sims, an inte- 
gral part ol the cham- 
pionship Si. 
he hopes the- 
niors will be n i 
hered as vvinii 

"We've been 
through tli 
ups and downs, S 
said "Ue ate going 
remembered as winners I 

think, especially if we go oat this 
last game and plaj n ith the effort 
and enthusiasm we should." 

While Mann admitted ti i losing 
sleep over Snyder's announce- 
ment, he said the Wildcats will 
be focused on game day 

"This will give us a little more 
focus, knowing what we are go- 
ing into and what we have at 
stuke Mann said 

Tuesday. Snyder expressed 

confidence in his players' ahiim 

to lay distractions aside in pre- 
paring for Saturday's game 

In addition, he noted how 
special il will I 
game on Senior Day 

"We have all these young pen 
pie who are going to be hen 
the last time. 1 just happen to be 
fortunate enough to go out with 
them," Snyder said. 




Victor Mann stiff- 
arms a Nebraska 
defender while 
running into the 
endzone for a 
touchdown Nov. 
1 2 at Lincoln, Neb. 

Catrlna Raw son 

SUN 



Right: Derek Marso celebrates to 

Marcus Watts during the Colorado 

game Oct. 29, 

Calrina Rawion 

Below: Senior off et i i'VH lineman 
Jeromey Claty fights off a defender 
during K-State s game against Mar 
shall on Sept. to. Clary will play his 

last game Saturday at the newly - 
named Snyder Family Stadium. 

Chriitophet KanewmtM I 





Seniors 



Name Position 


Martinez, Jesse 


P/WR 


Griffith, Tony DB 


Saba, Ayo 


FB 


Davis, Suited DB 


Clary, Jeromey 


01 


Sims, Ted LB 


Mann, victor 


FB 


Edmonds, Scott DE 


George, Tearnus 


DE 


Evans, Justin QB 


Dennis, Davin 


WR 


Alsup, Carlos RB 


Portei, Maurice 


DB 


Butler, Matt LB 


Tetuan, Jesse 


DB 


Simmons, Marvin LB 


Marso, Derek 


DT 



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GAMEDAY 



Page 7 



Cornerback Baldwin 
K-State's silent leader 



5 Games to watch 




Christopher Hanewmtkel | • Oil Kl'-N 
Bryan Baldwin attempts to t,irk(<? Oklahoma's Travis Wilson during their game against Oklahoma on O 

Sophomore producing in 1st year as starter 



By Cedrique Flemmtng 

WNSAiilAllI'lllltUHN 

If you talk to the dm 
»if k orbaH team, some 

players on tin 

when it comes t<> leadership, 

Btii yjcx sophomore 

oomerbai i Baldwin 

nd who Irad by example 

Baldwin I worl ■ fhi 
him the reaped ol hh teammates 
junior linebackei Maurice Mack 
said, and Ma. I 

win has impressed him with how 
determined h< 

mine and ho* dedicated he is la 
the tram 

■Ml i% one of thou 
are pretty determined to come in 
and won 
is going to gh 
dm matter i 

Baldwin, 185 

pound native ot SI nade 

Ins first 
lin-,1 

Florida i 

nl just i i a' started 



Ik has S7 tackles i 
26 solo and 1 1 assisted which 
on the team to 
an inter- 

■ I HIS. 

Baldwin said he understands 
his rote mi the alent 

tcadei and said I* 

I,: he has day in and day out 
lo hel 

"I definitely think thai I have a 
lot ol hai ion," 

Bakh> ■ not too much 

but 1 try to 

Iwinsaid heisconfid 
his position and holding his - 
on his aastgnmen he 

j Ins team I 

ol ili lities, and he 

knows Hi' 

mistake 
' issignments 
I 
laid i havi Eaith In 

■ .. 



to if 

Bald ..ii was 

for 15 yards on t < 
Texas Tech, a game when- in had 
a cam' i high three pass breakups 
and Tn i 

1 1, has rei orded six tackles in 
reer, 
both comi ■ ison 

His lirst six iai kle game came 

Od 1 ugainst (he Oklahoma 

where he aiao had a 

pass breakup, with the other 

the Iowa 

Nc 
rded 

i and 
i he 
returned foi Hi | 

. 
Marsu said B i quiet 

demeanor, hi/ 
world of ulent 

"He's l si lei i id not 

EMarso said. "I 
itie of the b 



Collegian football 


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KState 


KSUte 


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J014 




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Michigan 


No. 17 Michigan 




18-24 




21-17 


No 8 Alabama at 


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Auburn 


Auburn 


Auburn 


No 1 1 Auburn 






2117 


30-13 






APTop20 






l Southern Cat 


4otre Dame l ! Auhttni 




hi t rcsno State 


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Virginia! 


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i Michigan 


J Miami (PI 


8 Alabama 


l } West Virginia 


is Louisville 


II sv 


9 i >hiu State M.( icorgi; 




i'» Sunlit ( arotina 


5 IVnn Stale 


10. Oregon 


15. i 




2G. Florida 



Cat defense focused on Smith 



By Cedrique F lemming 

kan, man 

While K Stat 
the retirement ol coach Bill 
Snyder, the Missouri 

si ill COI 



jf^^^^^^fc urday the 

final Cine' DJ 
• J "1 the ri 

"I still cannot 
believe h 

*- a¥U he 

Smith us next i 

hi, 

i iet M;n. k 

still have .i same to play this 
ive to pre 

... ;-i'.. last W 

Mil using off all 

■ : last Saturday against 



Baylor, which , 
then lixth win ol Ihi year and 
them bowl cligibli 
Mul whili ri running 

I It had a . 
high Hid yards rushing s 
Baylor, he is not t! 

That distinction go< 
ieih.uk Brad Smith 

Smith i ■ Big 12 

leading 108 
rushine. per game and has 13 
rushing touchdowns tins i 

mhi (o m 

mm 

tt ildi.it defense has I 
for everything SmitJ 

"He i their 

offensi worry 

everything," H 
"You h i Brad 

Sii>i(li ts at all til 

Missouri Smith lin 



ished the ga i 1 1 bi 205 

passing yards with two TDa He 
sJso had S8 rushing yards 
But the stoiA for Smith has 
.i hJJ about tins season 

1 1 bet line the hrst quar- 
tcrback in Division I hislury lo 
S 000 yards passing and 
4, ItOO yards rushing in a career, 
and his 1,068 rushing yards are 
a Division I quarterback re 

, li also owns the Big 12 
toial offense record with 12,117 

Hi' ioi threw 

lor 234 vards and rushed lor 
24ti ;u ka on Od 

id Ins ISO yards ol total 

offense sel the school record 

The key i" shutting down 
Stniili litis weekend will be min- 
imizing big plays, senioi 
ickle Derek Marso said 
Wt . i that 

human and he can be 
slopped," Marso said. 



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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 21, 2005 




1122 Laramie 



Bring this ad in for a 

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Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Smooth- 
talking 
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hand 

person 

t) Bobby of 

hockey 
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23 -csr 

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28 Donate 

31 Keatsian 
verse 

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neyed 

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emeritus 
Rather 

35 Ptglets 
papa 



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Ihe ntghl 
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way ot 

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deers 
49 Eternal 

51 MUWH 
ot walking 

52 Seed 
cover 

53 Shelter 

54 Wilder- 
KM 
trek 

55 Libretto 

56 IfKleed 

57 Dis- 
patched 



DOWN 

1 Bunch ol 
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SBCtinty 

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lating, 
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19 Sedimen- 
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22 ■ Virtue - 
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24 Com 
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25 Fuss 

26 Kitchen 
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27 Rankings 

29 Anatom- 
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33 Love 

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Inii.n, '-■. ( rypmquip Due: J cquuK l ; 



WEEK IN REVIEW 

7 things you didn't know 7 days ago 

West Virginia bans grain alcohol 




Jeff Centner | till. AHOtlHIO PKEVS 
A customer shops near the remaining bottles ot grain alcohol, Wednesday at Liquor 
Mart in Charleston, W.Va, The West Virginia Alcohol Beverage Control Administration has 
banned the sate of grain alcohol in the state, calling it a public health and safety hazard. 



WmI Virginia banned grain alcohol on Wednes- 
day because of concerns from college officials 
and others The stale's Alcohol Beverage Con 
trol Administration stopped stocking the 190- 
pronl grain alcohol ,u it's warehouse, which 
provides the st:ttc with all liqunr The ban was 
announced Wednesday, however, the stale 
asked retailers U> pull the product from tin.- 
shelves. West Virginia University spokeswom- 
an Reeky Lofstead said she couldn't recall any 
specific incidents with students involving the 
product, but applauded the agency's efforts 

SENIOR ISLAMIC MILITANT KILLED 

Israeli troops killed Amjad Hanawi, i senmr 
Hamas Islamic group militant, on Monday 
Troops arrived at Hanawi s home and ordered 
everyone out. according to Palestinian witness- 
es and the Israeli military Several of Hanawi's 
assistants surrendered, but he came out shoot 
ing and troops returned fire. Palestinian wit 
nesses said he was shot as he tried to climb a 

NEGOTIATIONS OPEN UP BORDER 

Sec rctary of S( ate C on dol ce ?za Kice a nn< ni n c ecl 
Tuesday that a deal was reached mi the bolder 
crossings in Gaza Kice said the deal was a "big 
step forward" in Israeli Palestinian relations. 
She presided over the final round on talks 
Under the deal, the Gaza- Egypt border will be 
opened tentatively Nov. 25 and construction 
of a Gaza seaport would begin The deal will 
allow Palestinians to travel between the West 
Bank and Gaza in bus COflVi rjs through Israel 

TIPS TO AVOID FOOD POISONING 

The government offered tips on Thursday on 
how to avoid food poisoning this Thanksgiving 

At the lop of the list was washing hands, keep 
ing raw food separate from cooked food, using 
a thermumelei and storing leftovers in small 



Dr. Ryan J. Kueker 



Optometrist 




bkiute EytHaUi 
Enc C«**1 In* Ejoi. 
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Travel Safely 
During 

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Break, 

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portion! loud poisoning makes 7ri million 
people >u'k each year, according to the Centers 

lor DISCS 'I and Prcvcnii' 

ASTHMA MEDICATIONS UNSAFE 

The Food and Drug Administration warned 
Friday that three asthma drugs. Advair, Scr- 
evenl and Foradil, could increase the risk of 
re asthma attacks and even death The 
FDA said the drugs should be prescribed only 
it other medical ion> rJo uaA control the asthma. 
GlaxoSmilh Kline PLC, which makes both Ad 
vair and Serevent, isscn ncnt disagree- 

ing with the PDAs sdvisof) Lin company said 
it would "address the differences ol opini 
Schenng- Plough Corp , v^hich markets Foradil 
in the United States, said i! t] working with tile 
II i A to update the wanunc label 

TROOPS TO STAY UNTIL NECESSARY 

President Bush said Saturday there would be 

no caik- withdrawal of troops from irr.icj i»- 

cause "sober pidgment" must prevail over cmo 
lional calh Hits added to mt debate in ( 
grcss over hj| Im policies and the timing ol 
any US withdrawal Bush spoke at the end of 
a three -day slay in South Kop 

CAMPAIGN WORKER SHOT 

Egypt's second round ol verting was weakened 
by widespread violence on Sunday Police said 
a campaign worker, Mnhamnied Khalil Ebr.i 
him, was shot and killed in Alexandria and wit 
nesses reported many injuries Hie dashes were 
between supporters ol the Muslim Brother- 
hood and the ruling party Than "fc ),70ti can- 
didates corii|» 2 constituencies in this 
round of elections and results lit not GXpt 
until Monday Khalil lbrahin ■nrtcdlya 
driver for an indej'. 

Source; TrW Ajsoodt *d Pr«S 



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ft M<in. Fri. '> a in. -5 p.m. ] 






The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Potke Department's 
daily logs. The Collegian does not (1st wheel locks or minot traffic 
violations because of space constraints. 

Thursday, Nov. 17 

■ Crystal Haven, 250O Farm Bureau Road, Lot 165, was arrested at 
9:5? a.m. for battery. Bond was set at $500. 

■ Derek Braddotk, 2500 farm Bureau Road, Lot 374, was arrested 
at 10:20 a.m. for battery. Bond was set at $500, 

■ font Rets, 2140 5loan St., was arrested at 2:40 p.m. for failure to 
appear Bond was set at $20,000. 

■ Brent Garrison, 716 Humboldt St., was arrested at 4:45 p.m. for 
two counts of failure to appear. Bond was set at $309. 

■ Gregory Fostet II, Kansas City, Mo., was arrested at 9 p m. fot 
driving with a suspended license. Bond was set at $750. 

■ LaJuan Pitt, 714 N. 8th St.. was arrested at 1 1 p.m for failure to 
appear. Bond was set at $139. 

Friday, Nov. 18 

■ Melissa Drouhard, 1424 Beechwood terrace, Apt. 3, was arrested 
at 2:05 a.m. for disorderly conduct. Bond was set at $500. 

■ Lee Pace, Ogden, Kan., was anesled at 4:05 a.m. foi battery, 
criminal damage to property and witness Intimidation. Bond was 
set at $1,500 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar it the Collegian's campus bulletin board service 
Items in the calendat can be published up to three times. Items 
might not appear because of space constraints but are guaranteed 
to appear on the day of the activity To place an item in the Campus 
Calendar, stop by Kedzie 116 and fill out a lorm or e-mail the news 
editor at collegionmpub.kiu.edu by 1 1 am two days before it is 
to run 

■ An effective web searching class will be from 2:30 to 3:15 
p.m. today in Hale 408. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of the 
dm tin j| dissertation of Ryan Rehmeier at I p.m today in Adtert 
324A. 

■ The Collegium Mustcum will be performing selections from 
the Renaissance era at 7:30 tonight in All Faiths Chapel. 

■The HSU Jazz Bands will perform a tree concert at 7 30 tonight 
in McCain Auditorium 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space (f you see some 
thing that should be corrected, call news editor Ktisten Rodenck at 
532-6556 or e mail (oltegiomatipuhkiu.edu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas Stale Collegian, a student newspaper 
at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedile 103, Manhattan, KS 66506. The Collegian ts published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during 
the summer Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 
POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas Stale Collegian, 
circulation desUedfie 103.Mar.hatU 1566506-7167 
O Kansas State Collegian, 7005 



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Friday, Nov. 21,2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Ways to avoid holiday weight gain 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS S1ATE COUI GIAN 

For some, eating healthy dur- 
ing the holidays is a difficult task 
But by taking a few simple steps, 
party-goers tan avoid gaining 
holiday pounds and enjoy the 
taste of the Mtttll 

1. PRACTICE HEALTHY 
COOKING, OFFER 
TO BRING A DISH 

While some per) pie may de- 
vote (heir holiday eating to their 
Aunt Marsha's to-die-fnt Fudge 
or pet mii pit' I he American Dia- 
betes Association encourages 
party attendee* to olfer bringing 
a healthy dish to a parly This is 
I Minple way to guarantee tlut 
non-gluitonuus foods will also 
In available for those watching 
their food Intel 

Home & Garden Television 
food experts suggest these fat 
fighting baking substitutions 
Use three tabwspooni of un- 
sweetened cocoa powdei 1 ■. > re 
plate one ounce of unsweetened 
hocolate in desserts, crushed 
graham crackers are a healthier 
alternative to pig crusts, replace 

one eg with two egg whites di 
nnc fourth cup of egg substitute; 
replace half ol the oil in deaaerl 

recipes with an equal amount ul 
ned applesauce, and 
use reduced- ur linn -fal In 
yogurt instead ol ice < ream on 

pich 

2. NEVER ARRIVE TO 
HOLIDAY PARTIES 
HUNGRY 

Win n attending 
v. don't (a maclt be 

lurch id NtSM Siinrin. 

health expert at Woman D 
magazine \ little pre-party 
snack will help prevent party- 



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goon from overeating, a com- 
mon cause ol weight gain during 
the holidV 

ling about too to 200 
calories an Imur or so before 
.i party will prevenl you from 
showing up hungry and eating 
rverylhing m sight," she sadd 
I itirtg regularly keeps your 

blood sugai levels front spiking 
and fallin can make you 

leel tired and hungry - and vul 
rrindulging lai< 

3. USE A SMALLER PLATE 

Don't treat holiday meals like 
an all-you-ean-eal buffet Ulc "I 
nwer plate can help people 
conserve on their plate packing. 
and in turn, their stoma 
ing, said Hilary K lover, junior in 
diete! 



"Sometimes it helps with t.ik 
ing smaller portions," Klover 
Sfid Most foods are often load- 
■d with extra fats for flavor, so 
make sure In have Vegetables 

4. SIT DOWN AND EAT 

While it may I ing to 

stand, nibble and socialize, sit 
ting down forces caters In pay 
attention to «Imi and how much 
(hey eat, Simon said Ignoring 
food intake leads to di 
Milts The American Die; 
Vasociation states in a typical 
holiday meal setting, people can 
eat more than 2,000 calories, the 
average person's daily calorie in- 
take 

"If you overeat at one meal 

go light ifi tin lid Greta 

aire, registered dietician at 



Courtesy art 



the California Pacific Medical 
Center ' ll takes ')00 calories per 
day (or 3,500 calories per week) 
above your normal eons Jrnpt ion 
to gain one pound" 

5. LIMIT ALCOHOL INTAKE 

lake it easy on the aduli bev 
erages. While people dtm'l have 
in swear off alcohol entirely 
moderation is definitely imp i 
Lint, Simon said 

"Not only are alcoholic 
drinks calorie- heavy, they also 
increase your appetite* 1 she said, 
Plus, as anyone whose had a 
fas. too many can attest 
tower your self-control" 
i void a huge calorj 

Simon said In I hoc 
wine spritzer or light beer as op 
l >• >sed to bard liquor. 



Breadbasket offers 
Thanksgiving meal 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSAS 5MT[ (OILMAN 

Nataschii Phillip is prepar 
log fl meal for more than 1 ,000 
this Thursday 

she, along with other mem 

hers of the Flint Hills Bread- 
basket, will facilitate the an- 
nual community Thanksgiving 
Dinner from noon lo 2 p in 
on Thanksgiving Day. 

As executive director for 
I lie Flint Hills Breadbasket. 
Phillip said she has encour 
aged students who are unahle 
to go home for Thanksgiving 
irtieipate in the event 
The traditional meal is oil. i« d 
free ol charge lo anyone who 
wants to attend 

Through events like this, 
"Manhattan has tradition- 
ally opened up its amis and 
ils pocke [books to help those 
people wttO may be down 
on their luck," said Lyle But 
let, president of Manhattan 

Chamber of Commerce and 

Mini Mills Breadbasket board 
member "The Thanksgiving 
dinner has been very sue 
ceasful It's very meaningful 
Tor people in the community 
lo have something to do for 

folks" 

lii the past few years, the 
community thanksgiving 

Day dinner has fed more than 
1.200 people in the commu- 
nity The group also delivers 
meals lo local groups, includ 
ing the Riley County Police 
Department and Man h.it!. in 
fire Department 

so fabulous to sec 
(Ik cfty unite together at this 



Community 
Thanksgiving Day dinner 

When: Noon to 2 p.m., Nov. 24 
Where: M-tntwtUn Hnjh School Cast 
tampuv'Wl PoytitiAve. 
Ceitt Free 

time of year, especially when 
we might nol snare religious 
belief! and things like that," 
Manhattan resident Brandon 
Baker said I think it'll finally 
give me a shot to meet people 
from a variety of backgrounds 
in I Ins community college 
students, the rich and poor 
and others" 

ThrOUghoul the year, the 

Flint Hills Breadbasket aims 
"to minimise hunger and pov 

ri tv through the distribution 
ol available food and to nur- 
ture protects that help all 
ate hunger and poverty," their 
mission statements states 

In 2004, the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket distributed 1 B 
million pounds of food th.il 
served more than 51,000 fam 
[ties 

While the group aims to 
reach out to the 20.6 percent 
of Riley County residents [hat 
live at or below (In- poverty 
level. Butler said one of its 
largest goals is lu serve all 

parts ni the community 

"It's incredible lor the ie 
spouse we get year in and 
year out." Buller said there 
arc a lot ol people, lor une 
reason or another who Can 
not be with family It sin 
as a community, thai we are 
a family and are concerned 
aboul each Oth 




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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 21, 2005 



TO THE POINT 

Teachers should 
turn in lists 
by deadline 

Textbooks are college students' achilles 
heels. 

It is often a hassle to crowd into a 
bookstore at the end and beginning of 
each semester and attempt to purchase 
textbooks for class. 

Adding to the diffi- 
culty of getting through 
bookstores during peak 
times is the ability to 
find the correct books 
because instructors 
have not submitted lists 
to the stores. 

It is irresponsible for 
instructors to not make 
the deadline for submit- 
ting required textbook 
lists. There is as much 
reason to miss that 
deadline as there is for 
students to not turn in 
term papers. 

Not having lists in on time hurts stu- 
dents who want to sell textbooks. If the 
stores do not know which books are be- 
ing reused, they are at a loss in knowing 
what to buy back. 

The problem is compounded when 
other students want to purchase books. 
They are unable to find the required texts 
on the seemingly-endless shelves of learn- 
ing material. 

In the future, it is the responsibility of 
all instructors to meet their deadlines for 
submitting books. 

There is no reason for the expectations 
of students and instructors to be different. 

Having instructors make one dead- 
line each semester is easy compared 
with the many students are expected 
to meet. 



To the point ts an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Michael Ashford 

Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Gfrard 
Matt Gorn ey 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annette Lawless 
Anthony Men do z a 
Alex Peak 
Catrina Rawson 
Kristen Roderick 
Dave Skretta 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e-mail \o lemn@ipnbJau.edu, or In person to 
Kedne 116 Please include your hill name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words Ail submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



: 



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Giving thanks 

Production, consumption make holiday possible 



One of the great thinkers of the 20tli 
century once espoused, "Thanksgiving is 
a typically American holiday... The lavish 
meal is a symbol of the fact that 
abundant consumption is the 
result and reward of production." 

Ayn Rand, the Russian-born 
American writer and philosopher 
understood with her foreign 
perspective what many American 
natives fail to grasp. 

Obnoxious anecdotes about 
Native Americans, pilgrims and 
turkeys aside, few grasp the 
importance of this American 
tradition, 

"Americans consume more than 
anyone else" is what the apologist wail. 
But consumable goods do nol materialize 

The turkey, the wine, cranberry-sauce, 
stu fling, pumpkin pie. the jets that bring 
loved ones from around the country to 
our doorstep - all have been produced fi >r 
the consumer 

We enrich ourselves with good food, 
and good company, while we enrich the 
farmer, the shipper, the store. 

They, in tum, find better and cheaper 
ways to provide for consumer goods. The 
result - an Autumnal feast, celebrated by 
rich and poor nationwide. 

The Thanksgiving tradition birthed by 
America owes its allegiance not to the 
Puritans of Plymouth Rock, but to all who 
sought out the shores of the new world in 
hopes of being able to live, produce and 
Consume without interference from others 

The riches that cover our tables are not 
gifts from above as some would argue, nor 



'%*) 




JONAS 
HOGG 



in ibey results of the "American greed" 
that is the whipping boy of others, What is 
presented to us is grown from an Ameri 
can tradition of plant and harvest, 
design and market, produce and 
consume 

Empires of the past thrived on 
pillage and robbery - the depri- 
vation of the majority, for the 
benefit of the minority. No one, for 
instance, invited the Conquistadors 
( if Spy in to visit their country. 
But the empire of goods that 
flows from America and the pro 
J ik live world enrich all that touch 
it. Has there ever been a McDon- 
ald's established under force of 
arms? 

Countries and communities strive 
for McDonald's, and the fact remains 
that no two countries with McDonald's 
have ever gone to war, for they have no 
reason to. War is, was and always will be 
.1 com petition for resources. But, countries 
with McDonald's need nol murder and 
bludgeon for resources - for the produc- 
tive, resources are produced with what is 
at hand. 

ft is indisputable that where there is a 
McDonald's being built there is growth, 
consumption and wealth created through 
production 

The values that draw McDonald's 
are the same values that have driven our 
nation since it's inception. But as the sissi 
fication of the moderfi limes continues we 
find ourselves increasingly isolated from 
the ideals of consumption and production 
that make our November ritual possible 



Labor, toil and the values of being self- 
made seems to be on the wane Under the 
guise of social safety nets we lake from 
those who do produce and give to those 
who do not, thus perpetuating generations 
who depend on the state for succor rather 
than their own resourcefulness 

We find that, as Americans, produce 
less as the mechanism of government 
grows. Rather than enriching one another 
we create bureaucracies and bureaucrats 
to maneuver the ever extending nose of 
government interference into places where 
it has never been before and has no busi- 
ness being now 

We must clarify that Thanksgiving is 
the holiday of the producer, the day of 
thanks for the achievements of those that 
came before us thai provide us levels of 
comfort un imagined by even the mo m 
pampered royalty of times pasi 

So celebrate the American hentage of 
Thanksgiving! Consume greatly, produce 
more so Such is the motor which drives 
the civilization of the world. 



Jonas H 099 is » junior n sociology, International 
studies and Russian. Please tend your comments to 

opinioniitpub. kiu.edu. 




Pheasant season boosts economy 



Breathe that msp autumn air 
Hear the whisper of the wind, 
creaking limbs and rattling the rigid 
remains of a vibrant KB 
ghum crop. Close your eyes 
and pause, thankful for the 
magnanimous nature that, 
uh, naturally occurs in 
nature. 

Your best friend speaks 
His voice travels fast, very 
fast, why; it travels at the 
speed of sound through the 
crisp autumn air into your 
ear canal 

The waves do a tap dance 
on your hammer, anvil, and 
stirrup "rat-a-tal-tat, rat-tat ta-tat" In 
milliseconds, an electrical impulse 
fires through the auditory nerve to 
the brain, and the word your mind 
perceives is no longer taboo From 
the 12th of November until January's 
last day, the public accepts it. 

"Cock." 

With that melodic voice of warn, 
your sinewy muscles leap into ac- 
tion. In a flash, a trusty surface-to-air 
Browning unleashes a killer bee 
barrage of six-shot missiles. 

Clipped him - a broken wing 
Quiddy losing altitude, the offended 




LUCAS 
MADDY 



hopes that a two-legged escape may 
prove more successful 

Rapidly descending, the ring- 
necked fugitive is mere feet 
above the dense stalks of 
harvested milo. 
An eager cartridge RjpUf 
the spent round 
A heavenly safe haven of 
brush, wounded game's 
black hole of hope, lies just 
20 feet ahead 
Blaaam. 

Projectiles mow a notice- 
able swath through the milo; 
ihe vector ends precisely at 
the point of our unfortunate 
adversary's neck 

T shot The pacifier You grin 
and fetch tonight's meal, still in the 
original container. 

Though South Dakota is now the 
undisputed pheasant harvest stale, 
don't you know, Kansas is rarely 
lower than 3rd. Iowa and Nebra- 
ackacksa (sorry, something in my 
throat) also rank high 

More than 150,000 lead slingers 
annually stomp the prairie, gunning 
grouse, quelling quail, defeating 
dove and knocking more than a few 
pheasants out of the sky. Pheasant 



cash, or credit, chicken for western 
Kansas 

Nearly a third of those who come 
In boosi 1 hr most are non-Konsan, 
The economy boost is for hotels and 
restaurants, though body shops and 
hospitals also gain business 

The early reports from the foliage 
say it will be a good year for ammo 
sales, as moderate rainfall and 
decent cover has given the pheasant 
population a steady food source and 
happy habitat 

Hopefully, by my triumphant 
Christmas return, the opening- 
day diehards will have drifted 
away and left me something 
to shoot a I Perhaps a few 
words of grace are in order 
Lord, 1 pray the weath 
er*s cold 



so the pheasants hold Provideth 
tut' .11 curacy and no runners I pray 
for one-shot headshot kills, nol for 
style or flair or frills, but to keep my 
teeth when I eat my take, lesl not my 
molars by a BB break 

Bless me as 1 walk this draw, may 
the landowner not care at all And if, 
by the warden should I be caught ... 
take me now 
Amen 



lucai Maiity h a v«nior In iqricul 
tun technology management. 
Pie *s* send your (ommenti to 



pheasant dwells a return to cover in season is traditionally a proverbial 



CAMPUS FOURUM 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 




The Campus Fourum is the Collegians 
ajwnymout taU-toi system . The NW> 



i«, 



v,nc- 

Tht ctflmtfrti art not the epMM «f 
the Collegian nor are they endorsed 
bytWaJtgfiajftaff. 

■rap* to the Mley Comity PD m t*tkng 
50 drunks to drrwnome. Real smart guys. 

Kafaay ChiH nn , your article Wednesday 
real* una true. Wie « great writer and 
also very pretty Hope mh mates your day, 



Chuck NornV tears cure cancer. Too bad 
he has never cried. 

Child NerrfthainenrJy suing NBC, 
daimlng Law and Order are trademarked 
names fw Ns left and right legs 

$», Mut, wHI you, lite, hire me. lite, fur 
the job, like today 

What was the reason for my aM 
fjkjbttr one might ask, studying, stress, 
low? No, I just saw the midnight showing 
of Harry Potter in Oiathe at the IMAX. 



Does anybody 
Seal's face? 



what happened to 



Lola Shrimplln has no Ides what she 
h talking about, In one case she quotes 
Jesus out of context but in the same article 
she says she doesn't understand the BINe 
so she Is writing her own, which is It? 

God dMn't treat* homoseiualfty, ££ 
treated sexuality between a man and a 
woman in wedlock. Saying God created 

homosexuality is like saying God created 
cigarettes God created the tobacco plant 



and humans perverted It Into what It is 
today 

No Christmas musk until after Thanks- 
giving. 

Zadiary T. lekels, your article made me 
smile. If s hard being a liberal in such a 
conservative town. Boo 



rewum, threeum, twoum, orteum 
na-Bam 



Facebook caused an honor code viola 

tlonTWhat next, Facebook? What next? 

Yoda, I want. 

If one good thing can come from not 
going to a bowl game on Snyder's last 
year is that he got to coach his last game at 
home and we all were there to see it 

A K State football ticket: SSO, hot dog 

and a coke at the game: S5, seeing 
grown men cry during Snyder's farewell 
speech: priceless. 



It would have been quicker to land 
a LWeWatch helicopter in the stadium 
than to waft on the paramedics 

(hope I never get seriously injured 
In Riiey County because as long as it 
takes the EMT's to do anything I probably 
could' ve crawled to me emergency room 

Oh really? 



Need more Fourum? Go to www. 
lllMiiJLutaMomforthefuflvtniit. 



Monday, Nov. 21, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PageS 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Church cannot rewrite 
beliefs to suit society 



Editor, 

After reading Lola Shrim- 
plin's recent article, "Catho- 
lics shut doors to homosexu- 
als," I couldn't help but feel a 
bit represented as a Christian. 

The article is one of many 
articles written lately thai at 
cuse and criticize the church 
for refusing lo alluw homo- 
sexuals to become priests or 
pastors. 

It is true the church has 
struggled to accept homo- 
sexuals into their worship and 
to deal with the growing issue 
of outwardly homosexual 
believers: we are human and 
stubborn, that's why we need 
the love of God, 

However, it is the belief 
of orthodox faith that homo- 
sexuality is a perversion of 
God's natural plan of love 
.Hid sexuality 

Thus, it would be inconsis- 
tent with the church's beliefs 
to install an unrepentant 



homosexual into a place of 
authority and leadership. 

Lola is correct in saying 
that religion should not be 
"a fraternity/sorority-type 
thing," but the issue here isn't 
whether the church accepts 
homosexuals at all, but if they 
should allow them to become 
teachers of God's Word, 

It is not at all my intention 
to persuade Lola that homo- 
sexuality is a sin or that the 
church is always right in its 
actions, but simply that if you 
were to change the "rules" 
of Christianity, it would no 
longer be Christianity. 

So, if you're going (o 
criticize the church, do it on 
the basis of the hypocrisy of a 
few, but don't fault the church 
for refusing lo rewrite its own 
belief system to conform to 
the chun^inj; moral face of 
society 

Joel Adefl 

StNIQR IN MA! HEMATICS EDUCATION 



Textbook options exist 



Editor, 

I am writing in regard to 
the decreasing satisfaction 
of the textbook system that 
K Stale uses 

Students are becoming 
frustrated with spending lots 
QJ money on textbooks and 
not getting much hack in 
return The newly enforced 
return policy of Varru-y's is 
also another frustration of the 
students, Twelve days is just 
not enough time for a student 
to make a final decision on 
which classes to drop and to 
keep 

However, there is a solu- 
tion to this problem that 
NMKJj students might not be 
aware of. Several universi- 
ties around the nation use a 
library lending system to dis- 
tribute textbooks. A Student 
can check out their textbooks 
at Ihe beginning of a semester 
and return them at the end 

The only cost associated 
with this system would be 
a small textbook usage fee. 
Northwest Missouri Stl 
University has this system 



Wednesday 
November 23 



vs. 

New Mexico 

7pm 

Bramlage Coliseum 




mem 




oor. . . 



to a superior education at Dodge City Community College. 



Coming back to DCCC It a smart move for many 
reasons. Smart... 

because DCCC s low tuition and foes make it en 
excellent educational value 

because DCCC's faculty and staff cores about you end 
your success. 

Maybe you've decided the big-college atmosphere isn't 
right for you Just yet. Come back to DCCC. .get some of 
the basics out of the way. then give the university another 
try 

Whether you're laying the groundwork for a four -year 
degree, or training for a job right now, DCCC Is the place 
to make it happen 

Make the smart decision. Open the door to a superior 
education at Dodge City Community College. For more 
information, call the Admissions Office at 1 -800-367-3222, 
email admitwdc3.edu, or check out the spring semester 
schedule online at www.dc3.edu 



and they only charge $5 per 
credit hour for a textbook us- 

If this sounds like a system 
that should be implemented 

lute at K State, than I urge 
the students to make their 
voice known. 

1 he best way to go about 

Implementing this plan would 

'■ring it to Student 
Senate's attention. 

Speak your thoughts to 
your representatives on this 
subject and let's help K-State 
improve our textbook system. 

Kristin Wagnar 

JUNIOR IN MANAGf MINI 




GREAT 




EVERYONE 

GET YOUR SHOPPING DONE 

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Xmas Costume Rentals • Imports 
Men's & Women's Clothing • Posters 
• Stocking Stutters • Purses 
• Vintage 
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Holiday tied to all religions 



Editor, 

In Wednesday's column, 
Kody Cooper suggests that the 
Christian roots of Thanksgiving 
will make it the next target i it 
diversity-happy liberals aiming 
to impose their vision of politi- 
cal correctness on society While 
he's right lo point out how our 
efforts at cultural sensitivity often 
go overboard, his insinuation 
that Thanksgiving is meaningless 
or insulting to non -Christians is 
misplaced. 

Our American Thanksgiv- 
ing is tied to a long tradition of 
English harvest festivals stretch- 
ing back to pagan times For een 



tunes, people have gathered at 
this time of the year to celebrate 
harvest, family and country. 

Modem atheists, agnostics 
Wteeans, Kemetics, pnlythtists, 
Unitarian Universalists, and even 
pantheists are no exception We 
have much to be thankful for, 
since we have the good fortune 
lo live in a country where reli- 
gious freedom is respected 

Gods bless America. 

Sarah Lawyer 

MNIQHIN PHH0S0PHV, CMSIOtNI 

Clan Conner 

SOPHDMOfK IN MUSK EtHIUHON.VKt PRW0IN1 

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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Any other day Missouri's Smith would have beat the Wildcats 



Was it itiii Snyder magic 

that holped K State beat tin 
Missouri Tigers 
Saturday ? 

Sure it was 
There's really 
no oilier 
planatinn for 
it 

All SI 
long, K-Stak' 
lost games 
like the oni- 
on Samrtkiy, 

A loss lo 



(S^ 




MICHAEL 

ASHFORD 



Texas A&M came on a iiamt?- 
winning drive by the Aggies, led 
by quarterback Reggie MiNeal, 
whom the Wildcats couldn't 
slop 

A heartbreaking Ion to 
Colorado ended in the pjtmc'l 
final seconds on a field goal 
from Mason Crosby, I hanks to a 
horrible fielding error on a punt 
by return man Jerniaine Mowfcl 
(hat iictily got him killed 

Texas tech simply passed 
over, around and in between 
the Wildcats in its 59-20 win, 



and as lor Iowa State, the 
Cyclones didn't do much of 
anything wrong in their 45-17 
triumph 

But Saturday against the 
Brad Smith led Tigers, some- 
thing different was in (lie air. 

Maybe it was the emotions 
of 18 seniors playing (heir final 
game as Wildcats. Maybe it SV*S 
the K-State players refusing to 
end the 2005 season with a 
loss 

But the best explanation 
would simply be, Snyder magic 



Smith had a field day against 
the Wildcats Hi passed for 248 
Uld three touchdowns, 
an lor another 71 yard* 
and a fourth touchdown. 

An, other game this season, 
i iiiri would have left the 

field winners 

But Saturday WM different 
Snyder Family Stadium 
rocking like it hadn't in more 

than two years, and the Wild 
cats played with more emotion 

and heart and resiliency than 
they have in the last two years 



combined 

But more than that, the 

Wildcats won because they had 
to send Snyder out the right 
way. 

As junior linebacker Bran- 
don Archer streaked down the 
sideline toward the end zone 
.liter intercepting a Smith 
the atmosphere inside Snyder 
Family Stadium wus electric 
and, in Archer's terms, "surreal" 
it ihe same time, 

SeeCQlUMNPageS 



Full circle 



"When it was needed, he stepped up 

and did what we all know that he is very 

capable of doing." 

Bill Snyder 

HEAD COACH 




'The Chozen One' leads K-State 
comeback against Missouri 



By Anthony Mertdoza 

KANSAS SIATECOUEGIAN 

The tattoo on Allen Webb's 
right arm - his throwing arm 
- says "The Chozen One" 

Saturday, he was the one 
who ignited a stagnant offense 
to lead K-State back from a 14- 
point deficit to beat Missouri 
36-28 at Bill Snyder Family 
Stadium. 

Tabbed the starter at the be- 
ginning of the season by coach 
Bill Snyder, Webb found him- 
self on the sidelines for a large 
part of Big 12 Conference play 

After a poor start in the sec- 
ond game of conference play 
against Kansas, redshirt -fresh- 
man Allan Evridge took over 
in the first quarter. 

Webb may have lost his spot 
to the freshman that played a 
vital role in the Wildcats win 
over the Jayhawks, but said he 
never lo ,i Ins confidence. 

"The funny thing is I hear 



a lot of people say that (he 
lost his confidence), but that's 
not the case at all," Webb said. 
"There's always going to be 
hard critics when things aren t 
going that well, but I don't pay 
attention to it and I'm always 
going to have confidence in 
myself regardless if nobody else 
does. That's just the type of 
person that I am," 

This time around it was Evr- 
idge who struggled, and Webb 
who came in as the substitute 

Midway through the third 
quarter, the Wildcats trailed 28- 
14. Webb came off the bench 
and completed I0-of-14 passes 
for 93 yards and a touchdown 
and also rushed 14 times for 91 
yards. 

it was great to see that," 
said wide receiver lordy Nel- 
son, who pulled in Webb's 
lone touchdown pass that put 
the Wildcats ahead for good, 
29-28 "Evridge came in when 
Webb was struggling earlier in 



the year - came in and did 
some things for us. Evridge, I 
don't know what happened, 
but Webb was able to come in 
and it must have been his day, 
and I'm glad he did well when 
he came in 

i like to see that because 
he's been a little down, I think, 
since losing his start in | 
and it was great to see him 
come up and contribute to the 
win." 

In last year's game at Mis 
souri, Webb came oh* the bench 
in the third quarter and led the 
Wildcats to victory, as K-State 
outscored Ihe Tigers 28-3 in 
(he second half on the way lo 
a 35 21 win 

"When it was needed, he 
stepped up and did what we .ill 
know that lie is very capable of 
doing," Snyder said "1 appreci- 
ate that because it took an aw 
ful lot of locus on his part to 
stay attune to what was going 
on in the batlgamc" 




Photoi by Christopher Hanvwlnckal | (QUl&IAN 
TOP: K-State s Jordy Nelson celebrates with quarterback Allen Webb 
following a touchdown late In the fourth quarter. Webb came off the 
bench to complete 10 of I* passes for 93 yards. 

ABOVE: Allen Webb rushes for a few of his 91 yards Saturday against 
Missouri. K-State scored two tate touchdowns to beat Missouri In Its final 
game of the season. 



Freshman scores 24 in regular season debut 



By Anthony Mcndoza 

KANSAS STi,TK0UfGIAN 

K-State Junior Claire Coggins 

did not score her first point Sunday 

against Detroit until less than five 

minutes remained in the game with 

-re up by 2° pout* 

But the Wildcats did not need the 
honorable mention 
Big 12 Conference 
selection, as freshman 
jo Ann Hamlin scored 
the firs! 12 points of 
the game for K-State, 
making her first five 
field goal attempts 
and finishing with a 
game high 24 points 
to pace the Wildcats to a 91-55 win 
over the Titans at Bramlage Coliseum 

"I didn't need to score today, which 
ts an awesome thing," Coggins said 
"JoAnn came out hot, and we wanted 



Online 

freshman JoAnn 
HamHnoets start 
became tf wort 



it www.kst ater of - 
fefhtn.com 



to feed her. She did a great job, she's a 
big post and thai me for us" 

Tied at 17 with 10 minutes to play 
in Ihe first half, K-State went on an 8-0 
run and followed it up with another 8- 
run before the half to extend its lead 
to nine points before the break 

"We re-gained our focus," freshman 
Shalee Lchning said "For a little bit 
there, we kind of lost our focus and 
lost our intensity. When we finally 
(aimed down, and did things that we 
know how to do and the things we've 
done in practi. 

Unlike the start of the game, K State 
jumped oul in the second half and 
outscored Detroit 12-4 in the first five 
minutes, led by Hamlin, who scored 
half the points during Ihe Wildcats' 
run. 

K Stale finished off the Titans with 
12 minutes to play, ouUcoring Detroit 
24- 11 to finish the game. 

Coach Deb Patterson said she does 



not expect her team to blow anyone 
out I his season like they did last ) 

I think quite frankly, I'm expect- 
ing games to be a challenge p osse s si on 
Mon," Patterson said "I don'1 
look at it as a team that is going to lake 
the floor and wipe people oul We're 
going lo be in a lot of clu&e games." 

K State 91 Detroit 55 



It Stal* 



Free throws 
Rebounds 

Turnover. 



2-4-35 
46 
19 
17 



Detroit 
| | 

n 




leading reboundei 
Ifidtni, assists 




Chrliloptier Hirwwindwl | (OIKGIAN 
Freshman JoAnn Hamlin drives to the basket 
during the second half Sunday against Detroit. 
Hamlin led the Wildcats In scoring with 24 points 
to help K-State to a 91 55 win. 



Monday, Nov. 21,2005 

SPORTS 
ONLINE 

The K State volleyball team was able 
to steal a game from No. 1 ranked 
Nebraska, but couldn't pull off the upset 
Saturday Read more about the game at 
www.kitoiecolleqian.com 



NFL Scores 


> 


Tampa lay 
Atlanta 


JO 

27 


Miami 
Cleveland 



22 


Carolina 
Chicago 


3 
11 


Detroit 
Dallas 


7 
20 


Jacksonville 

Tennessee 


11 

28 


Arizona 

St. Louis 


M 

28 


New Orleans 17 
New England 24 


Philadelphia 
NY Giants 


17 
27 


Oakland 
Washington 


16 
H 


Pittsburgh 
Baltimor* 


1) 
16 


Stattle 17 

Sanhancisto 25 


Indianapolis 
Cindnnatl 


4S 

37 


NY Jets 
Denver 



27 


Buffalo 
SanDieft 


10 
41 


Kansas City 
Houston 


4S 

17 







1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

CFB | Public invited to 2005 
football awards ceremony 

The K-State football turn and 

reined coach Sill Snyder invite fans of 
Wildcat football to K State's annual 
awards ceremony at I: JO p.m. , on Dec 
Jin McCain Auditorium. 

The program will Include a formal 
Introduction of each team member, 
an announcement of team awards for 
the 200S season as well as a special 
recognition for those players who earn 
all-conference honors. 

Presentations will be made 
by President Jon Wefald, Athletics 
Director Tim Welser and the K-State 
coaching staff, among others. A video 
presentation will also be shown. 

Tickets are $ J for adults and J 1 
tor students with ID. Tickets may be 
purchased in advance through the 
McCain Auditorium Bo* Office or at the 
door. 

For more information, contact the 
K-State football office at 532-5876. 



TRK | Rovelto inks 
3 for 2007 season 

K-State track and field announced 
on Friday the signing of three student- 
athletes for the 2007 season. The 
Wildcats wHI welcome trie Thomas, 
Josh Mathalsmeiet and Cassie Styers to 
(he K-State campus next fall 

Thomas, a native of Hays, Kan., is a 
two-time Kansas State JA champion in 
the shot put and discus 

Mathalsmeiet is a native of 
Overland Park, Kan., and is the reNjntng 
Kansas State 6A champion in the discus 

Styers comes to the Wildcats from 
Omaha. Net, as a two-time Class A 
Nebraska state champion In the high 
fump 

K-State will begin the 2006 track 
and field season on Dec. 9-10 with the 
Carol Robinson Wintet Pentathlon and 
the K5U All-Comers. 



The Associated Press 

NFL | Johnson breaks team 
rushing record in win 

HOUSTON — Larry Johnson 
is doing his very best to ease any 
concerns the Kansas City Chiefs have 
about losing Priest Holmes 

Johnson broke the Chiefs' 
tushlng record with 211 yards and 
scored two touchdowns to lead 
Kansas City to a 45-17 win over the 
hapless Houston Texans on Sunday 
night 

the record was 200 yards, which 
Barry Word set In 1990, 

Ihe 211 yards were the most 
allowed to a single player In Texans 
history and the seventh time this 
season an opponent has gained more 
than 100 yards against the Texans' 
league worst run defense. 

Tony Gonzalez became the first 
tight end to top 50 catches in eight 
consecutive seasons. Gonzalez was 
tied with Shannon Sharpe, who 
accomplished the feat with Denvet 
between 1992 9* 



College Football 
APTopIO 



i (oaJmCaf 

2. Texas 

i ISU 

4 Penn Slate 

$ VJnjmtafKh 

6 Notre Dame 

7 OMoState 

8 Oregon 

9. Auburn 

10. Miami (Ha ) 



Other Kg 12 i«ms 
ll.Tmitedi 



11-0 
104 

9-1 

10-1 

9-1 

8-2 

9-2 

10-1 

9-2 

8-1 



M 









ART % | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | fOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Monday, Nov. 21, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 






Picture perfect 









7 


1 M w^ r WH 


pV 

r. 




* 


-fn Ti 




■ p 


m 41 


L 


* ■WWK7 w *' w ' 


~^3V 




Photoj by Christopher Hanewlnckel | (0! I K.IAN 
WRONG: Don't shoot the obvious shot Your photos may look posed. 



RIGHT- Look for new angles from which to shoot. It adds more variety to your photos. 



Avoid poses, explore new locations to spice up photos 



By Christina Hansen 
KANSAS STATE COUKIAN 

The holiday season is just around the 
corner. With all of the gift -giving, parties 
and family get-togethers, plenty of pho- 
tographs can capture Die memories 

Instead of taking the usual stiffly 
posed portraits that fill the family album, 
students can consider following a few of 
the tips from two K-State students with 
a passion for photography. 

TIP 1; ZOOM IN ON THE SUBJECT 

"A lot of people like to keep their 
distance when taking pictures," said Au- 
drey Young, senior in agricultural com- 
munication and journalism, Young's 
photos are currently part of a display 
on the second floor of Kedzie Hall, "But 
close-ups have better quality" 

Focusing in on a specific person or 
object not only portrays more detail, it 
eliminates background elements that 
can distract from the photo's subject, 
Young said. 



TIP 2: DON'T TAKE THE OBVIOUS 
SHOT 

Do not ask Friends and family to 
stand next to the Christ nag ti 

every single photograph 

Katie Pavlish, junior m art, is cur- 
rently photographing hi enees 
and travels as she studi d this 
semester in London. Sh. aiding 
photographers should not be afraid to 
experiment with a phut,- 

"Try to find interesting picture! that 
aren't in obvious spots ovrioui mean- 
ing someplace that e very on c 
Pavlish said. "I would n I tak 

ing photos at all times in all plu> 

TIP 3: DON'T SAY CHEESE 

"Avoid posed pictOl » the 

unique moment,'' Young said 

Instead of asking people Uj Itop what 
they're doing to take a picture, capture 

their activities and expressions without 
intruding The photos will look more 
natural, and each picture will be distinct 



from the next. 

TIP 4: STICK WITH COLOR 
PHOTOS 

Pavlish said that while black and 
white photos can Larry a nostalgic qual- 
iiv she would recommend color film to 
ur photographers 
i can always use Photoshop to 
scan photos and change them to black 
and white later on," she said. "This 
l be much more difficult if you 
want to change a black and white photo- 
graph to color It's virtually impossible" 

TIP S: FIND THE CAMERA THAT'S 
RIGHT FOR YOU 

There is not ft single camera out there 
that ix nght for every single person, 

it really is a personal preference," 
Pavlish said "I definitely recommend 

ng your research before taking the 
plunge and buying a very expensive 
piece of equipment Don't be scared to 
use different cameras and see which one 
you like the best." 



If people are still not ready to invest 
in a camera just yet, Young said that 
one-time-use cameras are also a viable 
option 

"You can get reasonable pictures 
from a onetime-use camera," she said. 
"They're obviously not professional 
quality, but they're fine for taking pic- 
tures of family and friends" 

TIP 6: TAKE PLENTY OF 
PICTURES 

"Lots of times, getting the good pic- 
tures, the perfect pictures, is just a mat- 
ter of luck," said Young. "Taking a lot of 
them increases your chances of finding 
that picture" 

Pavlish said that even experienced 
photographers aren't satisfied to quit 
after taking one or two shots of a de- 
sired subject 

"Being in Photo I at K-State, 1 remem- 
ber having to take at least three rolls of 
film in order to get one great photo," she 
said. "It's not about just taking photos, 
it's about learning from them." 



WRONG: 
Don't pose 
your shots, 

they look 
fake. 



RIGHT: Shoot 

people 

actually doing 

something, it 
looks real and 
adds emotion, 





WRONG: 
Don't 
stand far 
away to 
take a 
photo, 
you lose 
Important 
details. 




Latest 'Harry Potter' film good holiday entertainment 



"Harry Potter 
and the Goblet of Fire" 

***** 

Movie imltw by Jettann* Birn»i 



As a Harry Potter purist, 1 
was curious to see how Warner 
Brothers planned to condense a 
700-plus page book into a two- 
and-a-half hour movie. 

Keeping this in mind, I was 
impressed with the way director 
Mike Newell and screenwriter 
Steve Kloves managed to sum- 
marize such a huge novel into 
something manageable for the 
average movie going audience. 

The most obvious difference 
between this movie and the 
previous three is the darker tone 
the film immediately takes 



I n the opening scene, Harry 
Potter, played by Daniel Rad- 
cliffe, dreams about an aban- 
doned house where his nemesis, 
the evil Lord Voldemort, played 
by Ralph Finnes, is plotting his 
restoration to power 

From there the audience is 
taken to the Quiddhch World 
Cup, where we sec the extent 
of the wizarding world's love of 
Quidditch, the sport played on 
broomsticks. 

This could have been an 
amazing scene, but rather than 
showing us even part of the 
game, it cuts away to 8m post' 
game celebration, which turns 
into a riot caused by Voldemort's 
followers, the Dealh Eaters 

As always, a new Defense 
Against the Dark Arts professor 
arrives at Hogwarts School of 
Witchcraft and Wizardry, as well 
as students from two other magi- 
cal academies, Beauxbatons and 




Dunmirang, who have come to 
Hogwarts to participate in the 
Tri-Wizard Tournament, which 
will pit a student from each 
school aguinst the others in a 



series of tasks to test the magical 
skill and resourcefulness of each. 
The winner of the Tournament 
will receive "denial glory.' in 
the words of Albus Dumbledore, 
played by Michael Gambon. 

The plot thickens when in- 
stead of three students, tbe Gob- 
let of Fire names four whu will 
participate in the Tournament 
- the extra being Harry himself. 

The climax of the film is 
beautifully rendered, with amaz- 
ing special effects showing the 
reincarnation of Lord Voldemort 
and an incredible performance 
from Finnes 

Harry and his friends have 
begun to grow up in this fourth 
installment of author IK Row I 
ing's series, obvious not only by 
the aging of the actors, but also 
the subject matter. Harry has his 
first cnish, Hermione goes on 
her first date and Ron begins to 
show signs of jealousy, 



Overall, I enjoyed the film. 
My main complaint was the 
rushed quality it seemed to 
have Scenes were very brief and 
seemed choppy 

Occasionally, events were 
poorly explained and hurried So 
much happens so quickly that 
sometimes its hard to keep it all 
straight 

Although I have read the 
book, I occasionally had a hard 
time following the storyline, 
due to the massive amount of 
information (hat had to be cut or 
rearranged to make the storyline 
make sense, 

True Harry Potter fans may 
have a problem with how much 
was cut and how much was 
changed, but overall I think 
"Harry Potter and the Goblet of 
Fire" is a good representation of 
the novel as well as a generally 
entertaining film, even if you 
haven't read the book. 



FAMOUS 
QUOTES 



"Well, we're living in a material world, 
and I'm a material girl ... or boy" 

— Mam Sandler 

"I think my whole generation's mission 
is to hlill the clich*" 

— K«di 

"You can't be greater than Elvis, change 
things as much as the Beatles or be as 
original as Led Zeppelin. All you can do 
is rip them off" 

— Billy Cergan 

"One good thing about music, when it 
hits, you feel no pain" 

— fte«Mari«y 

"If a woman tells you she's 20 and looks 
16, she's U If she tetls you she's 26 and 
looks 26, she's damn near 40" 

— Chris Rock 



"I'm only two 
years older than 
Brad Pitt, but 1 
look a lot older, 
which used to 
greatly frustrate 
me It doesn't 
anymore. I don't 
have to fit into 
that category and 
get trounced by 
Tom Cruise and Brad* 
— George Ckteney 




Clooney 



"We're In the dark ages if J Lo can have 
a music carter because of her ass. And 
let's face tt, that's if 
— lad Black 

'Maybe there is no actual place called 
hell. Maybe hell Is just having to listen to 
our grandparents breathe through their 
noses when they're eating sandwiches " 
^ Jrffl Carrey 



"My hat was 

pulled down and 
this girl said 'Are 
you really hlmr" I 
whispered "Yeah, 
I'm really him.' 
She screamed, 
Mom! Dadl It's 
Heath Ledger"" 
— Josh 
Hartnert 




Hartnett 



"1 brought you a tuna sandwich. They 
say ffs brain food I guess because 
there's so much dolphin In It, and you 
know how smart they are" 
— Marge Simpson 

"I don't really trust men who dalm they 
are not Interested in pom* 



"Britney would make a better prostitute 
than Christina She's thicker." 

— Snoop Dogg 

"My boyfriend calls me princess', but I 
think of myself more along the lines of 
'monkey' and 'retard"' 

— Alicia Sllverctone 

"If everyone really knew what a jerk I 
am In real life, I wouldn't be so adored in 
the slightest" 

— Christian Bale 

"God made a very 

obvious choice 

when he made 

me voluptuous, 

why would I go 

against what he 

decided for me? 

My limbs work, so 

I'm not going to 

complain about Barrymore 

the way my body 

is shaped " 

— Drew Barrymore 

"I ask people why they have deer heads 
on their walls They always say because 
it's such a beautiful animal. There you 
go. I think my mother is attractive, but I 
have photographs of her" 

— Ellen Degeneres 



"I don't particu- 
larly like babies. I 
don't mind them 
tor about four 
minutes. That's my 
max. After thai 
I can't quite see 
what everyone's 
fussing about" 
— Hugh Grant 





Grant 



"Poverty is a lot like childbirth 

— you know it is going to hurt before 
it happens, but you'll never know how 
much until you experience It" 

— J. K. Rowling 

"I tell you what really turns my toes 
up: love sttfies with 68-year-old men 
and actresses young enough to be their 
granddaughter" 
-Mel Gibson 

jM&to: wwto.twwwhiLtojA 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 21. 2005 



Martin scores career-high 24 points in season opener 



K-State's Cartler Martin 
puts up a shot against a 
Georgia Southern oppo- 
nent Friday evening at 
Bramlage Coliseum. The 
Wildcats won 83 58. 

Catrlna Rawson 
C0UK.IAN 




By Mark Potter 
KANSAS SIAIt COllFGIAN 

seven new players, a 
iiai offense and iiu- departure 
ol ii> twi. leading scorers and 
rcboundcrs, ilu' 
K-Statc men Online 
basketball learn K- State's detcnw 
005- Whonalk/lm- 

06 se« again*! ilers in win. Rpad 

Georgia Si uth morcil www. 
urn b'nday night kuatmlleqom. 
with a number ol (om, 
unknowns. 

luninr for- 
ward Cartler Martin provided an 
amwei ai to who wnuid lead the 
Wildcats in scoring in their home 
i>i Hiring in j career hijih 

its OH 8 

shooting. 

Martin also paced K Stale 
with 11 rebounds and six assists 

Marl iii\ performance helped 
K-Slate (Id) cruise past Georgia 



Southern (1-2)83-58. 

K-Siate led 9-7 in the first hall 
before compiling a 21-5 run on 
(he .strength of three fast-break 
dunks by juniors lyicr I [ughes, 
L anee Harris and transfer Beige 
Aleli 

by halflime, K-Slate led 43- 
21 and scored lr» points on fast 
breaks compared to two fast- 
break points for Georgia South- 
ern 

Martin said coach |im 
Wooldridge stressed the impor- 
tance of transition baskets in 
practice. Which paid off on both 
ends of the court. 

"We made an emphasis on 
getting down I he court as last as 
we could, stopping the ball and 
making them play half court," 
Martin said. 

pa Southern inched its 
way back after halftime. closing 
ilbin 14 points at 67- l >3 with 
five minutes remaining 



K Stale responded with an H- 
2 run to put the game away. 

Georgia Southern, a team 
thai was tied with Texas Tech 
at halftime in Lubbock, Texas, 
last week, was led in scoring by 
5-foot-9 senior guard Elton Nes- 
bitt 

Nesbitt scored 1ft points, 
but Stewart and h-foot-ft junior 
Akeem Wright held him to 4- 17 
shooting. 

Wright, a junior college trans- 
fer from Philadelphia, Pa., played 
a team-high 3ft minutes. 

"I did not expect to play thai 
many minutes, but I played good 
defense on Nesbitt, so 1 guess 
that's why (Wooldridge) kept me 
out there longer," Wright said. 

Wooldridge said despite a few 
lapses, his team gave a great ef- 
fort. 

"I thought we did what we 
wanted to do or needed to do to 
put together a good game, and 



take their strength and defend 
it," Wooldridge said 

The Wildcats are 5-1 in open 
ing games under Wooldridge. 

K Stale's next game is ai 
home Nov. 25 against New Mex- 
ico 

K State 83 Geo South 58 



EQUESIRJM 



Team ends season with win 



By Jessica Barnard 

KANSAS SIM I :(0l UfMN 

The K state equestrian 
was nearly perfect this \\ 
end at the Black I lawk Western 
Show 

Hie Western team traveled 

to Kewannee, 111, to compete 

na1 nine other teams from 

their region on Salurd.i> BIKJ 

Sunday. 

After beating rtOSl teem 
Hi ick I lawk hy 13 points in 
Ihe first show mi Saturday the 
CstS came hack DTI Sunday to 
gain an even larger lead in the 
region 

K-Stale finished the show 

on Sundae wad d ores 

in five out ol si\ classes, ending 
the day jusl four poinls short of 
an overall perfect team score. 
Coach Teresa Slough said 

she vs js pleased Willi tlic lum J 
performance on Saturday 
"On Saturday, we did I 

she said "We were solid 



and wt- Wl I tent" 

Along with winning both 
shows, two K State rideis, 
f.indsey Salshury and Und.se) 
Hicks, earned High Point 
High Point Reserve liider Hon- 
ors on both days of competi- 
tion. 

i m Saturday, Salsbur] 
named High Point Rider, wink 
Hicks was Reserve High Point 

Rider, But on Sunday Hi 
earned the High Point Ridci 
honor and Salsbury was named 
the Reserve High Point Rider 

Hicks uid she was jjlad to 
help the team by earning the 
High Point honor. 

"It's wonderful to hav< 
honor, and to help 
ute those points to our tea 
Hicks sjid 

Along with the exciti 
ol winning High Point Honor*, 
SaJsburj said she was I 
end the fall season with a win 
black Hawk 

"I'm pretty glad we i 



OLSON' S 

Thanks you 

for your.. - 

continued 
support. 

Have a wonderful 
Holiday Season! 




1214BMoro 

Manhattan, KS 66502 

phone: 785-539-857) 

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Bj winning both days o| 
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COLUMN 

helps team win 

Continued from Page 6 

|i was the beginning of the 

m<\ The Wildcats led 3r>28, 
and Snyder's limu at K-Slate 
was coining lo an unbeliev- 
able close 

Win No. 136 was quite 
possibly the most memorable 

game in Snyder's 17 year ten 
ure It certainly rivaled wins 
No I against North Icsjs 

21 against W\ o 

ming in the Copper Howl. No. 
7b in 14UH against Nebraska 
\»i I?? against No, i 

ranked Oklahoma lo win the 
Rig 12 Conference Champion 
ship 

Ask any K Stale Ian and 

Snyder 

did k>r K Stale - ihc uni- 



'Snyder magic' 
coach's final game 





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- was magical All 136 wins, 
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considering where K-SUik 
had come from, where even 
one win was cause for cel- 
ebration. 

Was it Snyder magic lhal 
helped K State defeat Mis 
souri? 

Was there ever any doubt'' 

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Monday, Nov. 2 1, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



Boy receives football-themed room Catbacker clubs 

enjoy K-State sports 



By Kaley Lyon 
KANSAS S1ATEC0UF.GIAN 

Luke Simmer's jaw dropped 
open when he stepped through 
the doorway of his newly re- 
furnished bedroom, which was 
decorated in a football -theme 
Family members, carpenters and 
designers crowded in behind him 
to celebrate the occasion 

"It's awesome," were the only 
words the 12-year-old boy could 
manage. 

Everything in the bedroom 
was new, from the Hours and the 
freshly painted walls to the foot* 
ball stadium-themed bed, which 
was designed to represent wood 
en bleachers, with a pull out full- 
sized bed underneath. 

A new lelevishin get, subwoof- 
Ors and surrourul sound, noted 
on the new entertainment center 
and storage unit, which was com- 
posed of refurbished lockers from 
Wflnegn High School. 

| Everything in the room was 
personalized, from the window 
draperies, and it was better than 
expected, Luke said 
- Make- A -Wish foundation, a 
national organization with [he 



mission of granting the wishes 
of children with liie-direuten- 
ing medical conditions, had sent 
two Kansjs representatives to the 
Simmers' Wamego, Kan., home 
to make Luke's wish come true. 

After being diagnosed with 
cancer last spring, Simmer was 
hospitalized in The Children's 
Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, 
Mo, While hospitalized, he was 
interviewed by Wish Grantors. 

The Wish Grantors asked 
him questions about places he'd 
like to travel, what he wants lo 
be, people he'd like to meet and 
lings he'd like lo have, 

Luke also Tilled out a ques- 
tionnaire so the foundation could 
leam aboul his favorite things 
and personal information. From 
Hits introductory interview, the 
Wish Grantors determined how 
lo make Stnwu t a wish i reality 

Luke Simmer adores football 
and was played for the Wunegp 
Middle Sri tool team for the first 
time this year His dre;nn ! 
\>U\ tor K-State, he said. 

"He's doing really well," San- 
dy Simmer, Lukes mother, laid 
"It was amazing to see him gel 
through this Luke's determm a 




Steven Doll | (.OlltGlAN 

After seeing his newly renovated room, Luke Simmer, 12, whn was 
diagnosed with cancer last spring, hugs one of his Wish Grantors. Oarcy 
Hale, of Make -a Wish Foundation of Kansas, who helped re -decorate 
Luke's room with a football theme for him. Simmer is a football fan and 
wanted to have his room renovated with a football theme. 



lion was what got him through 
He was determined to play loot 

ball, and he got to play fool bull 

Wish Grantors Dawn l>< 
of Wainego, and Darcy Hah- ot 
Kansas City, Kan., transformed 
the room inlo ;i football haven 



"I kind of am just artistic, and 
when I got the heads up that he 
was so into football, bis favorite 
color is red, he played football 
for the Wamego Red Raiders, (he 
whole thing just came together," 
DeBord. room designer, said 



By Lacey D. Ma t key 

MNSmiAN lOUFGIAN 

Watching games and follow 
ing K-Stiitc athletics is more 
thin just a pastime for I group 
of alumni - it's a passion 

UNI Floyd, assistant athletic 
director and director ol (.'.it 
backer Clubs, said a Catbacker 
is *a dedicated, enthusiastic 
devoted, adorned in purple, 
fun -loving, loyal, spirited, tail- 
gate-loving purple person dedl 
Lilted to helping the alhti I 
Kansas State attain iheir follrst 
potential" 

With the recent l e tuan e m of 
o «ch dill Snyder, Floyd said the 
Catbackers have Ih'cii touched 
with the time and talks the Sny 
der provided for the group 

"He spoke lo every club 
meeting multiple times," Floyd 
said. "Coach Snyder comes to 
the little towns Hcs.nd. Wher 
ever there are K- Slaters. I'll go.' 
He never said no to me.' 

Beginning in 1956 with 



a small group of Manhattan 
men. the club now includes 28 
groups in Kansas and one in 
Nebraska. 

Hie Catbackers keep busy 
with tailgates and weekly meet- 
ings, and also work to raise mon- 
ey for the Aheum Scholarship 
Fund, adding about $200,000 to 
athletic scholarships each year. 
i itii the groupe, i want 

you to have fun, but I also want 
you lo raise some funds," Floyd 
said 

Bryan Slenfors, vice presi- 
dent of the Kansas L'ily area 
Catbackers, said he is a football 
but the club gives him a 
perspective on K State athlet- 

"The i atbaefcert do a really 
good job ol giving you a look 

at the athletic department as a 

whole," Stenfon said. "We have 
the tennis coaches, the rowing 
coaches come in It's interest- 
ing lo hear what all else goes 

on 11 icy give a pretty good in- 
depth look" 



MENS BASKETBALL LEAGUE 

Wamego Recreation is seeking entries for our Men's Basketball League, Registration began 
Monday, October 31 and will continue until Friday, Novembet 25. Registration is $200 pet 
team, t runei will lv played on Sunday afternoon/eveninaa starting Sunday. Dt I ami 

running through the beginning of March . Tc.irn rcpre* meeting will be- on Monday. 

November 28 ai 6:30 pro in the Wamego Gtyl 




EMPLOYME NT OPPORTUNITIES 

Recreation office b - ■ lo")' OEHf '.1A1 A (prefer High School certifies) for our M< i 
Basketball I eague. I Iffkiab will be paid HQ/gatne (certified) and SlVgame (non-certifies). 

It you arc interested in the*: emiiluyment opportunities, | act the Warnegn R 

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7:30pm 



WILDCAT WEEKEND 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26 





fN ADVANCE: 
TicketM aster Tickets: 

-Students w/KSU student ID S8.50 

plus service fees 

•Non-student $13.50 plus service fees 

DAY OF: 

-For students w/KSU student ID: $10 

plus service tees 

-Non-students $15 plus servtce fees 



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Holidays at the Manhattan Arts Center 



. Wrap It Up 

Art Exhibit 8c Sale 




Unique gifts for Die holidays 
- /fat* items on display d. 
M-F 10-5. Sot 104, Sun 124 



Calendar of Events 



Dec 2 8 pm 

Swing City Jazz. KSU Student Combos 



* 



Dec 3 ■ 3 pm Children's Show • 8 pm Evening Show 

BtrdHouse Acoustic Muse: Zoe Lewis 

Dec 4 u 7 pm 

Hear and Now: Staged readings of "Couples" 

Directed by Maggie Jackson 

Dec 10 ■ 7 pm 

Merry HanuKwanzMas Multicultural Celebration 

Dec 16 & 17° 7 pm 

Family Christmas Show— Starring Manhattan youth' 

Dec 31 ■ 8 pm - 1 am 

Captain's Ball: New Year's Celebration with dancing, 

food, and fun! 



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- 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov, 21,2005 



Engineers compete for charity 



By Hannah Crippen 

KANsASVUTKOIli&lAN 

Tan liela Pi, llit I ngineering 
honor so illege 

ol Bngitteeiinj collected 2.500 

pi minis (if food and $497 for 
the I lint Hills Breadbasket In 

ii;i\ iftemoon 

Tilling up two truckloads of 

donated (bod each ol the eight 
departments in the College ol 
i ngineering competed to Mi 

win i could collect tlu must 

cam tin winners were the 
departments ol Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering and 
Architectural Engineering and 
c i instruction Science 

Ryan White, senior in me- 
chanical engineering and vice 
preiident elect ol Tau Beta Pi. 
participated in Friday's event m 
Seaton Hall He (aid the engi- 
neers have been doing this for 
years right before Thanksgiv- 
ing 

Depending on what type 
of food item the organization 
receives, ii uill go toward 
Thanksgiving or Holiday food 

basket or Mured fur the winter 
months and distributed fcbotit 
2.00U baskets are given nui 
each year 

Natascha Phillip execu- 
tive director of the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket, said (he food bas- 
kets contain everythlnj a b 
ily would need for an entire 
holiday meal the si/e of the 
basket is based on the number 
Ol people in the tamiK 

Phillip said the orgam/.i 
t n m relies greatly on commu- 
nity Vidii' . its itafl 
consists of only four people 



She said K-State student orga- 
nizations are among the many 
donors in Manhattan. 

"The college students are 
struggling themselves' Phillip 
said. "To donate to the less for- 
tunate, we find that amazing 
Thai's what makes Manhattan 
lUch a special community The 
volunteer-community donors 
are what makes us work.' 

While said this event should 
continue Ifl the (oture. and he 
hopes the College of Engineer- 
ing is selling an example for the 
K Male community, 

We want to show that we 
are community aware." White 
said 

Emily Frcy, junior in civil en- 
gineering, said it is thoughtful 
nf the students to donate their 
time and money to the hungry 
in Manhattan 

"It's great that the College 
of Engineering is doing this for 
the community, and it's fun for 
us because we get to compete 
■gainst the other departments. 
Frev said 

In 2004, the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket collected about 
I 6 million pounds of food and 
fed 31,147 families, according 
to the organization's Web site 
at 
breadbasket manhattanks org 

"The food collected in Man- 
hattan stays in Manhattan," 
Phillip said 

About 20 percent of Hi ley 
County citizens live at or below 
the poverty level, 

"I know the holidays can be 
especially hard for people BO 
this is a great lime for people to 
be donating," Frey said 




Steven Doll | (OUtGIAN 
Taking a box from Dan Wright, senior in electrical engineering, Matt Ed- 
wards, fifth-year senior in architectural engineering, finds a place for a 
box of canned goods while loading up a truck to deliver the food Friday 
afternoon outside Seaton Hall for the Flint Hills Breadbasket. Tau Beta 
Pi and the College of Engineering collected food for a week to donate. 



Shots fired inside shopping mall; hostages taken 



By Rachel La Corte 

MSOCIAUD PRESS 

TACOMA. Wash - A gun 
man opened Bre Inside a busy 
shopping mall Sunday, wound- 
ing several people in the halls 
and taking three people hostage 
in a music store before police 
arrested him, authorities said 

witnesses described hearing 
a noise and then seeing a man 

Ling hackwurd through the 
mall, firing 

At least six people were In- 
jured, one critically, as shoppers 
and store clerks scrambled 



for cover 

Tacoma Police spokesman 
Mark Fulghum said the sus- 
pect, arrested about four hours 
alter the shouting began, was 
a young man but Fulghum had 
no other details about him or 
his possible motives. 

Police were interviewing the 
victims and hostages, he said 

While the suspect was still 
inside the Sam Goody music 
sture, employee )oe Hudson 
was able to pick up the phone 
and say he and others had been 
taken hostage 

Authorities got the call 



Crossing your 



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about 12:15 p.m that shots had 
been fired inside the Tacoma 
Mall. The caller said there was 
a gunman, "He was in the mall, 
walking along, firing," Fulghum 
said. 

Inside the mall, Stacy Wil- 
son, 29, of Bonney Lake, heard 
a popping noise and turned 
around 

"1 saw the gunman ran 
domly shooting I ran with a 
group ol women to Victoria's 
Secret," WilSOfl said She said 
they crouched behind a wall in 
the store, and when the shoot- 
ing stopped, an employee ran 
out and closed a security gate 
at the front. 



He was walking backward 
and shooting I couldn't see his 
face,' She said "Everyone was 
running and screaming ." 

Bets Dejamatt, who works 
at the | C Penney store said 
workers were herded Into 
dressing rooms and offi 
then police tOOk them outside 
to a parking lot 

Sn people were taken to 
hospitals, most with minor Inju- 
ries, according to Tacoma Fire 
Department Deputy Chief John 
LendOSk) One person was in 
critical condition at Tacoma 
General Hospital, spokesman 
Todd Keltev said 




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Students share 
in praise, worship 




Christopher Hanewinckel | CHI Mil A', 
Pastor Larry Jones gives a message about the power of unity Satur- 
day night during the Praise, Power and Prayer In (he K-State Student 
Union Little Theatre. 



By Chuck Armstrong 

KANSAS STAUCOUl&IAN 

The power of on ily was the 
| [ones spread 
ill I 'raise, Power and I' 
Saturday night in the K- Stale 
Student Union Little Theatre 

"You know who people 
by what's: coming nut Irom the 
inside," |onet said All you 
hear about college is drups 
and drinking, you don I hear 
about tin 

The interdenominational 
worship service included 

[onus, tlu campus ministry 
Workers of Wisdom Empo- 
ria Slate University's Harmo- 
nious Voices nf Pi 
band Sounds N I'n ■ 
a I'raiM. I'm. 

Bryon v 
of WOW, said the group div 
tributed more than 1 ,400 fly- 



ers for the event 

"The Word of God was just 
great," he said -'We're going in 
the right di ret lion to unite the 
campus in pra* 

The evening began with 
worship led by four students 
from Emporia State's Harmo- 
nious Voices of Praise 

A Pr&isC Dance team made 
up of three WOW members 
performed an interpretive 
dance tos song that thanked 
God 

Tin' imai evenl ol the 
was a group prayer thai in 
volved the audience [oinirif 
in a circle and praying 
»,viih (ones for K-Statc minis, 
tries and students 

Jones said lu* enjoyed the 
youth ft Dowshlp ai tlu event- 

n was s blessing to -.ec 

One come together and 

praise God* he said 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



ie 11 



I I I I !_ || I I I I 

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THREE AND lour bedroom 
duplexes Walk to class No 
smoking, no drinking, no 
pets (785)539-1554 

two on thrM Bedroom 
close to campus Spacious, 
central air, dishwasher 
laundry (acuity Water and 
trash paid 1785)539-0666 




For Ront- 
Houses 

TO campus. Three - 
bedroom, balhroon 
en dinette, den, attached 
garage (765)463-5014 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 
balhs, (wo kitchens, very 
Close 10 campus (785)776- 
B62B. (785)34* -4073 

HOUSES FOR rent Close 
to campus Three lour or 
nve-bedfoorti (877)439- 
4038 

ONE BEDROOM WALK lo 
class No smoking, no drink - 
85)539- 
1 554 

THREE BEDROOM DU* 

PLEX, 2303 Anderson 
$600. available December 
17 1/8^5:17-7136 



0321 

Shout 
OuJb 

The Collegian reserves 
the right to edit or reject 
ad copy. First or last 
names can be accepted in 
ad copy Pfiolo ID re- 
quired at placement Ad* 
can be placed in 103 Ked- 
tie Hall, $2 tor up to 20 
words 



ATTENTION I 

[tatl IS rrtndi inning 

909 Kearney due to unianl- 

■ 

can wf count an Wool 
dodge lo retire at the end of 
Mi MHI tooft 

i, LENT B My Mps would 

meet yours, but lets 

wail until the season is over 

GET A clue* Hung up yuur 
Cei' phon* and mom 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY 
Aaron, even thougfi 
lie late Knsten 



HAPPY THANKSGIVING. 
Pam Ruth, Mltl. BOM 
Deb. Carol 

I LOVE a clean cut ag guy 
wrth tight jeuns and a big 
belt buckle Makes me toel 
like Rodeo season 

i i evE fumes; pajnt, gaso- 
line, polish remover, marker 

but can't do smoke lurries 

I, 

I I'jl ok lo smoke with- 
in 30 feel of an entrance 
how can you gel away with 
smoking inside Fairchild? 



STEWART HOT On 

court and oft the court 



the 



KODY KOOPEP. y 

dee art absolutely temble 

but I love them anyw.ry 

PAYSON MICKELSON. 
Coudnoy and Erin are the 
hottest ad reps to aver be 

■jaj ■ 

STOP BY 1011 lor boner 

hou 

THANKS COACH i Great 
party the last 1 7 years, party 

WAY TO go Wildcats, great 
win at (he end of the sea 
son 




010 



Announcemenls 



"LEARN TO FLYI- K State 
Flying Club has live air 
planes and lowest rales 
Call (785)776(744, 

www.kMiml; 



«rtw uoDuyisxurri 
OUT Manhattan's lavoriU 
restaurant and bar webefle 
Lots Ol specials, entertain 
moot, I ihtrta, and gift certifi- 



rt 



Post a (Mote 

We require a form of pic- 
lure ID (KSU. driver* li- 
cense or other) when plac 
ing a post ■ note. 



1101 
Fot Rent- 
Apt. 

Unlurnisriecl 




020 I 



Lost and Found 

Lost and found ads can be 
pieced free for three days. 



For Rent- 
Apts Furnished 

Manhattan Cily Ordinance 
4814 assures every per 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account ol race, 
sea. familial status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age, color, national 
origin or ancestry. Viola 
bona should be reported 
to the Director of Human 
Resources at City Hall, 
(785)587 2440. 



WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 

Anderson Village 

1 BD-1BA 
$460 tor January 

1507 Puynl* #1 

2 BO 1600 

NFW carpet ft paint 

Gas ft water paid 

1S09PoynU 

t LG BD O J52S 

Washer A Dryer 

ALL Utilities PAID 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt, 

Unfurnished 



AVAILABLE SOON 1019 
Houston, f 2 Three-bed- 
room duplex plus day room 
Screened back por. i 
en appliances $695 Closu 
W downtown City Park end 
Aggieville (785)341 1389 



GREA1 r.il Ai ■ r-.iudio apa*1< 
mont available January l 
Five or seven month teste 
$340 all utilities paid 
(785)41 0-t>3b I or (785)341 
4754 

JANUARY LEASE Twu 
bedroom two Oath apart 
merit Brand new, great lo- 
cation Two block 
campus One block from Ag 
giovide All appliances in- 
cluding washer/ dryer 
(785)317-5326 or (316)640- 
18fl r . 



MONTH- MONTH Leases 
Two-tmdroom $S?ti 
bedroom, $620 I5t0 Col- 
lege Av* (78 1)537- JOftft. 



Roommate 
Wanted 



WALK to class No smoking, 
no drinking, no pets 
(785)539-1554 



1 50 ! 



Sublease 



Roommate 
Wanted 

FEMALE FOR January- 
May Two-bedroom house, 
dose to campus, $275/ 
month plus utilities Washer/ 
dryer Call Megan (785)906 
0131 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed Available Decem- 
ber 15 January lo May 
lonth Pets allowed 
Thurston Call 

(785(341 1073 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to share two-bed- 
room apartment $280/ 
month split electnc and ca- 
ble bill Call Megan at 
■i: . 75<M»7C 

FEMAIF ROOMMATE 
Three-bedroom 
apartment half block from 
campus $250/ month plus 
one-thira utilities Call 
1785)342-1554 

FEMALE ROOMMATE No 
smokinq Two-bedroom 

apartment Close to cam- 
pus Off street parking 
Washer/ dryer Available im 
mediatory (620148* 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed Fun, out-going no 
pets Two-bedrooms availa- 
ble $300/ each (913)486- 
2746 

LOOKING FOR a roommate 
tot a four-bedroom duplex 
Available as soon as possi- 
ble 1112 Vattler Call Jason 
(785)443-3306 

MALL HCIOMMATE needed 
tor large two-bedroom, one 
bath apartment m West- 
chester Park 

renter available nnw. Tyler 
(7851539 8773 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

$350 one-hall uHHtie- Scoil 

I 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
lour bedroom house, block 
(mm tin i Hi is. utll 

rtlns (620)854-6044 

SUBLEASER FOR one ol 
tour bedrooms. Ui 

i Begins January 
$275 monthly Cable, trash, 
washer' dryer furnished 

piBW&o-esea 



from January August 2008 
Four -bedroom, two bath- 
room, new carpet $350/ 
month Moore i 
Management |785)537- 

oaoa 

ONE BEDROOM APAR1 
MENT $325/ month, water 
and trash paid < 
campus Available January 
i (negotiable) Cad 
(573)718-7321 or 

ai>7333\j Ksu.edu 

ONE BEDROOM CHAS1 
Manhattan Apartments 
available Jan If) 
(785)539-8366 Wan 

osjd. Pet*, i km ' 

SUBLEASER NEEDED for 
one room in a three-bed- 
room house on LeGore 
Lane Available at end ot 
December until end ol inly 
Call (913)206-2962 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
two -bedroom apartment. 
Chase Manhattan apart- 
ments Wifl pay January rent 
if signed by December Call 
(785)871-0738, (785)871 
1553 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
One-bedroom apartment 
Available December I? 
May $490/ monlb Pels al- 
lowed lor $25/ month Gas 
and water paid Laundry ta 

Pool Call i ' 
1939 

SUBLEASING A two bed- 
more information 
(620)276-4940 

PrVO UEDRQOM APART 
MENT $400/ month at 1026 
BertrarvJ upper apartment 
From January through May 
830)718- 
6858 

TWO BEDROOM SPA 
CIO US ■partrntfTl iubtease 
January 1- May 31 $285/ 
person Dishwasher, central 
heal/ air Five nwute walk 
n 1 785)537 -6880 



3101 



Help Wanted 

CATTS GYMNASTICS In 
Wamego is needing rocrea 

ttonal and loam coaches 
Starting pay $8 00 plus/ tir 
depending on experience 
ill Angle 
4568488 II interest- 
ed 

CHRISTMAS BREAK spe- 
.1,1: Nol going home for the 
holidays? Earn some money 
& have fun from mid- De- 
cember to Jan 3rd at Ihe C 
(iuesi Ranch in Ihe 
When won 
ir.hi'ii i ii 'ml i we*k witt i 
'ii lo pur 
sue your lavonlo winter acti- 
vites in Grand Cou" 

artaM Phil Dwyor si 
!44 or Email 
• ■." idduryy.CQffi 




Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri 
fy ihe financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Reader* are ad- 
vised to approach any 
auch employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urge* our r ea ders to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson 
Topeka, KS 68607 1190 
(785)2320454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assure* every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field of 
work or labor tor which 
he/ she is properly quali- 
fied regardless of race. 
*ox military status, disa- 
bility, religion, agi 
national origin or antes 
try. Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources al City 
Hail, (785)567-2441 

'BARTENDING' $300 a any 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed. Call 1-800-965-6520 ext 
144 



<3o-fc old 



RID 



■ T! 



in -the 

Kansas STATE 

Collegian 

103 Kee4?:i« 
F332 «3SE>? ' 





All Apartments within 
Walking Distance to Campus 



ONE BEDROOM 

$370-490 

3 BEDROOM HOUSE 

$700-825 

•Available in January 



Drr 




537.7701 



3101 



Help Wanted 



ROVAL PURPLE YEAR- 
BOOK itsft is looking lor a 
marketing assistant to help 
design promotional material 
assist with yearbook sales 
and participate in m 
activities Work on salary (o 
help promote K- State 1 ') 
•ward-winning yi-. 
Ten hours/ week Stint im 
mediately Call Lindsay Por 
tor al (785)532-6'; 
more Information 



STUDENT NEEOINC, nda 
home occasionally to Par- 
son KS on weekei' 



ECONOMIC DEVELOP 
MENT Ciiurdinator Full 
timo position available In 
Wabaunsee County Salaty 
based upon expnrietice Fur 
complete position descnp- 
iron ptease contact WCED 
at (765)7654655 Applied- 

Nov t mb . n send 

BOvar Mm amd raaurna ■ 

WCED PO Box 5. Alma, KS 
66401 or email to 
MiBfldcsTk i-inaa s not 

GET PAID to drive a brnnd 
new car' Now pnyi' | 
nrs $800- $3200 a month 
Pick up your tree car key to- 
day 
www.tr cecark.ey.cgfn 

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
ng a management 
company that has tM^n do- 
ing business with Geary 
Communiiy Hospital is an 
irify have a 
position I Senior 

Health Center and Bramlage 
inpatieni ,m r*j 

r-istanl Director The quail 
fiod applicani mti> I 

n ol a bnchalor's de 
Business and or 
Marketing with a healthcare 
.. ''interred 
bui iiot recjuirdL) P 
am Monday OnxwgTi Fi<jay 
wilh a'i' 

other weekend Interested 
lualifed applicant 
should apply in writing to 
Geary Community Hospital 
An Mrjlanie Gnlfin 
Haallh Cental 1 I 
Marys Rd Junction City, KS 
66441 or lax to (765)238 
2681 or email to 
iTayrttrftgctltojro, Equal 
, Employer 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAT 

GROUND Supervisors- 
Hall Monitors needed lor 
the 2005- 20CH6 school year 
$8 50 p#l hour 

1 m - lOOfjm Appiy 

2031 Poynu 

S 66502 

|ual Op 
| ujyer 

0VTBOL/NO SAtES Civ 

ir. euSt 
signed 'oca' government 
wabsrtes Currently we are 
>' and full time 
. 

.lad sell- siadi.tr with 
strong communrcatu 
Base wage plus bonuses 
i-'luals about $18/ hour or 
Email resume to 
JOtlSttCJVicplua com m Mi 

Tiportimitv Empkiy- 
et 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC 
Jliurls diadnlg 

local govemmt>r'i iv 

" ASP arid SQL e> 
a requited $t4 50/ 
hour Email resume m Mi- 
crosoft Word or text formal 
i i-'luicura. 



ButtniH 
Opportunities 



The Collegian cannol veri 
fy the financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em 
ploymenf/Career claiaifi 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business oppurtum 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urge* 
our reader* to contact the 
Better Business Bureau 
501 SE Jefferson, Topeka. 
KS 66607 1190. (785)232 
0454 




4101 



Kama tei ?■•!!' 



women of m attrt 

isauall 
victim 




Deadline* 

C'.c ..,' ii ■ * 
aoSrnu9t)e^l.y:,i 

■■':tf(i 
ptWllJiht J.ttn ynii want 

CAii 532-6555 



ClasstlieaRATES 

1DAY 

' 20 



2 0AV5 

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,er20 



5 DAYS 

20 wo/ds or less 

20 

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holidays. 



HOW TO PAY 

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meals 














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every column, and ever) 3 \ 3 bn\ 

contains the digits I through 9 

wilh no repeals 



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6 

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2 9 5 


7 
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1 2 

7 


3 

5 


7 


6 


9 


9 1 4 

2 ] ~ 


6 








3 7 
4 


8 


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at w 


utk 

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ma 


ndi 
oku 


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.i pnees guar*itHnr 

6r«ok I 1 pnopto ii' 

trip tree 1 Brouo 

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FREE FOdNO ADS 
CORRECTIONS 



; 



CANCELLATIONS 



. 






HEADLINES 

■ 

. I 










— 



Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 21, 2005 



SNYDER I K-State coach honored with video tributes, chants from fans 




Christopher Hsnewinckcl | 
K-State coach Bill Snyder becomes overwhelmed with emotion as 
seniors made their way onto the field prior to K State's game against 
Missouri, Seniors, some of whom were members of the Big 1 2 Champi- 
onship team in 2003, played their final game as Wildcats Saturday, 



t 'mil mu i'd from Page l 

[till Snyder Family Stadium, 
un senior day 

"It was kind of surreal at 
first." he raid It was jusl an 
amazing feeling, and than it 
hit me Bite, 'We did thi- U. 
[ rwtjl) got thf win, and It was 
the perfect time " 

It WM a day filled with 
emotional goodbyes to Snyder, 
who ended his career with 136 
victories, and nearly everyone 
was Caught lip in it, 



During pre-gamc warm- 
ups, several players stood ami 
watched the [umboTron Bl I 
highhjzhi video from Snydei t 

tenure played 

Before the learn ran mi in 
the field, a tribute video to 
Snyder played, which Spurred 
on tears and cheers from play- 
ers and the crowd, and ended 
with a simple message Thanks, 
Coach 

Al halftone, vel an 
video played honoring Snyder 
with messages from everyone 



boa former players Terence 
Newman and Darren Sproles, 
to Sin Pit Robert!, to cur- 
rent Oklahoma coaches Bob 

Sloops, Kansas City Chiefs' 
Dick Vermeil and Iowa Stale's 
Dan McCarncy, among many 
ol hers 

Snyder said in Ihe lime 
Iron i his Tuesday press confer 
BQCC lo announce his retire- 
ment to Saturday's game, he 
had become emotionally over 

whelmed 

i mi ipenl i in ipeai he 
said "It's been a far different 
Wttk than I anticipated si on 
last Tuesday. Us been a hard 
week, ll'j been B vet) emu 
tional time and I've probably 
experienced every emotion 
that an individual can experi- 
ence/' 

As for ihe game itself, the 
Wildcats rallied from a 28 14 
deficit behind the legs and arm 
of former starling quarterback 
Allen Webb, 

Webb came off (he bench m 
Ihe third quarter to spark the 
Wildcat comeback hy DOBB 
pleling 10-of-l4 passes for 0> 
yards and I touchdown in id 
d it ion to 91 yards rushing. 

Webb said ilu game was 
special to the players, who 
uanied to win their last game 
under Snyder 

"We wanted him to leave 
on top," Webb said "He's been 
a wonderful coach J think his 



past speaks [or itself You re- 
ally can't be coached by am 
coach better than him " 

('oil owing K- Slate's win, the 
13th consecutive victory over 
Missouri, Snyder addressed 
the crowd from a platform sci 
up near the 10-yard line at the 
north end of the field 

"This was a very hard deci- 
sion to make." Snyder said 

I like to think 1 made it for 
the righl reasons, but as I look 
nul here today, I realize how 
really difficult this is going to 
be" 

I hev're going In name llns 
stadium the Bill Snyder Family 
Stadium, and I hope that you 
understand that you are my 
family as well " 

After he spoke, Snyder 
was earned off the field on 
the shoulders of senior offen 
sive lineman Jcromey Clary 
and sophomore wide receiver 
Jordy Nelson, a filling end to 
Snyder's 17 year run as one 
of the most successful college 
football coaches in the game's 
history. 

"We just feel really greal to 
have him leave on top," Webb 
said 



GENERAL | Military science 
room named after K-State graduate 




Continued from Page I 

have fun with their job and to en- 
joy the benefits of military life 

Keys, a K-State graduate, is 
one of only 14 four-Star generals 
in the U.S. Air Force, said Capt 
Shane Kinkaid Another four-star 
general, Gen Richard B Myers 
is also a K-State graduate. Myers 
received similar honors from the 
university in 1999. 

"It's a pretty big accomplish- 
ment for one university," Kinkaid 
said 

has been in the Air Force 



Erik Rogers, junior 
in sociology, lis- 
tens to Ron Keys, 
Air Force Gen- 
eral, talk about 
his military career 
Saturday in the 
Military Science 
Building. 

Katie Lester 

(01 1 EX IAN 



for 38 years 

He has 300 hours of combat 
time in southeastern Asia and has 
served as an assistant lo both the 
Air Force Chief of Staff and the 
Secretary of Defense 

Currently General Keys is the 
Commander of Air Combat Com 
mand which oversees the bulk of 
U.S. Air Force operations 

He is also tfie Air Component 
Commander (or U.8 |oinl Forces 
Command and US. Northern 
Command 

"1 would never have thought 
Td make it I his far," Key* Mid 



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Thank You Coach Snyder for the Memories 









i /^K A N S A S STATE 

• Collegian 



INS|i« 



Sub. Exp Dale 



\ViM Kansas S,J,P Historical Society 

f " u Newspaper Section 

Spot PO Box 3585 

toun Top * ka KS 66fi 01 



Sports, Page 6 




wwwksUlccollegianconi 



Monday, November 28, 2005 



Vol M0.Ni 



Tornado warnings add to confusion at shopping center 



By Lola ShrimpJIrt 

KANSAS STMKOIlEGlAN 

Confusion reigned at Manhat- 
tan Town Center Sunday when a 
tornado warning left employees 
and shoppers unsure of what to 
do to protect themselves. 

Amie Frye, receptionist at the 
oiner service desk, said then 
is a handbook fur employees oi 
the mall, describing what proce- 
dures to follow in an emergency, 
but even the employees didn't 



know what to do 

Allen Raynor, mall manager, 
wasn't working during the tor 
nado siren 

"(People) can't leave the mat I 
unless the matt manager says they 
can," Frye said "And the mail 
manager wasn't here" 

Some patrons believed they 
had to stay at the mall during live 
tornado warning. Frye said. 

Raynor said despite the confu- 
sion, everything went .is planned. 

"We had a plan We foD 



it." Raynor said 

Ntkki Smith, cosmetologist 
at Regis Hair Stylists in Manhul 
tan Town Center, said since they 
aren't allowed to stay in the sa- 
lon, she u>ok her client with her 
to a hallway. 

Both Smith and Frye said the 
store gates at the mall are low- 
ered during a tornado warning. 
Patrons and employees are able 
to slay in the back of the stores 

"All the gates go down. Then 
they're in there Then they have 



to stay m there." Frye said 

Patrons of the mall were re 
quired to remain in the mall, 
Smith said 

"They lock all the doors," she 
said "If they try to leave the mall, 
security will stop them" 

But security guard James 
Younkin said for security reasons, 
the doors couldn't be lucked Res 
cue workers need to be able to 
enter the mall in an emergency. 

People who are seeking refuge 
need to be able to access the mall. 



and those who wish to leave need 
to be able to leave. Younkin said. 
uie cius'l force anybody 
out of a safe haven," Younkin 
said 

Normal procedure* in a tor- 
nado warning include annouru 
ing the warning over the public 
address system However, no 
announcement was made during 
the warning Oil Sunday 

"I don't think the PA system 
wasworfr uid. 

The ■ • i iings were 



only a segment of weather condi- 
tions around Kansas nn Sunday 

Interstate 70 was dosed from 
I 's Highwav 24 in Colby to 
Good land and the Colorado bor 
der. because ol icepaeked and 
snowy conditions 

ound I 70 \\.is wet from 
Topeka to Kansas ok 

We i an have tomadoaa any 
time of the year," Mary Knapp, 
rtate ctimalologjst, said "We've 

i had tluindersnow a couple 
ol tunes" 



Beauty queen 

K-State student represents 

Blue Valley in competition 

for title of Miss Kansas 2006 




Along with several other contestants, Alexandra Ross comes back 
on stage In her swimsuit. The Miss Kansas and the Miss Teen Kan 
m pageants were held at the same time 



By Kalay Lyon 

KANSAS SlATf (OIUMAH 

Alexandra Rota, freshman in pre- 
joumaltsm and mass communications, 
traveled to Overland Park. Kan , over 
the long m 1 not for a holi- 

day feast 

l vraa out of 51 females aged 18 
27 whu wai choten to It In the 

2006 USA pageant 

who represented Blue Valley in the 
was informed of her aeceplan e 
in eaiiv i kiober. 

aid ' l rn 
i and clos- 
er and I get really nervous It will be 
fun, 1 think" 

She made the decision to enter (he 
pageant last summer In |uly she com- 
pleted the required personal question 
naire and submitted her beadshols 
Her encouragement to apply for the 
hi came from her mother's friend, 
i as been on pageant judging com- 
mittees, she said. 

"He told me I really should do it" 
Ross said "Mom got rne an application 
and I filled it out" 

As this is the first pageant Ross baa 
participated in, she turned to her resi- 
dence hall neighbor, lessica Villa, who 
has been in about 10 pageants, for 
guidami 

"I think a lot of people judge pag- 
eants without ever giving them a shot," 
Villa, freshman in theater, said "When 
you go through the preparation and 
pageant weekend, it gets crazy, and 
a lot of people don't understand how 
hard of work it is and all the prepara- 
tion that goes into it. It's a really good 
experit'ii. 

The pageant took place from Nov. 
25-27 at Johnson County Community 
College of Overland Park A 900-dol'- 
lar entry fee was required, for which 
funding the contestants solicited vari 
ous sponsors. This fee covered lodging 
and dining expenses for the three day 
event 

On Friday, the first day of the pag- 
eant, the contestants enjoyed a little 
rest and relaxation The evening, which 
Consisted of a banquet dinner, allowed 
the contestants to become acquainted 
with each other, the pageant staff, city 
officials and other special guests 

( rn Saturday, the contestants began 
work with numerous choreography re- 
hearsals. They were required to learn 
choreography for the opening song, 
which was presented at (he final pag- 
eant Sunday evening 

The presentation show was also Sat- 
urday, during which time the girls were 
presented to the judges and competed 
in the swimwear and evening gown 
categories. A live audience was also 
present for this portion of the pageant 

See PA0EANT Page 8 




Photos fay St«v*n Doll | (OdlGIAN 
Miss Kansas USA pageant contestant Alexandra Ross, freshman In pre -journal Ism and mass communications and 
the current Miss Blue Valley, makes her way onto the stage along with the other contestants one last time for the 
presentation part of the pageant Saturday night at Johnson County Community College. The pageant was a three- 
day event that ended with the crowning of a new Miss Kansas. 




CNN creator 
to lecture 
in McCain 

Auditorium 



By Adrianne OeWecse 
KANSK STATE I ullGlAN 

apadty crowd is nut expect- 
ed at Ted Turner's Landun Lecture 
Reagan, chair 
of the Landon Lecture series. 

"Wen- hopinf lor a good 

crowd, but we do not think it will 

ittng.' Reagan 

< )n [urn I, ]48(j. Turner ittitl 

ated Network, the 

work' tour news 

television net- 
work. 

He aJfO be 
gan Headline 
News, CNN In 
ind 
Turner 

United Na- 
(ii ns Pounda 
tion with a com 
nutrient ol $1 

button to ( 

mot eful 

world through 
the support of 
the United 
tions Turner 
also owns about 
2 million acie- 
of land in seven 
slates, includ- 
ing Kane i . and 
i. uses bison on 

ilu land 

"He's some- 
one who has 
been at the van 
top in three dif 
ferent areas,' 
Retail said 

also 
virtually the inventor of cable tele 
vision" 

In addition to giving a Landun 
Lecture, Turner will also visit the 
i Ptmirie Research Natural 
Area, Reagan said 

'We thought he would be inter- 
ested in seeing the research being 
done at Konza Prairie and how 
we raise our bison." Reagan said 

Turner introduced 24 hour 
news coverage, which did not ex- 
ist before CNN, said Barb Smith, 
instructor ol journalism and mass 
communications 

"Turner can give a broader per- 
spective on how he views journal- 
ism and where he see\ it heading," 
laid Smith, who worked for com- 
mercial radio stations in Michi 
gan. 

Chris Olsen, senior in mass 
communications said Turner 
is one of the most influential 
people in television because he 
look it (mm a local to a national 
level, 

"He knows what globaliza- 
tion and media convergence are," 
Olsen said. "He has a view of 
the way the future of media 
looks" 



Turner 

141st 

Landon 

Lecture 

When: 

10 30 am today 

Where: 

Md<)in Auditorium 

How much: Free 

inside, 
Page 3 

Bringing people to 
speak ai Landon 
Lett wen is not 
easy It takes time 
and a little luck 



Today 



« 



*5P 



High 17 
Low 24 



Tuesday 

High 40 
Low 20 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Credit Card awareness 

Bob Nugent, the chief U.S. bankruptcy 
judge for Kansas, is trying to educate 
people about the dangen of credit 
cards by starting a local version of 
Credit Abuse Resistance I due at ion, 
which puts credit card abuse on a par 
with abusing alcohol and drugs. 

Story, Page J 



Greyhound crash 

faro Jahani, SO, and Martha Contreras, 
21, were killed when a greyhound bus 
tan oft a freeway, overturned and slid 
about 100 yards before hitting a tree 
Sunday Authorities said driver fatigue 
may have contributed to the crash 
Owens of the 44 people aboard the 
San Franctsco-bound bus were hurt. 



Iraq abuse 

Ayad Allawi, Iraq's former interim 
prime minister, told the London 
newspaper. The Observer, Sunday that 
human rights abuses by some in the 
new government are as bad now as 
they were under Saddam Hussein. He 
said Shiites are responsible for death 
squads and secret torture centers. 



DON'T FORGET 



Tea Turner will speak 
at 10:30 this morning 
in McCain Auditorium as 
part of the Landon Lecture 
Series. 

Today Is the last day for 
graduate students to con 

firm online December com- 



mencement attendance. 

The Metalsmithing 
Society's Holiday Sale 

Is from 8 am. totSpm. 
today in the K State Student 

Union 



R 



/ 






Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



CJiafUn. SopAa and £<y>lti 



1814 C/aflin Rd 
www ciatiinboQks.com 



h 



(785) 776-3771 
Fax: (785) 776-1009 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



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M IK K S > I \ I I- N \ \ I K 

Yesterday** Otpioiiuip: II SOMEBODY 
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WEEK IN REVIEW 

7 things you didn't know 7 days ago 

Father, daughter fa!! through ice 




Mark Wal | ASS0CIA1 Ct> PRESS 
Diver j search an icy pond near Cedar Grove, Wis., Friday, where a 44- year- old 
man and his 9-year-old daughter fell through the ice while ice skating. They 
both died in the accident. 



A father and daughter died in Cedar Grove, 
Wis , Friday altera tragic ice-skating trip Me 
gan Obhink, 9, and her 6-year-old sister wen 
ice-skating Friday morning when Megan fell 
through the Ice. Her father, Brian, 44, tried 
to save her, but he also fell in, The sister ran 
and called 91 1 but it was too late Both bodies 
were recovered later that day 

NIKE JET LANDS SAFELY 

A Nike corporate jet carrying president and 
CEO William D. Perez and six other people 
developed landing gear problems on Monday 
shortly after takeoff, but made a safe emergen 
cy landing The Gulfstream jet touched down 
at 12:11 p.m in Hillsbnru, Oregon, the same 
place the phine left Perez, 5H, was thankful to 
the pilots for getting the plane down s;ifi Iv 

MANHATTAN STUDENT ARRESTED 

A 15-ycar-old Manhattan High School stu- 
dent was arrested Tuesday after a homemade 
chemical bomb he brought to school ex 
ploded. The student reportedly showed the 
bomb to friends on the district's west campus 
around noon, Principal Terry McCarty said 
Police said the student was released to a par- 
ent The student faces a charge of criminal 
use of an explosive. McCarty said the student 
could face disciplinary action ranging from a 
one-week suspension to a one-year expulsion 
No one was injured, and damage to the school 
was minor, police said in a press release. 

CITY CLOSES WATER SUPPLY 

The city of Harbin, China, closed schools on 
Wednesday and was trucking drinking water 
into the city after the water supply had to be 
shut down at midnight Tuesday The shutdown 
was a result of a chemical explosion on Nov 
13 in nearby lilin that officials said polluted 
a nearby river with the toxic chemical ben- 
zene However, an employee for the Harbin 
Environmental Bureau said there is no sign 



the chemical actually got into the water 

ACTOR DIES AT 73 

Actor Pal Moritu, famous for roles in "Happy 
Days" and "The Karate Kid", died Thur> 
with conflicting reports ol tin t BUM of death 
His daughter, AJy. said he died of heart fail- 
ure, but his manager said he died of kidiuv 
k failure He was 73 years old His wife, Evelyn, 
said her husband "dedicated his entire life to 
acting and comedy" 1 lis role as Mr Miyagi in 
"The Karate Kid" was a career defining rule 
as he taught "Daniel -San" to "wat on, wax 
o!T He is survived by his wife of 12 years and 
three daughters from a previous marriage. 

GAY ARAB MEN FACE CHARGES 

More than two dozen gay Arah men eould 
face government-ordered hormone treat- 
ments, five years in jail and a lashing, au- 
thorities said Saturday The Interior Mini 
said police raided B hotel chalet earlier this 
month and arrested 22 men from the Emir 
ates as they celebrated a wedding cere mon y 
This is one of ■ string of recent group arrests 
of homosexuals Interior ministry Brakesman 
Issain Azouri said the men are likely to be 
iried under Muslim law under charges related 
to adultery and prostitution Outward homo- 
sexual behavior is banned in the United Arab 
Emirates. 

JAPANESE RESIDENTS EVACUATE 

About 3,900 residents were evacuated in To- 
kyo <*n Sunday while authorities dug up an 
unexpluded 500 -pound bomb. The bomb is 
believed lo have been dropped by the United 
States during World War II Tokyo's Katsushi- 
ka ward spokesman Takanori Kato said the 
bomb was about 14 inches in diameter and 
47 inches long. A diver found 59 uncxploded 
shells in waters near Tokyo on Friday 

Source: Attodattd Press 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Report* are taken directly from Riley County Polite Department's daily 
logi The Collegian does not list wheel locks ot minor traffic vwlalkms 
because of space constraints 

Tuesday, Nov. 22 

■ Javil Hansen, 917 Laramie St., Apt. 1 , was arrested at 1 2:35 am for 
reckless driving. Bond was set at $1,500 

■ James Woodyard, 730 Allen Road, was arrested at 1 1 a.m. for two 
counts of lewd and lasdvious behavior and sexual battery. Bond was 
set at $1,000 

■ Tianeslw Robinson, Wichita, was arrested at 3:42 pm for failure to 
appear. Bond was set at $3,000. 

■ Kevin Outhet, 81 2 El Paso lane, was arrested at 4: 1 7 p.m for prate 
Hon violation. Bond was set at $500 

■ Gregory Young, Arkansas City, Kan., was arrested at 10:40 p.m. foi 
worthless check. Bond was set at $400 

■ Steven Phillips, 728 Rannells Road, was arretted at 1 1:05 p m for 
battery. Bond was set at $500. 

Wednesday, Nov. 23 

■ Joseph fabre, 81 2 E) Paso Lane, was arrested at 1 : 10 a,m. for four 
counts of theft. Bond was set at $2,500. 

■ Jessica faster. Junction Crty, was arrested at 1 45 a.m for attempt- 
ing to flee Bond was set at $ 750 

■ Unel Ramierer-Medtna, 1 536 Campus Road, was arrested at 2:51 
a mJor Dill Bond was set at $750 

— for a complete ntord or wrests, it* wwwiwortwJfejtoi.nwn. 

The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar Is the Collegian's campus bulletin board service 
Items In the calendar can be published up to three times, items 
might not appeal because of space constraints but are guaranteed 
to appear on the day of the activity To place an item in the Campus 
Calendar, stop by Ke&re 1 1 6 and fill out a fotm ot e-mail the news 
editor at ra%«n@spurJ.*su,«fa by 1 1 a m two days before it is 
lo tun. 

■ Atopic research daiti will be from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m today at 
Hale 408. 

■ Students can receive HIV Information and free HIV testing 

from 10:30a m. lo 1:30 p.m. today and Tuesday in the K State 
Student Union Students should stop by the SHAPE table near the 
Union food court 

■ Tenor Seth Jones will give a free recital at 7 30 tonight in All 
Faiths Quad 

■ The Rotaract Club will have a resume critique at 8 tonight in 
Union 213 

■The People Speak Forum will beat 5:30 tonight in the Inter 
national Student Center 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear In this spate If you see some 
ihing that should be corrected, call news editui Kristen Roderick at 
5 324556 w e-mail e plleqtanmpub hu edu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper 
at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during 
the summer. Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502. 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, KedJie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 7167 
-Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



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Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Arranging Landon Lectures often 
takes time, flexibility, patience 



By Logan C. Adams 

KANSAS MAIM 01 If MAN 

li lakes plenty of work and 
a bit of luck to make a Landon 
LectUM happen, but the results 
aren't always perfect 

This became clear a month 
ago when Mikhail Gorbachev's 
Landon Lecture drew a far 
larger crowd than organizers ex- 
pected and thousands of people 
were turned away at the doors 
of McCain Auditorium 

The lecture ended a long se- 
ries of events and efforts to bring 
Gorbachev to Kansas 

Charles Reagan, chairman of 
the Landon Lecture Series, said 
it started when a professor at 
Bethany College in Lindsborg, 
Kan , tried to arrange for the 
former Russian leader to come 
for a spec i al chess event in the 
city The professor discovered 
the price was much higher than 
he could afford, but Gorbach- 
ev's agent told him to find a 
few other American venues for 
Gorbachev to appear at and the 
price would be lowered 

This. Reagan said, is where 
K State and other locations 
across the country came in 

"He's going to come over for 
10 or 12 days, and they want to 
cram in a bunch of events, and 
he picks up a wad of money, and 
he flies home.' Reagan said "lis 
kind of like a rock tour' 

Even with the other venues, 
Gorbachev's price was too much 
for the Landon Lecture Sc; 
Reagan said To make it pos- 
sible, he said one local business- 
man arranged a $l,000-a-couple 
dinner that Gorbachev attended, 
which paid for two-thirds of the 
cost 

All expenses of the lecture 
are paid fur by the series' pa- 
irons , who pay $300 a year for 
reserved lotting, tickets to each 
lecture's luncheon and other 
amenities Reagan said the pa- 
trons number about 225, up 
from the about 175 patrons the 
series had two years ago before 
a campaign boosted patronage 

Reagan said the fee depends 
on the speaker He -^aid led 
Turner, who will lecture today, 
is speaking for free and is li 
himself here Brian Williams, an 

NBC news anchor arbo spoke in 
ipring20O5, had tiu-M-t 

a contribution to a fund fi 
Irierut's crippled daughter 
Reagan said lawmakers like 



Possible Bramiage 
Coliseum arrangements 

■ 3,000-5,500 people: Stage is where 
basketball court stands, facing west with 
curtain behind It. Audience sits In iOOO 
chdirtuik seats and folding chairs on 
Bramlage's floor Numbei vanes because 
placement of stage determines number of 
chairs that can be placed on the floor 

■ 7,500 people: Stage is at half-court, fac- 
ing north with curtain behind It. Audience 
sits in stands and in chairs on the floor 
Meal for speaker and patrons Is on south 
side of curtain 

■ 9,500 people: Stage is at south end of 
floor, facing north with curtain behind it 
Audience sits in stands and in chairs placed 
on the floor 

Source: Charlie Thomas, director of Bram- 
iage Col lieum 

Sens Pat Roberts, R-Kan , and 
Tom Daschle, DSD , spoke for 
free but were transported here 
and back by ihe Landon Lecture 
Series However, Gale Norton, 
Secretary Of the Interior, had to 
pay for all her expenses because 
she works for the government's 
executive branch 

The costs weren't the end 
of it Reagan said dates were 
shifted time and lime again, and 
Gorbachev was supposed to be 
at K-State on Oct. 27 and at the 
University of Kansas Oct. 28. 

Then KU dropped out, Rea- 
gan said, because Gorbachev 
would he ai K-State first He 

i K-State was asked to move 
the lecture back one day, which 
it did, and Gorbachev scheduled 
two more events for the open 
day 

rhi plan was for the speaker 
and his entourage to arrive the 
morning of Oct 28 before the 
lecture, but changes continued 
to come right up to the end. Rea- 
gan said Gorbachev and those 
cling with him were com- 
ing to Manhattan in a chartered 
plane, bat wanted to be rid of it 
the evening of Oct 27 instead of 
the i o save on the cost 

of. the plane 

..hi said he agreed to pav 
for Gorbachev's party's lodging 
the night before and for the ride 
to Chicago from Kansas in the 
university's jet. 

id how many people 
does your jet hold'' .Hid 1 said 
■fi\e' and lhe\ said 'No, no, no, 
no Wc have eight people and 25 

To accommodate the number 



of people, Reagan said he had to 
use both the university's plane 
and rent the larger plane used 
by the state of Kansas He said 
he never knew what were in the 
suitcases, just that they were 
large and heavy. 

Reagan said there were three 
reasons he was surprised by the 
former Russian leader's popu- 
larity. 

First, Gorbachev spoke close 
to the time of the All-University 
Homecoming parade, late on a 
Friday afternoon, a time when 
campus is sparsely populated. 

"I've been here for 39 years," 
Reagan said "You look at a 
parking lot around here on a 
Friday afternoon, it's empty. A 
lot of students go home, they go 
off to drink beer, whatever" 

Second, he said he didn't 
think students really knew who 
Gorbachev was, and noted when 
he was in power, most K-State 
students were in kindergarten 

Finally, Reagan said there has 
been a poor turnout for Landon 
Lectures in the past three years, 
and no one said this lecture 
would be any different. 

"I didn't get any clues from 
the Collegian or from student 
government or anywhere else 
that there was going to be an 
overflow," he said 

Reagan said the lecture's 
location could not have been 
changed the week of the lecture 
because press releases, tickets 
and letters had been sent out 
He said changing it would have 
caused confusion for all who 
had already been told to come 
to McCain 

"You can imagine the people 
arriving at McCain to be told 
they've got to get back in their 
cars and drive out to Bramiage," 
Reagan said 

Also, he said it isn't so easy to 
change the venue because other 
places have schedules of their 
own. Reagan said he had been 
told by Bramiage Coliseums 
management there were three 
available setups for lectures 
there 5,500 people, 7,500 and 
9,500. 

Reagan said far fewer people 
would have turned out if the 
lecture had been at Bramiage 
because everyone would have 
had tu drive instead of going to 
the lecture Irnin a class. 

"We didn't think it would 
come close to 5,500, and noth- 
ing looks worse than having a 



half-empty auditorium," he said 
"It makes you look stupid" 

However, Charlie Thomas, 
director of Bramiage, s;tid i In- 
smallest option can be flexible 
He said the smallest set-up can 
be altered to allow Bramiage to 
hold between 3,000 and 5,500 
people, depending on where the 
stage is placed 

Setting up a lecture in Bram- 
iage is another problem Thomas 
said it takes one to two days to 
switch out the basketball court 
- which was in place the week 
of Gorbachev's lecture - put 
the stage together and set out 
chairs 

"You could do it in less if you 
got a heck of a lot more people 
(working) in there," he said 

Reagan said it also can cost 
up to $8,000 in labor and other 
costs to transform Bramiage 
Thomas confirmed this, and he 
said former Attorney General 
Janet Reno's lecture cost $7,200 
in work at Bramiage because 
it required additional rooms to 
be set up for things related the 
event, including a press confer- 
ence. 

President [on Wefald said it 
is often difficult to get distin- 
guished people to speak in the 
series because of the state's loca- 
tion and political arrangement 

"Republicans look at Kansas 
and say 'we've got it. Why do I 
need to go to Kansas?' Demo- 
crats look at it and say 'it's a Re- 
publican state We'll never get 
it," he said. "If we were Iowa, 
we'd have more speakers than 
we could shake a stick at." 

Reagan said the Landon Lec- 
ture Series has made other uni- 
versities want to know the tricks 
K-State uses to get its speakers 

"One of the greatest secrets 
of tlie Landon Lectures is how 
we get people here," he said 
"It's like my mother's secret chili 
recipe" 

Reagan said six students 
from Oklahoma attended |im 
Lehrer's lecture this spring, and 
Reagan has advised the Univcr 
sity of Nebraska on how to start 
its own series. However, he said, 
their attempt didn't do so well 
when they ignored his most im 
portant piece of advice. 

"You have to begin with 
a blockbuster, somebody that 
other people want to follow, and 
they didn't." he said "They went 
out and got some third-rate, re- 
tired politician" 



Dean of Graduate school 
makes appearance on ABC 




Trtwyn 

VICE PROVOST [OR: 

KhUKIM 0UIN0I 
KDUAK KH001 



_ By Chuck Armstrong 

_— KANSAS SWHOUECIAN 

A plaque near Washington, 

"DCs Vietnam Wall honor* vet 
cram who died 
during the Viet- 
nam War A 

"1982 Atr htrce 

-sjudy that last 

-ed 20 years and 

-cost $140 mil 

.Jlon attempted 
,tn find out why 
thosi veterans 
died 

Z TheAirForce 
Ranch Hand 
Sludy of 1.200 
Vietnam veter- 
ans monitored the health efl 
tlf Agent Orange, one of which is 
I aiieei, said Ronald Trewyn, vice 
fw i ivosl for research and dean of 
Hit Graduate School 

Irewyn did not .ielually do 

any of the research for the study, 

but he was on the advisory com 

suttee that reviewed the study. 

Trewyn, who works in cancer 

-research, reviewed the cancer 

-chapter of the study, and said he 

Idid not like what he read 

In an advisory committee 

meeting in (line, an independent 

^producer for ABC was intrigued 

Toy what Trewyn hud to say on the 



issue Trewyn said the producer 

asked him several questions and 

thought this was a subject Ameri- 

Siould know about 

■m pa rued by Dr Arnold 

of the University of 

Texas School of Public Health, 

Trewyn spoke to Ted Koppel 

on ABC's Nightline Oil Nov. 17 

about the study TYewyn said he 

and Schecter agreed that Agent 

( rnutae eausi I but the 

Ranch Hand study failed to show 

it 

The study shows that (Agent 
Orange] hat no cancer efi< 
rrewyn said "That's not cor- 

There are problems with the 
report, Trewyn said, but the re- 
;>n be corrected 

"(The study) is irrational, 
scientifically unsound and po- 
tentially unethical to what this 
report is doing for Vietnam vet 
1 1, ms and their families," Trewyn 
said 

To view Trewyn 's discussion 
on Nightline. visii 
www. f redwards. com/mnhtm 



*/Lef us put the final 
touches on your 
final projects 

tjtWZi/l J{ooii aaJ gym 



Judge wants more 
credit card education 



tHf ASSOCIATED PRESS 

WICHITA - A federal 
bankruptcy judge is trying to 
set up a local program to edu- 
cate people, particularly young 
people, about the dangers of 
credit cards 

Every day, Bob Nugent, the 
chief U.S. bankruptcy judge for 
Kansas, deals with cases in- 
volving people who c ant pay 
their credit card bills. 

I could pull five files at ran- 
dom and you would see people 
with two, three, four and five 
credit cards, each with balanc- 
es of $2,000, $3,000, $5,000 or 
56,000," Nugent said 

Nugent said he hopes to es- 
lublish a local version of Credit 
Abuse Resistance Education, 
which puts credit card abuse 



on a par with abusing alcohol 
and drugs The program start- 
ed with a bankruptcy judge in 
Buffalu, NY', and is in place in 
some other states Similar pro- 
grams are gaining momentum 
in Kansas City and Topeka 

Nugent has already spoken 
to groups of high school stu 
dents and given a presentation 
to potential business majors at 
Wichita State University 

"Too many people in our so- 
ciety are financially illiterate,' 
Nugent said "Kids get these 
credit cards, and they don't 
know what to do with it Well. 
they know what to do with it 
but they don't understand that 
if you only pay the minimum 
payment every month, the re- 
sult is crushing" 



17th annual holiday 

music festival 
showcases local talent 




Cau in* Rawioii | lOttlCIAAl 
Meghan Newman, junior in English, taps on a wooden board Satur 
day afternoon at the Manhattan Town Center, Newman and other 
K-State dance students performed for a crowd with acts from their 
upcoming performance, WinterDance 2005 



By Annette Lawless 
KANSAS STATE COll 

Toddlers, teens dim 
and ( roup* will In. 

showcasing their talents in the 
Holiday M 

during the next few we< 
Manhattan Town Center 

The 17th annual Holiday 
Music Fest 
featuring the I 
progr i per 

iers 
on. local sell 
churches and o i 
community will i share 

their spirit ami talents in 
instrumental and dance per 

ni.es on ■■ 
in th> I Sara 

Van Allen marketing n 

er at Man! - 

"All tin el ■ 

val are quite a sit* to see Its 

somethnn 

miss out 

From \ lo 

cal groups will have aii oppor- 
hinitj lo give tin community 
a taste ol their organizations 
and in (urn g tin |l 

< 'lit tor U[' 
Van All it i 

AH-" toa the mi 

modern, jazz, ballet and 

features from 
vVinterDance, Manh 

klelil Sik l!\ V\ ilsofl s.nd she 



to attend the I 
annual performance later this 

Watching the Wimu 
s on Sat 

urda) was truly beautiful," said 
Wilson Knowing thai 
ot thi 

students - those lalenh- 

dent choreographers shows 

flu Wamego l-i 
will perform 01 

ill pa 

are also scheduled "' perform, 
dates 
tot confirmed 

'Its a great Op 

their kids 

i-iit listen io 
of the holiday music se 

\,1H \ller; 

tan oomirmnitj I 

■ 
ment and local chui 

Is will give us all | 
inttj io witness lhal this 

I oi more del 

roups 
interested In bi t part 

ot the Holid,i\ Mush le 

\llcti s.nd (hey should 
Manhattan [own 
■ vice desk 
u S39 9207 



ROYAL PURPLE 

yearbook 

We've got the stories ■ you've got to read 

Get your Royal Purple yearbook 
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FLINT HILUS ROOM 

: 2ND FLOOR • K-STAtt STUDENT UNION 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 






pon 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion, 

Michael Ash ford 
Johanna Barnes 
Abby Brown back 
Matthew Gfrard 
Matt Gornay 
Jonas Hogg 
Curtis Johnson 
Annatto Lawless 
Anthony Men don 
A I ax Peak 
Catrlna Raws on 
Krlstan Roderick 
Dave Skratta 



TO THE POINT 

Emergency 

plans should be 

made public 

Tornadoes in November? Seems like 
something more apt to be in a cheaply 
made Lifetime movie. 

Bui that's exactly what happened 
in Manhattan and surrounding areas 
Sunday, when several 
twisters touched down 
just three days shy 
of December, The 
forecast for later that 
evening? Snow. 

Too bad the 
weather was not the 
most ridiculous thing 
to happen this gloomy 
afternoon. 

People doing 
holiday shopping 
at Manhattan Town 
Center said they were 
confined to the mall 
when the city was 

issued a tornado warning at about 3:30 
p.m. Patrons reported mall officials 
refusing to allow them to leave while 
sirens sounded. 

Amie Frye, customer service, said 
the mall manager has to tell patrons 
whether it's okay to leave the mall. The 
manager was not there, which led to 
confusion for patrons and employees 
alike. 

Employees at the mall should be 
given instructions on what to do 
in emergency situations prior to 
employment. There should also be 
an emergency preparedness plan for 
patrons posted throughout the mall. 

This simple planning would lead 
to less confusion for employees and 
patrons 

In the case of a real emergency, 
preparedness could save a few lives, 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They un be 
submitted by e-mail to letltKidipubksu.edu, oi in person to 
Kedzie 1 16 Please indude your full name, year in school and 
major tetters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 



S^W HSM STATE 

Collegian 



CLASH OF THE COLUMNISTS 



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Johftnnt lirr>»i 

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coercwti 


CMrin* FUwion 

PHOTO 101 tot 


MIchMl Athfwd 
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CAMPUS IBII0R 


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CONTACT US 





Kansas State Collegian 
K«lrt>103 
Manhattan, KS 66507 

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Best western 



Though long, 'Lonesome Dove 
gives viewers sense of purpose 



A 



Lonesome Dove is ibi hours 
long. Sitting down to 
revel in the exploits 
of Captains Au- 
gustus McRae and 
Woodrow F Call of 
the Texas Rangers tfl 
something that must 
be planned for, like 
Friday night at the 
races or a Saturday 
evening on the plaza 
Don't start it after 
7 p.m., after a big 
meal, before a big 
test or on a first date. 

Technically, it's not a movie 

Lonesome Dove was an 
award-winning miniseries filmed 
in 1989, with stars Robert Du 
vafl, Tommy Lee Jones, 
Diane Lane, An- 
gelica Huston and 
Danny Glover 
The story is a big- 
screen rendition 
of western author Larry 
McMutlry's first book in the 
Lonesome Dove series. 

The majestic tale of retired 
Texas Rangers who conquered 
everything the Wild West dared 
to send their way has more 
themes than Old Maids at the 
bottom of your popcorn bucket 

Between Duvall and Huston, 
true love is lost to Duvall's char- 
acter, McRae's, restlessness and 
devotion to his riding partner 

Jones' character, Woodruw 
Call, is the driven accom- 
plisher whose sole short- 
coming lack of emotion. 

For the MTV-age, 
McRae is quite Sti- 
fler-esque in his 
mannerisms. The 
only differences 
art- his boots and 
hats, and that 
his motivations 
come not only 
from what rests 
between his legs, 
but also that which 
is flanked by his ears 
and beneath his chest. 

Duvall sets the standard 
for the romantic cowboy Hol- 
lywood never found again. His 
character shines like the stars on 
a moonlit prairie night Without 
his timing and wit, Lonesome 
Dove would be two cowboys 
pushing cattle while their friends 
die around them Pretty boring. 

In all fairness, we should be 
companng Lonesome Dove to 
a compilation of three or four 
Other great westerns, but tin- 
outcome would remain the same 
No character is superhuman, 
unbelievable or perfect - result- 
ing in a perfectly believable yet 
astounding account of hard 
ship, devotion, undying love 
and Irish mule rnanship. 

Hope you don't blame 
me for being VtflM Picking 
a high point out of any epic is 
near impossible Should I discuss 
the torn hearts of Captains Call 
and McRae as their rope hangs 
Jake Spoon, a friend and fellow 
Ranger who fell in with 
a gang of horse thieves 
and murderers? 

Or would it be 
more fitting to relate 
Call's bedside good- 
bye to a stubborn 
McRae who would 
rather die than Iom- 
his pride? If you're 
a bawler, you'd best 
bring a hearty sup- 
ply of tissues for the 
numerous deaths and 
tragedies through 
nut the film, but I've 
never fell anything 
but a longing for an 
adventure of the same 
sort when my stiff tegs 
lift me off the couch. 

When it's over, even if 



VI >ll 



re emotionally unaffected, 
you'll have purpose It'll be 
tini< U) (have again. 



Lucas Maddy is a senior in agri- 
culture technology management 
Mem send your comments to 
opinion mpub.Hu. 
•SB 



Butch Cassidy, Sundance Kid rule 
wild west with hope, possibility 



"Use enough dynamite there. 

This has lo be one of 
the besl lines ever to 
in movies - which is why 
"Butch Cassidy and the 

Sundance Kid" rules 
the western movie 
:ire. 

After all. 
Paul Newman 



7W 



LOLA 

SHRIMPUN 




and Robert Rcdford are two of the 
best actors to grace the 
silver screen Put them 
together and you have 
an instant classic. 

Any movie that 
has the tagtine, "Most oi 
what follows is true" has 
the option to go down 
in the annals of history 
The movie opens 
with a sepia-toned "film 
within a film" of the 
Hole in the Wall Gang 
holding up a train. This 
scene has been said to have influ- 
enced "The Great Train Robbery," 
which was one of the earliest 
classic films 

Paul Newman, as Butch 
Cassidy, is not even intro- 
duced as such until later in 
the film. Neither is his partner, 
Sundance, played by Robert Red 
ford 

The chemistry between these 
two characters is outstanding, 
they play off each other, creating 
a model for actors in every other 
movie to aspire to 

White Cassidy and Sundance 
are the main draw, the supporting 
cast are unforgettable as well. The 
Hole in the Wall Gang is full of 
memorable characters 
That is the best feature of this 
f It is character driven, not 
action driven And every character 
in the movie is a memorable one 
One of my favorites is Wood- 
cock - the guard for EH Har- 
riman and the Union Pacific 
Railroad 

After robbing the train 
several times, Butch and 
Woodcock become 
friends of sorts. At 
one point, Butch and 
Sundance blow a 
hole in the side 
of the train and 
injure Wood- 
cock, The next 
train robbery, 
Butch hears the 
familiar voice of 
Woodcock and 
asks his friend if 
he is all right After 
robbing the train over 
and over, Harriman hires the 
Pinkerton Posse to track Butch 
and Sundance down This leads 
to the pair running for their lives 
Every time they think they're safe, 
the pnsse shows up At one point, 
the pair doubles up on a horse, to 
throw off and divide the posse, but 
only wind up with a single horse 
and the entire posse following 
them with lanterns 

The relentless chase leads the 
pan la lend with increasing des- 
peration, and eventually they flee 
to Bolivia This is one of Butch s 
ideas, and it ends up going wrong 
as most of his plans seem to 

I hey rob a payroll mule train 
unable lo stop their old wuv> and 
while eating at a restaurant, a 
boy sees the mark of the mine the 
payroll came from Wounded by 
gunfire, they flee to the protection 
of an empty stucco building and 
are immediately surrounded hy the 
Bolivian calvary, 

The end of the movie is tragic , 
yet the pair go out as they lived 
Frozen in time, ail we see is the 
two outlaws with guns drawn, go 
ing lo their inevitable end 

And this is what makes the 
movie great, The pair continue to 
fight for survival even when there 
is no possible way out. When all 
looks lost, and no hope remains, 
the two characters are still discuss 
ing where they are going to go 
next Giving up isn't an option. In 
their minds, anything is possible 
That's how life should be 



Lola Stinmplm h t wninf in pre journalism . 
Plwst lend your tommenti lo 
opinion* fpub.kw. tdu 



CAMPUS FOURUM 1 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



Tbt Campus Fourum » tn* Col Ionian's 
anonymous call-in system. Tnt Fourum Is 
oSttod to otinsinatt vulgar, racist, oSksnm 

art at Ifca la w lin of two CaMisjian —c 
an tn«yonoana4 by thatdttorial «j«. 

If year nam* was William Williams, and 

you went by oWWWlafro, theft still really 
Bill and William?. 

The fcash of s small squirrel was found 
dead off Petticoat Law Sunday morning. 
AWwuuh it is believed to be a homicide, no 

i 



suspects are in custody Two cats are being 
held for questioning.. 



I to Seal's face? Chuck 
Norm happened to Seals face. 

So... hungry,, , my arm looks so good right 
now. 

teach Snyder, thank you so much for a 
wonderful 1 7 yean. We will not be able to 
survive without you on this campus, God 
Mess you, your family, the coaches and the 
pujyerj. 



I get to congratulate the K-State football 
team for defeating two opponents on 
Saturday's game They defeated both Mis- 
souri and the referees It's amazing, Good 
lob boys. 

Did anyone else notice that the Missouri 
Tigers mascot has an hourglass figure? 



I have like hve pounds of change, and I 
don't even have a quarter In It, Is that OK? 

Iirtten the Squirrel Is nothing more 
than a rat with a till. Thais why I shot 



him dead. 

I was watching the movie House of Wax, 
and It was horrible. But, then it got to 
the scene where Parrs Hilton got killed, 
brutally, and I was satisfied. 

To the person who stole the laptop from 
1530 larvls -- If you return II I promise I 
won't hunt you down and hurt you. 



My roommate told me that a terrorist 
bombed the telecommunications center, 
and (hats why At keeps going down. 



fi«t well soon Marcus Watts, you had an 
amazing season, 

Suckers. 

I know what happened to Seal's five 
— he was mauled by a seal, that's how he 
got his name. Duh 

One* again the gospel choir gets no cov- 
erage in the Collegian, and even if they did 
do something It would have to be workers 
of wisdom on the very back page. Thanks 

agalnColi(H)lan,weloveyou, 



Hey, Lucas Maddy, take a chill pill alright? 
I sew a semi take out one of the little 
pillars on the 17th St. entrance to campus 
this morning. 

Nott passing, giggling and telling secrets 
passed with the 1980s. Please tell this to 
the four Kappa's in microbiology 



Mood mom rawum? Goto 



fwitiafult 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



Relieving stress 




Steven Doll | (OUEGIAN 
, While exercising at the Peters Recreation Complex, Jamison Suahm, senior in mechanical engineering, bench presses Sunday evening. Exercising, listening to music .ind looking at 
art are ways students can reduce Stress. 

Music, exercise offer students alternatives for relaxation as semester closes 




Photo Illustration by Stew«n Ooll I C(" 



Eight ways to beat stress 

■ 1 Spend time In silence every day In the 
highiedi world, people are sutmunded by 
and immersed In Information — streaming 
via television, email, voice mall, fax 

mes and pagers Information overload 
tan become a detriment to your health. 

■ 2 Reconnecting with '.mines', is an 
important component of health Every day, 
pHjpli 1 should devole a little time to take 
themselves out of th» i busyness" game 
Fust, eliminate all the forms nt intrusion 
Then dose your eyes, brealhe deeply and let 
your thoughts float 

■ ! Don't buy into 0M I yftujjj definition 
of "news" Andrew Weil. M D„ recommends 



taking a voluntai 

regular basis— stop reading the newspaper 

and watching telei sionl 

or longer. 

■ 4 Pursue a passion Activities that absorb 
a person complex ..awes 
and put one into thai ton 

internal chatter h si ilk-d P , 
opens the (best, lifts one s moot! 
cravings and lowers blood pir, • 

■ S Practice the "Relaxation 

Herbert Benson, Ml), Harvatd researcher 
and author of The (fetation Response and 
timeless Mealing, says "Faith quiet 
mind like no other farm of (Hief. Hot 
technique: Repeal a sinrsp 
suchas"orie*lorveveHl!"i 



," ■ breatlii' in through the nose and 
; a word or 

■ n ISHf M other 
type of bodywon n a regular 

wer your heart rate and 

J promote muvle relax- 
•jl release 

■ 7 Let the tears flow (tying can be very 

i and 

■ ■ i ittgli Red 

-nedy 
Channel Rem a tape of your favorite 

Source Discovery Health 



By Amy Bolton 

KANSAS SMI! 

While some students deal 
wit It stress by going to 
bars, some have i 
relieve, (tit 

hvomore in 
".ral agriculture, said tl 
several w to 

deal with her stress 
"Exercise !■> alwtj 

IS walks bv vour 

She said other good w i 
deal with Stress .ire lak 
showers, going somew: 
she can be alon 
her thoughts, am 
mti v 

Wa ) 
lessor of mu \ * ol 

jazz, said listanini 

Jv il WJtfa 
"It Bl 

that causes pi 

the I 'nt tlit- mind and 

in the- tpi iid. 

He wtid music Km 

ity to change a pa 

k( them relax and I 
them to another pli 

"Ml: 

Guins said "Il crt 
- -i i ingi oj mods. 
It stimulates 

. quite unlike ant, other 
stimulus 

"When people a 
i theii iiu Kul t hi'\ Itsi 
I : 
to rtlav themselves, to reli 

I to relies 
when nol 

He ^^iiti music cms ■ 



lilies and 
have the 

of i 

<iid 

- .id 
Exe 1 

"If lake 

It relit | 

dps 
impi "ng 

ins," she 

dot 

■ ei Long! mi 

I 

her 
mind 

feel 

tin 
■ . 



'Walk the Line 1 brings Cash to life 
for music lovers, movie-goers 



"Walk the Line'' 

*•*•* 

Mom* r*vi«w by Ch rutin* Hansen 

The man, the myth and the 
legend that is [ohnny Cash 

been brought to life in the 
compelling new Dim 'Walk the 

Director James Mangold 
has crafted an extraordinary 

him thai is glowingly fond, at i 
brutally honest in its portrayal 
of Cash It is the unapologetk 
portrait of a BMfl M he travels 
through life's soaring highs 
and devastating lows. 

The film begins with Cosh 
as a young boy growing up Oil 
a cotton form where his family 
is scraping to get by 

Cash escapes from life's 
harsh reality by learning and 
singing every song in his moth- 
hymnal. 

Then a terrible accident 
claims the life of his beloved 
older brother His father's 
anger and a nagging sense of 
responsibility leave Cash with 
an enduring sense of pain and 
guilt he cannot shake even de- 
cades down the road 

The filmmakers also touch 



On his time in ihe I 
Force and first mat 
il*. hulk of the film foi uses on 
Cash's rise to stardom I 
i ring relationship u I 
• 'i Eds I iii- |mv Carter 

The two meet while on tour, 
and the late nig! ,md 

long weeks away from h 

forge i bond I 
Cash ana rhey devi 

a close ye I conflicted friend- 
ship: Cash harbors deeper 
ings for Carter, feelings that 
she can never quite admit to 
reciprocating 

He is there fur her through 
the pain and criticism 
public divorce, and she he!] 
to pull him out of a down- 
ward spiral into drugs and sell 
destruction. As the two are 
drawn closer, they try to deny 
the inevitable (act thai tin 
meant to be together 

Music lovers will be delight- 
ed with the quality and quanti- 
ty of the music throughout the 
film. The audience is treated 
to a behind the scenes look at 
how Cash discovers his trade- 
mark sound and tags along on 
his first tour with fellow Lip 
and-coming talents Jerry Lee 
Lewis and Elvis Presley 

i 



ire pcrforn 
hng "King of Fire." and 
the Hint's titular track When 
(trains ol 

Prison Blues" in an 

aire . jar thousands ol 

miles from home, it will send 

chill: doss i< In 

thai will persist until 'he cred 

iis begin l 

> t and 
Reese Witherspoon deliver ca- 
reer defining performances ill 
the roles ol Minny Cash and 
June Carlcr 

Phoenix whose intensit) 
and mi anted style has been 
underused In his past films 
"Gladiator" and "The Village," 
captures the essence of Johnny 

i without resorting to 

catur* lie takes the black 
suit, cloud of smoke and world 

■.(in hidden beneath a cool 
n d makes them all 
believable 

And Witherspoon's spunky 
performance as Carter is 
the film's secret weapon, 
She gracefully portrays her 
character's delicate balance of 
vulnerability and strength and 
lights up every scene in which 
she appears. 




"Walk the Line" is easily 
one of the best films to come 
out this year and is already 
generating awards show buz* 
Don't miss this poignant ex- 



ploration of one of the music 
world's most fascinating fig- 
ures, and the woman who 
helped him realize his poten- 
tial for greatness. 



FAMOUS 
QUOTES 



v,i got: to work with what you gots to 
work with 

— Stevie Wonder 

Tmane»iellcnt totKcfceepM tvety 
time I get 1 divorce. I ketp the house 

— Zsa Zsa Cabo r 

"for those who understand no explana- 
tion is needed lor thow who don't 
none will do' 

— Jerry Lewis 




"Aneyefotaneye Tiroberlake 
makes the whole 
world blind ' 

— Gandhi 

'Try not to become a man of success, but 
rather, try to become a man of value" 

— Albert Einstein 

"Clothes make the man Waked people 
have little or no influence on society" 

— Mark Twain 

Woman are meant to be loved, nut to 
be understood" 

— Oscar Wild* 



"Love is the 
force capable 
of transforming 
an enemy into a 
friend" 

- Martin 
Luther King, Jr. 

1 don't know 
anything about 
music. In my line 
yo* don't hei 

— lb/Is Presley 



"My one regret in life is that I'm not 
■ 

— Woody Allen 

'A hippie is someone who looks like 
Tarzan, walks like iane and smells like 
Cheetah" 

— Ronald Reagan 

"When you a»e down and out 
•■oiTwthma always turns up - usually 
the noses of f 

— Orson Welles 

TV has brought murder back into the 
home where tt belongs ' 

— Alfred Hitchcock 




"I have to 
remind my dad. 
Journalists - no 
matter how many 
cigars they smoke 
wtth you — ate 
not your friends, 
so don't talk to 

— Cameron 
Dlar 



;**' 




Diaz 



"Being a celebrity is probably the closest 
to being a beautiful woman .»* you can 

— Kevin tostner 

pit say that I must be a 
aerson, but it'wmt true I have 
the heart of a young boy "> a \*< on my 
desk" 

— Stephen King 

"You're not d^ nth* 

floor without twldir 

— Dean Martin 

"Ihats the trouble 

with being me 

At this point, 

nobody Otsrl 1 

damn what my 

problem is I could 

literally have a 

tumor on the side 

of my head and 

they'd be like, 

Yeah, big deal I'd 

eat a tumor every morning foi the kmda 

money you're pulling down '" 

— Jim Carrey 

Run tor office- No I've slept wtth too 
many women, I've done too many drugs, 
and I've been to too many parties " 

— George Clooney 

"I could take Sean (onrvery In a fight I 
could definitely take him " 

— Harrison Ford 

"Charlie Brown is the one person 
I Identify with, cl is such* loser 
He wasn't even the star of his own 
Halloween special" 

— Chris Rodi 

Mum: www.fvodfuotti.tom 




mmmmmm 



SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wildcats improve to 3-0 behind Martin 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS SIATE COILCGIAN 

Cartier Marl in is un a roll, and the 
K Statu men's basketball team can only 
hope he keeps tolling through the com- 
petition 

Martin posted his third straight 20- 
puini performance, helping the Wildcats 
stay perfect to start the season K-State 
defeated Stephen F Austin 71-54 Satur- 
day night in Branikige Coliseum to move 
to 3-0 

Coach |im Wouldridge, who notched 
his 300lh career win, said lie didn't have 
enough nice words to say about Martin, 
his developing star. 

He's playing awfully well.' 
Wooldndge said of Martin "He's mak- 
ing all the big shots for us He's mak- 
ing all the big free throws. He's getting 
all the big rebounds. He's playing a ton 
of minutes, so that's good to see out QJ 
him." 

Martin again was the main offensive 
threat for the Wildcats, finishing the 



game with 24 points on 7-u(-l 1 shool- 
inj; With seveiv rebounds, he was (us( 
shy ol his third ■araighl double-double 

"I'm just going out and trying i" 
produce, trying tn help my team win 
Martin said. "That's all I can say about 
thai" 

In addition to Martin s strong night, 

senior forward Dramana Diana emerged 

to produce his first complete gall 
the season. Diarra lied a school record 
with six blinks and also chipped in with 
sis point! and four rebounds 

Diarra was a force on the defensive 
end, holding Antuane Miller, the Lorn 
berjacka' leading scorer entering ihe 
game, to just eight points on 4-<>l I I 
shouting 

"( Dramatic) was everywhere, he 
played great," sophomore forward David 
Hoskins said. "1 told him we need him 
to play like thai every night He was fly- 
ing eve ryw lure, making blocks, helping 
out scoring, rebounding He was doing 
everything," 

Wooldndge said he was pleased with 



K State 71 Stephen F. Austin 54 





KStatc 


SFA 


Held goals 


23-56 


25-63 


) point 


j-8 


415 


free throws 


n-it 


0-5 


Rebounds 


44 


33 


Assists 


21 


18 


Turnovers 


18 


17 


leading scorer 


Martin, 24 


PaetU 


leading rebou rider 


Hoskins, 8 


Clark, 7 


leading assists 


Taybron, t> 


Clark, 12 



the way his big man came to play 

"(Dramane) was great," Wooldridge 
said "He was active. He got off his feet 
quick, got to the ball quick He played 
with energy, and he played athletic" 

It was Diarra who anchored a strong 
defensive showing from the Wildcats, 
particularly in the first half 

S« M£N Page 8 




CatrlnaR«w»on|(OllfGtAN 

Going to the basket, K- State's Cartier Martin 
attempts to shoot over Stephen F. Austin 
defenders Saturday evening. 



WOMEN' S BASKETBALL 

Dietz leads 
K-State past 
Santa Clara 



By Angle Hanson 

K*NS*S STATE (Oil EGI»N 

The K-State women's basket- 
ball team didn't have much time 
to let its turkey dinners settle 
over the Thanksgiving break 

On Saturday, the Wildcats 
grabbed their second victory of 
the season in a 100-71 victory 
over the Santa Clara Broncos in 
Santa Clara, Calif 

Tonight, they head north to 
complete their two-game road 
swing, as they take on the Wyo- 
ming Cowgirls at home in Lara- 
mie, Wyom. 

The Wildcats lead the series 
against the Cowgirls 2*1, but 
this is their first ever appear- 
ance in Lara- 
mie - home 
of the nation's 
highest home- 
court elevation 
220 feet 
inside Arena 
Auditorium 
Last year, the 

Cowgirls (2*0) 
Dlttt wm , tne Wi]l j. 

bUMD ta(s . fj rs( op . 

ponents of the 2004*05 season, 
and the Cats breezed by Wyo- 
SS 42 K State (20) will 
face a similar squad this year, 
as the Cowgirls return 11 letter 
winners and three starters 

Hit (. us enter tonight's 
match up feeling comfortable 
after handling of the Broncos 
(0-3), a team that won its West 
Coast Conference Champion- 
ship last year and lost this sea- 
son at No 1 1 Georgia by one 
point, 92-91 

In Saturday's game, K- State's 
veterans led the Wildcats, with 
sophomore Kimberly Dietz col- 
lecting a team- and career-high 
23 points junior Twiggy Mc- 
Intyre stepped up with 17 points, 
and junior Claire Coggins 1HI 
lowed suit with 13 The guards 
combined for a school record 
15 3-pointers In addition, all 1 1 
Wildcats made the scoreboard, 
the second time this season ev- 
ery player has contributed 

Coach Deb Patterson said 
she was happy with what she 
saw 

"For where we're at, it was 
a good win for our basketball 
team," Patterson said. "We ve 
got a lot of respect for Santa 
Clara, so that was a significant 
win on the road" 

Because the Broncos put 

Set WOMEN Page! 





'I am happy because I have these great Wildcat fans and staff 
players, but I will miss them a lot, and that is a sad feeling." 



Agat a Reiende 
0UTSI01 HirTFH 



Senior sen 



ft 



ff 



Crtrlrw Ramon | COLLEGIAN 
Senior outside hitter, Agata 
Rezer.de, thanks fans following 

the Oklahoma game. 

By Mark Potter 

KANSAi STATE C0LIEGI AN 



K-State ends season with 20 
wins for 7th consecutive year 



The K-State volleyball team 
concluded its regular season 
on a positive note Saturday, 
reaching the 20-win plateau 
for the seventh consecutive year. 

"It was one of our goals in the be- 
ginning of the year to try and get at 
least 20 wins, so 1 feel good about 
the fact that we were able to accom- 
plish that." coach Suzie Fritz said 

No. 25 K-State (20-10, 11-9 Big 
12) swept past Oklahoma (7-22, 2- 
18), 3-0 (30-17, 30-25, 50-28) 

With the win, K-State wrapped up 
sole possession of fourth place in the 
Big 12 Conference. 

"We were picked sixth or sevenlh 
in the preseason, and the three teams 
ahead of us are ranked in the lop 10 
in the country, so I Ihink (fourth 
place) is pretty good for a young 
team," Fritz said 

Sophomore Rita Liiiom, who 
played the entire match against 
Oklahoma, led K-State with 13 kills 
on 26 attempts. 

"I was so excited when I saw the 
stats," Liiiom said "I am thankful to 
my team and my coaches btcaUM 
tluy helped me. It just feels good to 
be on a good team" 

Outside hitter Sandy Werner 
added 1 1 kills on 25 attempts, while 
middle blocker joy Hamlin notched 
a match-high eight block assists 

After K-State won the first game 
with relative ease, Oklahoma proved 
to be more of a challenge in games 
two and three 

Liiiom and Werner each had sev 
en kills in game two, which helped 
K-State take a 2-0 lead in the 
match. 

The Wildcats and Sooners traded 
points in game three, forcing 14 ties 

Oklahoma built a 22-18 lead, but 
K-State quickly tied the game at 22 
22. 

The Wildcats recaptured the lead 
and held on to win, 30-28. 

K State hit 292 for the match, 
while Oklahoma managed a 126 hit- 
ting percentage. 

After the match, President [on 
Wefald, director of athletics Tim 
Weiser, Fritz and 667 fans thanked 
four Wildcats who played their last 
home match: Hamlin, outside hitters 

See VOLLEYBALL Pag* 8 




Catrina Ramon | OtUCMM 
K- State's middle blocker Rita Liiiom attempts to hit over Oklahoma's Julie Chester Saturday after 
noon at Ahearn Field House. 



Colorado fans add to reputation as worst fans in Big 12 Conference 



As if the University of Colo- 
rado needed to taint its image 
any further, the Buffalo fans go 
and one-up 
their football 
team. 

Colorado fans 
hove long had 
the reputa- 
tion of being 
the wont far* 
in the Big 12 
Conference. 
In Friday's 
30-3 loss to 
- Nebraska, the 
Colorado students did little to 
refute that claim, 




MICHAEL 
ASHFMO 



During the fourth quarter, 
with the Buffaloes Hailing 27-3, 
many Colorado students began 
throwing debris and trash onto 
the field 

The officials stopped the 
game for about Ave minutes 
while Polsom Field security 
cleared sections 1 16 and 1 17, 
and many students were escort- 
ed out of the stadium entirely 

Play eventually resumed, but 
the damage had been done, 

Colorado is already under 
enough heat because of coach 
Gary Bamett and the alleged 
recruiting sex scandals of the 
last few years. 



Now the Colorado faith- 
ful go and prove to the nation 
how classless they really are out 
there in the mountain air. 

It's no secret Colorado is a 
liberal university 

But how funny is it that the 
students who claim to be peace- 
loving, carefree and tolerant of 
others feel the need to trash 
their stadium's field In a display 
of sheer intolerance? 

Colorado's liberal students 
are tolerant of others as long 
as they are the ones ben- 
efitting. Once Ihe tables are 
turned though, all thoughts of 
tolerance and acceptance are 



thrown out the window. 

If Colorado fans want some- 
thing to be upset about, they 
should turn their anger on Bar- 
nett and his program filled with 
thugs, cheaters and liars 

Sure, Bamett has won some 
games at Colorado, and for 
the second straight season, has 
backed into the Big 12 Confer- 
ence Championship Game by 
virtue of an Iowa State loss, but 
at what cost? 

The man does not know the 
meaning of the word ''humble " 
and Is as paranoid as they 
come. He has publicly an- 
nounced hit disdain for former 



K State coach Bill Snyder, who 
exudes class and digiinv 

Bamett has run a dirty pro- 
gram at Colorado and somehow 
has escaped major NCAA pen- 
alties. 

But in the end, Bamett i.s 
simply a reflection of the kind 
of environment a liberal univer- 
sity such as Colorado fosters, 
and the Colorado students' ac- 
tions Friday do little to prove 
otherwise, 



MkhaetKiMorsaiMetelnprlRt 

jtWnMHR- TDM CM 9HRM M*H n 

lssfMts«eiJbu.isV. 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



Sunday NFL Scores 

New Means 21 Carolina H 

NYJels 19 Buffalo * 



Baltimore 29 
Cincinnati 42 

New England 16 
Kama- City 26 

13 

10 



Chicago 
l.imp* Bay 

St. Louis 

Hctaaw 

Jacksonville 
Arizuna 

NY Giants 
Seattle 



H 

27 

24 

17 

21 
24 



San Iran U 

Tennessee 13 

Cleveland U 
Minnesota 24 

San Diego 21 
Washington 

Miami 
Oakland 



U 

21 



Green Bay 14 
Philadelphia 19 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

NFL | Chiefs down Patriots 
behind Wesley's 3 INTs 

KANSAS CITY. Ma — It's time for 
people to start taking notice when Greg 
Wesley makes bold predictions. 

Right before a game against Miami 
in 2002, Kansas City's free safety said he 
would get three interceptions, and did. 
Then Sunday he picked off three of lorn 
Brady's passes after telling teammates 
he would, and Sammy Knight grabbed , 
a fourth in a 26- 16 victory over the 
injury tattered New England Patriots 

Larry Johnson, with his fourth 
straight outstanding game, ran for 1 19 
yards and a touchdown as the Chiefs 17- 
4) stayed within two games of Denver 
in the AFC West. The Patriots (6-5) 
remained two games ahead of Buffalo 
In the less-competitive AFC East. 



NFL | Former Cowboys 
receiver trvin arrested 

PIANO, Texas — Former Dallas 
Cowboys receiver Michael I rv in was 
charged with misdemeanor posses- 
sion of drug 
paraphernalia 
after police 
searched his 
vehicle dunng 
a traffic stop. 
Piano police said 
Sunday. 

Irvln.a 
semifinaiist for 
the Pro Football 
Hall of Fame, 

was arrested on an outstanding warrant 
for speeding in Irving after being pulled 
over Friday afternoon for speeding in 
Piano, the Ptano Poftce Department 
said Police spokesman Mike Johnson 
said he didn't know what kind of 
paraphernalia was found 

Irvm paid a fine on the speeding 
iKkel and posted bond un the drug 
paraphernalia possession charge He 
was released about an hour after he 
was pulled over 




Irvin 



GLF | Sans skirt, Funk wins 
Skins Game with $925,000 

LA QUINTA, Calif. - What a Skins 
Game it was for f red Funk, who went 
from wearing a pink skin on the third 
hole to walking 
away with nearly 
all the money. 

"Wow" Funk 
said in disbelief 
Sunday on the 
18th green, 
where he'd just 
won the final 
SSSO.000 
and six skins, 
for a total of 
S925,000 and IS skins in his first try 

F Link had a two putt birdie on the 
par S 18th, then clinched the ream! 
setting victory when Ttgjer Woods 
missed an 8-foot birdie pun 

Ihe 49- year-old Funk became the 
oldest Skins Game winner and took all 
5/00.000 available on Sunday 




Funk 



CFB | Tennessee's Fulmer 
fires 2 assistants 

KNOXVILLUenn lennessee 
coach Phillip fulmer fired offensive 
assistants Jimmy Ray Stephens and 
Pat Washington on Sunday, following 
the Volunteers' first losing season since 
1988 

Stephens, 51, was the offensive 
line coach and had been at Tennessee 
for three years Washington, 42, was 
wide receivers coach and had been with 
the program for 10 years 

"I appreciate everything Jimmy 
Ray and Pat have done for Tennessee 1 
over the years," fulmer said In a st.it<- 
ment - 1 



College Football 



1 Southern Ca I 
2. Tinas 
I LSI 

4 Penn State 
SVkgtoUTech 
A. Ohio State 
7. Now Dame 
(Oregon 

9 Auburn 

10 Miami Ufa) 

Other Big U teams 
.MmuTedi 



APTopIO 



11 1 

11-0 
10-1 

10-1 
'KM 
SV2 
M 
9-1 
9*2 
9-1 



9-2 






CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



I I ■ I L |i I I i i ii | | i ■ l l || 

L 1 1' .! " ' L 1 :: L 1 f J ss *!}„ ■■ : 

LET'S RENT 



1101 
Fqr Rent- 

Apt. 
Unfurnished 



820 COLORADO Base- 
men I efficiency 420 square 
feet Patio, fenced yard, 
lighted parking Shared ulilit- 
NO PETS. January 
lease S275 (78S)776-6548 

A LARGE one- bed room. 

Available January 1 Close 
lo campus Washer' dryer 
t704 Fairview (785)317- 
7713. 

DUPLEX CLOSE to cam- 
pus Off street panting Spa- 
ciou". two bedroom, two 
bath Available January 1st 
(785)460-8835 

LIVF ONLY halt block tram 

cam put and walk to class 
DOR1 base- 
ment apartment $400 plus 
electric I all other utilities 
paidT Available now with 
I Emerald 
Profit MmaQcnwnl 

( 785 )& c j€> 6899 

NEW TWO-BEDROOM du 
plex bast lo campn 

No 
no pets. [7851539- 

ONE BEDROOMS S37P 
$.l9d three- bedrooms 
$700 S82S (785)537-7701 



THREE-8EDROOMS 
AVAILABLE now Close to 
campus Water* trash paid 
Central air, coin-operated 
laundry (766)537 7810 
(785)537 2- 

TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX 

Avail, i tile now I 

Iftaa '-lrn.nl B(|| pkB| 

$550 roperty 

Management (785)556 

6899, 



have your own b«* 
room Four-bedfon'i 
bath Walk-in closets 
BRAND NEW DUPLEX 
Close lo Aggwville Ml 
pus Available now I 

Man . n i'i 
(TflSfSM MM 



For Rent- 
Houses 



LOOK BRANO 
House 722 Osuq> 
bedroom two bain, washer/ 
dryer, n :>ets ne- 

gotiable (7851556-1281 or 
i 

i ii n - t nt DROOM 
THREE blocks soulh ol Ag- 
gieville Spacious, i 
dryer, stove, refrigerator, 
central air S675 (785)537- 
9425 or (785)532-4424 



EVERYTHING NEW 

bedroom, two bath house 
with garage West 

■ Enter 

jement. 
(785)555-5899 



FOURBEOROOM THREE 

li.ili' wrl'i I' . ■ : , Mir., Hindi- 
lion Ready to move in All 
appliances No pets $1000 
Emerald Property Manage 
mtM (785)556-6899 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 

bath, r,-. 

pus w . hook 

... ick with grill Quiet 

i m 11 400 

lie immediately Call 
12 1933 or maloner- 
entai<9 yahoo corn 



1451 

Roommate 
Wanted 

BEDROOM AVAILABLE 
January 1 Beautiful three- 
i > two bath house 
near Westioop No oeposil 
Furnished il need- 
ed (785(587-9997. 

JANUARY- AUGUST 

Three- bedroom, $263 plus 
III Phillip 
{91 3(308-0402 

Roomrn I 

lout-bedroom next to cam- 
(Hi a Two bath washer' dry- 
lar No pets 
(785)537-7050 



• 501 



Sublease 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 

needed Rent negotiable 
Please conlarl (785)556- 
0t69 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wnnted Available immedi- 
ately. 10 S301V 

month Dhn onethirrl iililil 
,. . IM'i."M>i:V 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted $?W month Four 
bedroom bouse next to 
campus Pet* allowed. 
Washer/ dryer Chelsea 
P 14)660 194^ 

riOOMMATES MALE Or 
female, pels okay Rent no 
gotlable Washer/ dryer, 
targe yard, one thir. . 
C.iH Jem— 1 785)1 17-5006 

SPRING SEMESTER sub 
ktaser(s) needed Nice, 
cloan apartment Close to 
r.impus and Aggieville 
Cheap bills No i 
Discounted rent: 1225/ 
month Call (785)202-0676 
•J December 

SUBLEASER(S) WANTED 1 

Two-bedroom apartment 

with washer and dryer One 

block from campus 1 Water 

and trash paid CK 

tor location) Call (316)288- 

9629 




Stall 

Olrta 

JIMMY F do your dishes 



I WANT CI..- 

havfl ftl i ' I II wait 

witf ' 



The Collegian reserves 
the rtght lo edit or reject 
ad copy. First or laat 
name* can be accepted in 
ad copy Photo ID re- 
quired if placement Ads 
can be placed In 103 Ked- 
de Hail $2 tor up to 20 
words. 

COACH MO A |efe well 
done Keep pressing on 1 



HAI l rias the best 
staff Hope you had a great 

i LOVE a tew men on the 
ill team But I need 

some <jt then number* 

I LOVE tm K8U Womens 
Basketball learn 

( LOVE YOU Kel' you've 
the greatest boytnend' 



t : F 
down - Blue 






PROUD OF your IT greal 
years Co 



rye .with 
i least you Laura P Blue man 




bujteiin 



0101 



Announcements 



"LEARN TO FLY' 
Flying Club has ' 
and lowe- 

(705)776-1744 

wwwk*u eduAtlc 

wwiboobytixwm check 



menl, t shirts, and gall certlli- 



Lost and Found 

Loat and lound ads can be 
pieced tree tor three daya. 

iOhl BLUE Anr 
noodle with Audit , 
phone, keys, and black and 
orange praaottpOon glasses 
II found call (785)313-1781 
or (78 

0301 



Post a Note 

We require a form of pic- 
ture ID (KSU. drivers II 
cents or other) when plac- 
ing a post a note 

I hom)n»/ 



For Rent- 
Apts. Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per 
son equal opportunity in 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account ot race, 
sei. I am Ilia l status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age. color, national 
origin or ancestry Viola 
lions should be reported 
lo the Director ol Human 
Resources at City Hail, 
1785)587-2440 



1101 

For Rent 

Apt 

Unfurnished 

AVAILABLE SOON 1019 
Houston, I 2 Three-bed- 
room duplex pais d i 
Screened buck por. 



NOW LEASING 



NEWLY REMODELED two 

: 

■■ i nabie rn 

i 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM. 

'tistarv* In i 
pus Water and treat 
Lease starts January first or 
, sooner 1785)672 

ONE AND two bedrooms 
ritral-air 
S5I539- 



110 1 

For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 



• large I Bedroom Apis.' 

,iie • 



rvw <»■ 



WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 

Anderson Villi 
1 hu iha 

$460 tor January 



l507Poynt/m 

2 BO O $600 

NEW carpet & paint 

Gai & water paid 

ISMPoynt/ 

11G 8D » |935 

Washer & Dryer 

ALL Utilities PAID 



537-9004 



MONTH- MONTH Leases 
Two-bedroom, $520 Three- 
bedroom, $620. 1510 Col- 
lege Ave (785)637 2096 



' DROOM APART 

am, dose lo 
campus washer find dryer 
Available immediately Call 
1785)58/0871. 
9268 

GREAT DEAL) Slucto apart 
men! available January 1 
Five or seven month lease 
1340. i 

(785)410-636) or (785)341 
4754 

JANUARY LEASE Two 
bedroom, two bath apart 
menl Brand new. great lo 
cation Two block 
campus One block Irom Ag 
gieville All appliances in- 
cluding washer/ drynr 
(785)317-5326 or (3161640 
1885 

ONI HHJHHI.IM AI'AHl. 

MENTS available now and 
in January Offering semes- 
ter leases, cell MD1 at 
(785)776-3604 




Roommate 
Wanted 

FfMAlE FOR January- 
May Two-bedroom house, 
close to campus. $275/ 
month plos utilities Washer/ 
dry* Call Megan (785)906 
0131 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed Available Decem- 
ber 15 January to May 
$290/ month Pets allowed 
615 Thurston Call 

(785)341 1073 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted lo share two bed 
room apartment $280/ 
month, split electric and rn 
bia bill Call Megan ai 
(402)750-0570 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Three -bed room 
ap admen l hall block ham 
campus $250' mOTtl 
one-third utilities Call 
(785)342-1554 

FEMALE ROOMMATE No 
smoking. Two-bedruom 
apartment Close to cam- 
pus Oil sir eel parking 
Washer' drynr Avan >■ 
mediately (K20)48) 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed Fun. out-going, no 
pels Two-bedrooms avaiia 
We $300/ each (913)486- 
2745 

LOOKING FOR a roommate 
lot a four-bedroom duplex 
Available as soon as possi- 
ble 1112Vattier Cat) 
(785)443-3306 

MALE ROOMMATE needed 
tor large two-bedroom, one 
bath, apartment in West- 
chester Park tennis, fitness 
center available now. Tyler. 
(785)539-8773 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 

Male or female Nice house 
with backyard 
campus Available January 
Andrea (765)341 
2161. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
tour-bedroom house, block 

i i 820)654-6044 

SUBLEASER FOR one of 
lour- bedrooms Um 

lanuajy 

.nthly Cab i. 
washer/ dryer furnished 

walk io ttm 

no drinking, no pets 
1 785)53- 



3101 



Help Wanted 



3301 

Business 
Opportunities 



WHAT AFiF we ji.niiy lo eat 
■ ■ ■ 

eel everyday. Pin- 
ky pe. i nd itily 



- 
I.1M No 
no drinking, no 
pets 1785)539 1554 



three -bed room 

■ aj v\ i rtftj 
'v W i 1 



120 1 

For Rent- 
Mouses 

CLOSE TO campus Three - 

m kitch 

Jen allachmd 

m-l 

l nun fit: DROOM. TWO 
baths, two kitchens veiy 
close to campus (7851776- 
8628 (783)341-4073 

HOUSES FOP rent Close 

,ms Three 
live -bedroom (877)439- 

ONl (IEDROOM WALk. lo 
> la No smoking, no dnnk- 
iny no pels (785)539- 
1554 

THREE BEDROOM BTT 
PL EX, 2303 An, 
$800, available December 
17 (785)537 7138 




3101 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor 
lunlly with reasonable 
caution The Collegian 
urges our readers to con 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau. 501 SE Jefferson 
Topeka. KS 66607-1190 
(785)232-0454 



•<TE IINIVER 
SITY Informal i tin Systems 
i i)tn a Assoiuiie I 
ise Man. i 
Kansas 91 
vxisity It ttattng a senior 
i. manager in lis In- 
torn* Office to 
be responsible for visioning 
planning ,ind managing all 
facets ol dnt.tbase maruige- 
I 

r squire - 
monts iru 

Sctencr Information Sys- 
1 i 

■ imeenng, or 
other ... 



The Collegian cannot veri 
fy the financial potential ol 
sdvertlaemenls in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
auch business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urge* 
our readers to contact the 
Seller Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson Topeka, 
KS 86607-1190 (785)232 
0454 



Manhattan City Ordinance 






46 1 4 assures every per- 




in sys 


son equal opportunity in 




to in 


securing and holding em- 




N *•> 


ployment in any field of 






work or labor tor which 




am/I 


he/ the la properly quali- 


. 




fied regardless nt race. 


mintMra 


rise da- 


■H military stalua, disa- 




appli 


bility, religion, age, color. 




national origin or ances- 


■ 




try Violations should be 




m espenanci? 


reported to the Director of 


I re«i 




Human Resources at City 


<cimicai Mali 


Hall, 1 785)587- 2441 




is required. 




and I'll m-di 




HMRTSN01NQ! I3M I d ij 


Hi arid 


polentu, ' . 


i 


n CTuawasit 






lions server 


ed Call i-eoii | 






144 


■ .: i1iv„ ni'ii. 
al wwv 


i :, 




AUCTION HI ' 
tui candidate win rn, 
ganiie, and proce- 

cbanclise RespOr . 

. inking mer 
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based upon gum ' 
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Subteate 

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from January- August 2006 

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January i May 31 $285/ 

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heal/ air Five mirm 
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in the KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



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betorc you want yout ad 
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ads must be placed by 
4 p.m. two working days 
ptiar to the date you want 
your ad to run 

Call 532-6555 



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each word over 20 

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Go to Kedzle 103 

{across (torn the 

K Stale Student Union). 

Office hours are 

Moncay Ihrough Friday 

tmm 8 am. to 5 p.m 

The office is open 

except on holidays. 



HOW TO PAY 

All classifieds must be 

paid in advance unless 

you have an account 

with Student 

Publications Inc 

Cash, check, 

MasterCard or Visa are 

accepted There is a 

$10 service charge on 

all returned checks 

We reserve the right to 

edit, reject or property 

classify any ad 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service to you, we 

run found ads for three 

days free of charge 



CORRECTIONS 

II you find an error in 
your ad, please call us. 
We accept responsi- 
bility only tor the first 
wrong insertion. 



CANCELLATIONS 

If you sell your ilem 

before your ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

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before noon the day 

before the ad is to be 

published 



HEADLINES 

an extra charge, 
we'll put a headline 
above your ad to catch 
the reader's attention 










Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



PAGEANT | Ross represents Blue Valley in annual competition 



Continued from Page 1 

The judges interviewed the 
contestants Sunday morning, 
followed by yet more rehearsal 
lime. The weekend's activities 
culminated with the public cor- 
onation show on Sunday eve- 
ning 

' 'You have to have a certain 
walk, and posture and things 
like that," Ross said. "I tried to 
practice that every day for like 
an hour." 

During the coronation show, 
the 31 Miss Kansas USA con- 
testants were narrowed down 
tu 15 finalists. These 15 final- 
ists competed once again in the 
swimwear and evening gown 
COfljMtitlOBJ 

These finalists were then 
narrowed down to five, who 
completed another series of in- 
terviews with the judges, After 
deliberating the results from 
these competitions, the judges 
then announced a Miss Kansas 
USA and a runner-up candi- 
date. 

Awards are also distribut- 
ed for special achievement in 
swimsuit, special achievement 
m evening gown and special 
.ii/hievernent in interview. Peo- 
ple's choice awards and honor- 
able mentions are also distrib- 
uted. 

"It was a lot of fun- a lot dif- 
ferent than I thought it would 
be," Ross said. 

Even though she didn't make 
it into the final 15, Ross said 
she enjoyed the experience and 
would like to do it again The 
title of Miss Kansas USA 2006 
went to Ashley Aull, Miss Leav- 
'ii worth County USA 

"All of these girls are com- 
pletely different from my home- 
town," she said. "It's really neat 
to meet people who are doing 
this, but are complete opposites. 
1 met a lot of great people " 




MEN | Wildcats hold Lumberjacks 
to 54 points in Wooldridge's 300th win 



Continued from Page 6 

K- State held Stephen F Austin 

(2-1) to io-of-32 shooting - 
31.3 percent - in the first half, 
helping to create a comfortable 
34-21 halftime advantage. 

The Lumberjacks shot better 
in the second hall, closing the 
deficit to eight points However, 
K-Slate put together a 16-3 run 
to pull away and never looked 
back. 

The Wildcats nut -rebounded 
the Lumberjacks 44-33, and 
were able to force 17 turnovers. 
It all added up to just 54 pi tints 



out of the Lumberjacks, who 
came in averaging 82 points 
per game 

"When you play good de- 
fense, you force bad shots, and 
it's easier to get out on the 
break and get easy transition 
buckets," Hoskins said. 

As for Wooldridge and his 
milestone victory, he wanted 
no attention to be placed on 
his personal accolades 

"I'm just glad we won to- 
night," Wooldridge said "We 
did some things that we can 
build on, and we'll just move 
forward" 



WOMEN | Wyoming offense 
could cause problems for K-State 



Continued from Page 6 

l lie majority of their pressure 
on K State's posts, it opened up 
the guards fur offensive oppor- 
tunities. Patterson said 

We reullv did B nice job of 
taking advantage of what the 
Santa Clara defense was giv- 
ing us," l*alIerson said I think 
their game plan was to piece a 
high priority on our post game 
after watching our Diiruit 
film 

Tile guards and posts worked 
together to compensate for the 
Bucks' defensive execution, and 
that is a good sign for her team 
Still, it is only November, and 
it's loo early to identify what 
the 2005-ni illy do, 



Patterson said 

"It's too early to make any 
qualification on what we're ca- 
pable of," Patterson said. "We're 
off to a good solid start, but 
there's no test like conference 
play" 

The Cowgirls will be another 
test for K-State. Their motion 
offense creates an unpredict- 
able situation for the Wildcat 
defense, Patterson said. 

All her team can do is take 
each game as it comes and not 
tool to far into the future, the 
coach said. 

"I like what I'm seeing," 
Patterson said "Rut we're liv- 
ing in the moment, especially 
with young and inexperienced 
te.mi 



Steven Doll | (01UGIAN 
While competing to become the new Miss Kansas, Alexandra Ross makes her way across the stage In front of 
the judges while participating in the swimsuit portion of the pageant. 



VOLLEYBALL | Hamlin, Perkins forego final year of eligibility 



Continued from Page 6 

Agata Rezende and Katie Stan- 
zel and defensive specialist Jamie 
Perkins. 

Hamlin and Perkins decided 
to forego their final year despite 
having one more season of eligj 
bility 

Rezende said she felt mixed 
emotions in her final match at 



nfTtSot acrpo 

mm 

Call 532-6556 or e-mail: 



Aheam Field House. 

"I am happy because I have 
these great Wildcat fans and staff 
and players, but I will miss them 
a lot, and that is a sad feeling 
Rezende said. 

The weekend got better on 
Sunday, as the Wildcats were 
one of seven Big 12 (cams select- 
ed to the 2005 NCAA Volleyball 
Tournament, marking K Stale's 



lOtli consecutive tournament ap- 
pearance. 

The Rig 12 showcases the 
No 1 overall seed, Nebraska, 
and more teams than any other 
conference in the tournament. 

"I am happy with the fact that 
the Big 12 got seven teams,' f-riiz 
said. "That is just a testament to 
the strength of our conference" 

In (he first round, K-State 



will play at 4 p.m.. Thursday in 
Gainesville. Fla., against Florida 
A&M (22-5), which has won 20 
of its last 2 1 matches. 

If the Wildcats can gel past 
Florida A&M. they would likely 
play SRC Champion Florida (30- 
2) on its home court 

"That is a very difficult first 
and second round draw for us," 
Fritz said 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

GIFT GUIDE 






Monday, November 28. 2005 



This holiday, find the perfect 

i 

gift for everyone on your list 




Homemade Page 3 1 Holiday Movies Page 4 1 Photo gifts Page 5 Column clash Page 6 1 Festive food Page 7 

i 



'age .' 



GIFT GUIDE 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



Holiday gift ideas for loved ones 



!0- 

1 $26+ 1 

1 $25 1 

1 S2 ° 1 
1 $15 

1 $1 ° 1 
1 $5 | 


1 Grandparents 1 

Restaurant 
Gift Certificate 

Coffee Maker ' 
Throw Blanket 


Mom 




Dad 




Brother 




Sister 




Boyfriend 

DVD Box Set 




Girlfriend 

Cashmere Sweater 




Friend 


Silk Pajamas 


loots 


Madden NFL 2006 


Pilates Kit (includes 
mat & video) 


K State Hoodie 


Spa Facial 


Leather Gloves 


Utility/Pocket Knife 


Manicure/Pedit 


Sports Watch 


Rosie the Riviter Night 
Light 


Double CO Set 


1 Massaging Foot Spa 


Wallet 


Poker Set 

"Sin City" DVD 


Gourmet Cookbook 


Sports Jersey 


Scrapbooking 
Supplies 


iTunes Music Card 1 


Ptorto Album 


Rod; 


Flannel Pajama Pants 


Movie Passes 


CD or DVD Rack 


Favorite Salon 
Shampoo 

Lotion or Bubble Bath 


(oldstoneGift 
Certificate 


2006 Wall Calendar 1 


Stationary 


2006 Day Planner 


7-Piece Ratchet Set 


Fleece Slippers 


Stocking Cap 


One Time Use 
Digital Camera 


Coffee Mug 


Votive Candle 


Gourmet Coffee 


Video Rental Coupons 


Hair barrettesA dips 


Boxer Shorts 


Framed Pin ure of the 
two of you 


Silly Putty 




i my car' 



Horn an 

tmiHtMimt 



HoUoman 



STREET TALK 

What do you want for Christmas this year? 




Trawl gear because I 

am studying abroad " 

Amanda Sullivan 

SENIOfi IN AROI1UU Mi 




Sullivan 



Codings 




p so I can be 

-iily" 

Rachel Strouts 




"AniPod . and clothes" 

Montreal Devlne 

HINIOKWMIOAI SCIENCE 




"A copy of Perry s 
Handbook for Chemical 
Fngineers, which is 
like a $200 book, and 
movies" 

Kyle Colling! 

iOPHOMOKl ' 
ENCINEERINC. 

Snow boots because of 
that snowy day a tew 
weeks aqn 

Meghan Butler 

IRISHMAN IN PRf 

CROIESSlONALBUV'.i 

ADMINISIKAUON 




s^ "More money because 

then I can just gel what 
I want." 

Janelle Franklm 
MOfif IMiANIM- 
FACES AM HWU 



m 



my (,u insurance" 

Erattut Odongo 

I REDMAN IN i* 



IESIGN 




Franklin 



Odongo 




"Some cowboy boots * 



Cody Gear hart 

MNICiK l<i PARI MAN Mt( 
HINT AMD CONSEI 




"An IPod." 

Andy Wilcox 
iEMQUNMUENi 

AND MANAM MINI 



Strouts 



Devine 



Butler 



Gearhart 



Wilcox 



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New local* owned Mint store. 

Order mmm, in credit card ntctisary. 

f f M delivery on local orders. 



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Gift Ideas From flaflin 



Books make gr eat gifts ! 
Friends, Lovers, 
Chocolate 



olid a; 
airdosT 

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Christmas 

appointments! 

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785-565-0612 



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2 GREAT SPECIALS 

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Know f omeone who loves ice cream? 
Get em' a Shakes Gift Card they make 
area* srotkina stuffen ! 



Now serving Holly Jolly 
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Try our speciality coffees 
.99 on Dec. 3 



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10% OFF ' ' $1 OFF ' 

ITH K-STATE ID, I WITH THIS AD i 




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Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



GIFT GUIDE 



Page 3 



Homemade gifts 
make holidays fun 

Hand-crafted gifts a thrifty way to spruce up holiday presents 



Electronics top list 
of must-have gifts 



By Emily Lawrcnc* 

KANSAS STATE COU EGIAN 

College students are known for 
having nearly empty wallets most of 
tin time. 

However, when the holidays 
are near, money can be even more 
scarce. 

Here are some hand-crafted items 
that can fit into college students' bud- 
gets 

Five minute fleece scarf 

Supplies: 
-1/8 yard fleece 
-Fabric Ribbon 
-Thread or Fabric Glue 



and the back of the other 
While the glue is drying you can decorate the 
front of the shirt with paint pens M fabric paints 
When glue has dried, stuff shirt through the col 
lar trying to distribute the stuffing evenly. Then, 
glue the collar together (if it wont stick together 
it helps to pin it while it dries). Don't forget to 
include directions with the gift explaining that 
the sleeves can be fastened with Velcro around 
the shoulder strap of a seat belt while driving. 
This is great for kids who have to endure the 
long drive to grandma's for the holidays 




4 



i 



1 



r 



Directions: 

Before you design the bookplate, go online and 
find a fun guote about reading and a picture of 
the recipient s favorite literary character. Then, 
go to www.overy.mm and download the 6464 
10 label template that has "From the Desk of:" 
at the top. Open the template in Microsoft Word 
and change desk to library and insert the name 
of the person the gift is for. Then, at the bottom, 
add the quote and replace the template picture 
with your own Now you can print the labels, 
cut them apart and place them in the small 
envelope. Tie them to a good book and you'll be 
ready to give the gift of reading 

Coffee Liqueur 

Supplies: 
-5 cups of sugar 

8 cups of water 

-Icup of instant coffee 

-5 Tbsp vanilla extract (no imitation vanilla) 

-1/2 Bottle (750 mi) of vodka (the cheapest 

vodka will work great, just look for it on the 

bottom shelf) 

-Small bottles 

Labels 



J 



Book Plates 

Supplies: 

-Avery 16464 Labels 

-Small Velum or plastic envelope 

Scissors 

-Computer with Microsoft Word 



Directions: 

Sew or gtue ribbon about three inches 
from each of the short edges of the piece 
of fleece. Then, make cuts up to the 
ribbon about 1/2 inch apart Roll up the 
scarf and tie with leftover ribbon This is 
great with a matching beanie or gloves 

T-shirt travel pillow 

Supplies: 

T shirt 

Fabric glut: 

Stuffing 

5 inch strip of Velcro 

Paint pens or fabric paint 

Directions: 

Glue bottom of shirt together. Then, do 
the same to the sleeves of the T-shirt 
Glue the Velcro to the front of one sleeve 





Directions: 

Heat sugar and water until It boils and sugar is 
completely dissolved. Remove from heat and let 
it cool to room temperature Mix all ingredients 
together Putt It jnd let it sit at least i month. 
Label the bottles and put them m gift baskets 
wit h a lew glasses from the dollar store or a 
recipe for a white Russian Other liqueur recipes 
can be found on the Internet but this is an easy 
starter drink that will warm the season. 

Phoiot by Catrlna Rawion nil (GlAN 




By Eileen Laux 

KANSAS S1AH Cull MAN 

Many technological 
gifts arc popular this hoi 
iday season And if 
ion is thinking about gh 
ing one, there are places 
around Manhattan to 
look for it. 

Prank Beer, owner ol 
Modern Electronics Inc., 
hU Inn Riley islvil 
there are Ihree gifts thai 
are the "hottest" right 

Mp3 players, satellite 

radio and digital inta 

products are the I 

most m demand. 

He said the n 
ular type of mp3 player 
is the iPod, hut the 
other types out th i 
cheaper Hie il'od usu- 
ally costs anywhere in mi 
$200 to $350 

He said tl i tra- 

il $.50 
i Sinus and \M are 
among the most popular 
brands, and then ii usu 

. ice thai i" 
sign up for included in 
the price 

Digital imaging prod 

ucts are anything relat- 
ed to pi i 

printer* The 

and printers usually run 

from $100 to $200, but 



IlK 

sells bundle! of the earn 
era and printer for v 

insumen 
want other places around 
Manna sail the 

same things 

■ i ompetii will 

drive i in . 

get people in buy the 
produ m," he 

from 

(inline W 

best chi I 

|p peopli 
d mote n 
furing ild to 

them nil i 

vim the righl th 
mil the 

other day and I didn't 
CDUSC 

i didn't think it w 

rigl i • 
lU 

be Intemel 

Hid Mud- 
Inc. has 
the eustoj ce ihe 

met lacks 
Chris L> 
i.i the K Stale s ■ 

in Coropul 
said the) have previous 
genci b for 



id S*^ 
in said this would 
be <i I par- 

ilieir col 
I 
at Chrutun Also 

dels ui IPods 

om $9Uto 

■ putei 

which re- 
academic iden 

lie said even I hough 

the htil 

dents focultj 
and 

■ 
bee a i 

ster 

"I V' 

a hot 
gift again On 

Lot 

ising to ■ 
Techno! • 

are b 

benefit ol new technol 



Give the 
^***^& relaxaticrn 

Mia mi * ^f 

T OLmAy 

PAGKS.QES 



shear 

wnewsi e>rs i ■■i.!'ji«->mr*j 

dynamics 

1125 Laramie 
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• Gift Certificates Available 






• Redeem at any Aggieville business 

e herchandiie 

New T-shirts and Hits only SIS 

He Advantage Card) 
Save every time at your favorite 
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• The Great tastes ol Agtjievtll* for $ I S 

1 





785-776-8050 www.affgievilk.org P.O. Box 1804 



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IP* 



Heed A Great Gift Idea? 

Send A K5U Cheeos and Meat Box I hie Year! 

KSU Dairy &ar offer© custom 
built cheese and meat boxes or 

tthe new K -State Selset 
Boxes featuring the 

NEWIn-STATT 3ELECT CHEESE 

Only Available at the K5U 

*ffoiry Bar 

Call u» ml &32-1292 to have a brochure »ent to you or 
stop by 144 Call HUH to place your order. 



"•^•^^••■•■••J*! 



Page 4 



GIFT GUIDE 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



Movies allow break 
from holiday stress 



By KHsten Roderick 

KANMS STATE (OUEGIAN 

For those who want to give 
families and friends a break 
from work and school dur- 
ing the holiday season, movies 
could be the perfect gift 

Brandon Nelson, junior in 
engineering, said this Christ- 
mas he wants a lot of movies, 
"Mr and Mrs. Smith" and "Bat- 
man Begins" to name a few He 
said he has about a dozen mov- 
ies currently. 

Nelson said one of his fa- 
vorite Christmas gifts was the 
complete "Lord of the Rinns 
trilogy. 

"1 asked for it, but I was very 
happy to get it," he said 

Travis Hudson, junior in 
mass communications, said 
already has the movies he 
wants, but he would buy "Of- 
fice Space" or the "Family Guy 
Presents; Stewie Griffin - The 
Untold Story" for others 

Both are really funny and 
good to watch for a good laugh 
with family and friends," he said 
"Both are also fairly cheap." 

"Sex in the City" would also 
at the top of his giving list, if it 
weren't so much money, Hud- 
son said 

lis a good gift although it's 
about $300 for the entire six 



seasons," he said, 

While new movies can be 
a relaxing gift for students, 
friends and family, sometimes 
old Christmas classics can put 
people in the holiday mood 

Hudson said "A Christmas 
Story" has been a part of his 
Christmas tradition for a while. 

"It was simply a classic," he 
said "It kind of reminded me 
of my childhood, but it was su- 
per Nintendo instead of a Red 
Rider BB gun." 

However, Hudson said since 
TBS began airing it so often on 
Christmas day, he was burnt 
out of the movie 

Nelson said his favorite 
Christmas classic is the "Na- 
tional Lampoon's Vacation" 
with Chevy Chase 

"It's milk-out -of- my-nose 
funny." he said, 

Rachel Riedel, junior in el- 
ementary education, said her 
favorite movie is the animated 
version of "How the Grinch 
Stole Christmas." 

"I like it because 1 remember 
my dad singing you're a mean 
one, Mr Grinch' after the mov- 
ie would stop and then he'd put 
us to bed," she said, 

She said she also liked "Ru- 
dolph the Red Nose Reindeer" 
in claymation 

it's so cute," Riedel said. 



Music albums make fun, 
easy gifts for Christmas 



By Holly Kramer 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

When looking for that perfect 
gift, remember to check the latest 
music releases 

For the dance music enthu- 
siast, Madonna's new compact 
disc, "Confessions of a Dance 
Floor." received 3 1 17 stars out of 
five in Rolling Stone 

In the first week of his release, 
Kenny Chesney's album, "The 
Road and The Radio," debuted 
at no. 1 on Billboard's chart. 50 
Cent also made the Top Ten list 
with the soundtrack from his 
movie, "Get Rich or Die TYyiiT 

Adam Atavichitchang, Hast- 
ings employee, said more nip 
albums are being purchased than 
any other type of music right now. 
On Hastings' top 40 list, five out 
of the 10 top sellers are rap art- 
ists Even so, Atavichitchang said 
sales are lower than last year 

"I hear most people come in 
here saying that they might as 
well just bum a CD they want," 
Atavichitchang said "We've been 
selling more music accessories, 
like mp3 players than albums," 

Hastings top 40 list had Nick- 
elback's "All the Right Reasons" 
as the best seller, with Kanyc 
West's " Late Registration" album 
as the sixth top seller 

Levi Teeter, Sam Goody em- 
ployee, said people have been 
buying the 'Walk the Line' 



soundtrack and also the "Get 
Rich or Die Tryin" soundtrack. 

"We're waiting for the System 
of a Down' album to come out 
and we know that will be really 
popular," Teeter said. "Also, the 
Chamillionaire CD is supposed 
to sell very well." 

Teeter said some people would 
be surprised to hear the Regis 
Philbin Christmas CD is a quite 
popular album around the holi- 
days. 

"The older customers seem to 
like that album a lot," Teeter said 

Hillary Unrein, senior in soci- 
ology, said she wants several al- 
bums for Christmas this year. 

"I really want the new Fiona 
Apple CD," Unrein said. "I heard 
it's amazing. I also would buy the 
newest Kelly Clarkson album for 
me and maybe a Rascal Flatts CD 
for my mom." 

Other people said they choose 
albums because of the artist 

"I'd buy the new Kenny 
Chesney CD," said Maeredith 
Morris, sophomore pre-health 
professions program, because I've 
seen him in concert twice and 
he's hot," 

Some students said they prefer 
downloading music 

"If you don't want to buy a CD, 
you could buy someone a gift cer- 
tificate to iTunes" Clark Griffiths, 
senior in political science, said. 
"That way, people can download 
the music that they want." 




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Top music lacks merit, creativity 



Columnist's top 10 albums of the year 




By Mark Sibtlla 

KANSAS S1MK0UEGIAN 

Bells are ringing, snow is 
falling, and evenings are spent 
with a case of beer, a favorite 
blanket and a comfy chair 
pulled close to the fireplace It's 
the most wonderful time of the 
year - of course ! am talking 
about the music world's annual 
listing of I he top 10 albums of 
the year 

I must warn you the majority 
dl Ihcse albums are or its thai 
many people in the general 
population have not heard 

Major label releases are 
becoming more homogenous, 
profit-driven and focus-group 

tested; En order to crate ,< 

product that sells to the largest 
audience possible, things like 
artistic merit and creativity arc 
lost Now. I present my top ten 
albums for 2005: 

1 0. LCD Soundsystem, "LCD Soundsys 
tern:" James Murphy - half of production 
duo The Df A fulfills the promise of hi* 
early singles and creates a debut album full 
of hip- shaking beats and a hipsters list of 
musical influences, A second disc of singles 
makes this essential 

9. M.I.A., "Arular;' This London-based, 
Sri Lanka refugee artists debut album was 
preceded by an almost insurmountable 
level of hype Amazingly, she manages to 
live up to it by delivering an assorted mess 
of genres, beats, and raps 

8. Spoon, "Gimme Fiction:'' Britl Daniel's 
lews based band Spoon is quite possibly 
one of the best America has to offer This 
eclectic fifth effort finds bass-driven funk 
neirt to piano driven dirges next to spry, 
guitar driven songs The amazing aspect 
is Daniel's ability to metd these different 
styles into an arreting full length 

7. Kany* Wert, "Late Registration:" 

Hip hop had a pretty poorshnwin 
year; the genre that used to rule the world 
seemed to be endlessly spinning its wheels 
with new artists and albums. West's 
sophomore effort takes hip hop back to 
school and marries clever samples with a 
unique world view creating the best album 
the genre tias had all year 

6. The New Pornographers "Twin tin 
ema:" Pop-music is not dead, it has just 
disguised Itself as a Canadian indie rock 
supergroup featuring punchy guitars, un- 
believably tatchy melodies, and wonderful 
harmonies, "Twin Cinema" Is undeniably 
the band's most consistent and enjoyable 



effort yet 

5. Antony and The Johnsons, "I Am 
a Bird Now;" This sexually-ambiguous 
singer/sonowntef has a heavenly, ethereal 
voice that brings tales of abuse and long 
ing an extra emotional heft. Along with 
his piano, a sparse backing band and a 
bevy of vocal guests, such as Lou Reed and 
Devendra Banhart, this album is one of 
delicate and sorrowful beauty 

4. The Decemberists, "Picaresque:" 

Colin Meloy spins his usual diverse literary 
tales of love, death, failure and revenge. 
This time, the backing musical arrange 
ments are as varied as ever and perfectly 
complement his storybook yams His nar- 
ratives are made more effective by treating 
characters with whom we can empathize 
and relate Their best effort 

1 , Sufjan Stevens, "Illinois.'" This 
competent singer/songwriter ambi 
tiously wants to create an album that 
represents all SO slates in the USA This is 
only number two (after 2003 s beautifully 
serene "Michigan "), but after going 2 tor 1 
creating albums full of the sights, sounds 
and histories of the state compacted into 
lush orchestral arrangements — one is 
eager to see Stevens succeedathtsimpres 
si w goal. 

2. My Morning Jacket, "Z:" After gaming 
a new keyboardist and guitarist, teaming 
up with a new producer and shaving nearly 
thirty minutes off of their usual album 
lengths, Kenluclrybased My Morninq 
lacker have treated a masterpiece by 
expanding their Southem-rock influenced 
sound to new heights. Front man Jim 
lames' otherworldly voire floats over 

the band's ambitious arrangements, and 
the album builds to the powerful, nearly 
tenminutetlosingtrac(i,"Dondante"a 
song that slowly builds, explodes and then 
descends into silence 

1. Wolf Parade, "Apologies to the 
Queen Marjp" Modest Mouses Isaac Brock 
discovered this hand, got them signed to 
label, Sub Pup, and then produced then 
deb til album Ho album this year is as 

:] and exciting to listen tu , 
group's wild first a I bum With catchy songs 
about loss, ghosts and an» lety towards the 
world, this album can be listened to and 
examined on headphones or danced to 
and blared over speakers at a party with 
an equal amount of ease Lyrics can mean 
as much or as little as you want, and the 
band's influences are easy to spot but they 
never sound derivative I don't thi 
a coincidence that for two years In a row, 
the best album of the year has come from 
Montreal (Arcade fire's "Funeral") I can't 
wait to hear what these boys will have 



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GIFT GUIDfc 



Page 5 



It's a wrap 




Cllrinj Rawion 1 1 



Creativity provides substitute to traditional paper 



By Emily Lawrence 

KANSAS sTAHCOUEGIAN 

Presents are noi the only gifts 
to give (he) holiday 

rations and donl hsvt to 
be stored in an attic or basement 
lor 11 tin nit lis out of the year. 
This season, students can ditch 

the traditional boxet with bows 
and add khim pfaoazi to \ 

holiday decor 

1. Peppermint pretty 

Two paper plates 
Red marter 
Cellophane 
Ribbon 
Tape 

Directions 

I Draw three swirling secttons on the 
raised side of one of the papei plate! and 
color the section* with a red marker. 



2. Brown bagging it 

Supplies; 
Paper lunch b#j 
Hole punch 
Craft edge scissors 
Ribbon 
Shred or tissue paper (optional) 

Directions 

1 . Cut the top of the bag witbtraft edge 

sciisors 




3. Sock 'em 

Supplies: 

- 2 pieces rfmrstnittton paper (can be 

replaced with craft foam S 

Hole punch 
■ Ribbon 

Shred or tissue paper 

Directions 

1 Place two pieces of paper together and 

trace the shape of a stocking on to them 






2 Fold top 2 inches of bag over 






2 Cut out the 

i Punch holes around 
the outside apt 
mately 1/2 inch apart 









2, Place gift inside the two paper plates 
and tape the edges together to securely 
hide the gift. 



i Punch two holes in the center 1 to 2 
inches apart 




« 




4.Foldtepofstociiinq 

down and punch hole. 

center about 
■■ ' 
5. String ribt 

jn the holes 
starting at It* 
left of the stocking, 
endbig at the top 
right. 
6 Ml stock , 

present and shredded filler if needed. 

7. Fold top of stocking balk down and 

string ribbon from the back through the 

two holes and tie 




! Roll cellophane around the plates and 
secure with tape. Twist ends and secure 

them with ribbons 



4. Put present In bag fill with tissue or 
shred to stuff the bag and refold top string 
ribbon through holes and tie shut. 




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(And Don't Forget to Treat 

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Photos make creative gifts 



By Amy Bolton 

KANSAS SIATl COLLEGIAN 

Gift pi vers looking for a 
creative spin on the home- 
made gift have started looking 
to photo gifts 

Pictures can be put on ev- 
erything from stamps to coffee 
mugs and can be personalized 
for the recipient. 

"It's a little more personal 
and creative of a gift," said 
Brandi Allen, photo lab asso- 
ciate at Wal-Mart, 101 Blue 
mont Ave, and 2005 K Stale 
graduate in animal science 

Allen said Wal-Marl puts 
pictures on calendars, coffee 
mugs, ornaments, travel mugs, 
mouse pads, playing cards and 
mure. 

Depending un the producl, 
Wal-Mart does some of the 
photo gifts in their phulo lab, 
and others are done through 
its tend ctut service 

Although Allen said the 
mt>,i popular photo item is 
greeting cards, she's seen a 
lot ol pictures put on ceramic 

mugs. 

"It's something you use a 
Imi .myways so you'll see the 
picture a lot." Allen said 



Matie Grubhan, pro- 
duction supervisor in 
the copy center at ihe 
Topeka Office Max, said 
it does a lot of 12-month 
calendars, year-in-a- 
vicw calendars, mouse 
pads, student planners 
and teacher planners 

"Around back-to- 
school season we get 
I lot of the planners," 
Grubhan said 

A year-in-a-view calendar 
has a picture in the middle 
and the months around it h k 
a 12-month calendar, they use 
13 photos one for each month, 
and a 13th for the cover 

"It's a good gift idea." Grub 
luii said. 

Another photo gift option 
is to put a personal picture on 
a stamp. 

At www.photo&tamps OOM, 
users upload a digital picture 
to put on a stamp, and with 
in minutes the stamps are on 
their way 

The stamps are legal post 
age and are approved by the 
U.S. Postal Service 

Suggested photo ideas at 
uww.photostamps.com are 
pictures of children, newborn 




babies, animals and pets, spe 
cial occasions such M wed 
dings, family vacations and 
parties or family lun 

A sheet of 20, 37-cent 
stamps costs $16.94. Two to 
nine sheets cos! $14.99 each, 
and additional sheets are 
available at discounted rates. 
Si. mips hi available in many 
different postage values 

The pictures can be 700 rued 
in on, flipped or rotated, and 
bordered by different colors 

Although any of these gills 
can be given year round, both 
Mien and Grubhan said they 
sue an increase In photo gilts 

around I he holiday season, 

"It helps to get a lot more 
personal than just giving them 
a CD or something," Allen 

said 



Local businesses expect rush 



By Eileen Laux 

KANSAS STAtE (.01 [EfjIAN 

With the Christmas shopping 

just around the comer, 

many Manhattan businesses are 

buckling down for svlial may be 

a very busy shopping season 

Sara Strothman, owner of 
Zotds Altire. 1203 Mnro St., 
said the shopping right now is 
:ilv moderate, but she is 
expecting it to pick up in the first 
few weeks of December The 
third week is the largest since 
students are on their way out of 
ind picking up last-minute 
P resents 

Strothman said students can 

Nothing for relatives and 

Is as they go to school. 

She said two big ilems this 

>re coats and party tops 

which are usually wom for New 

Year's Eve, 

Zotcis only carries six pieces 
of each item in order to keep up 



their unique look, Strothman 
said 

"As a girl, you don't wanl to 
show up to a party wearing the 
same thing as another person," 
she said 

She said the coats arc usually 
priced from $65 lo $85 and there 
is a broad price range for shirts 
The store also sometimes hands 
nut 1 0- percent -off coupons lo 
preferred customers and others 
so they can get a reduction on 
merchandise In the store, she 
said 

Strothman said gift certifi 
cates are available and online 
shopping is also a new feature 

"Someone can get a fam- 
ily member a gift certificate and 
they can use that as they shop 
online,'' she said. 

(ill Sherman, assistant man- 
ager at Coach House Gifts in 
Manhattan Town Center and 
K Siate graduate, said, as of 
Thanksgiving break, that it has 



uoi experienced the rush yet. 

She said candles, ornaments 
and small Christmas decorative 
items are very popular among 
consumers 

Sherman said since the store 
is a franchise of Hallmark, there 
will be promotions such as "buy 

three cards and get a discount 
mother item, and promo- 
tiara will run off and on from 
ihe dajl after Thanksgiving until 
Chrisit n as 

Becky Ballard, owner of 
Ballard's Sporting Goods, 1218 
Moro St., said Ballard's is tradi- 
tn aially a last minute store. Busi 
ness will speed up around the 
[ad week of school she said 

V\e generally have a large 
rush when college kids finish 
their finals," Ballard said "You 
can generally tell when the last 
day usually is because of the 
kids who may not be able to get 
K Slate gear near their home as 
presents" 




i> 






M 






- 



Page 6 



GIFT GUIDE 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



Giving the gift of greed 




ION AS 
HOGG 



Tools, video games best choice 
for hoarding Christmas loot 

I lhe terminally greedy, the lingering Christmas question pres- 
ents the impossible challenge. 
"How can I maximize loot this year?" 
Those ol us who know it is better to receive than give face the 
unenviable burden of having to spend our hard earned cheese on 
someone otfiet than the most deserving of our presents, ourselves 
But. enough relatives left giftlcss will 
revoke future Christmas invila- 
tkttts, and stiffing your significant 
Other will lead to a road deprived 
dI much mOK than Christmas 
■nts. 
ir not, for there is a way to 
nuke everyone slightly less unhappy without de- 
priving yourieU of fun new loya With a little bit of 
thought, you *.;m cleverly disguise gifts for 
rts (or * itfiLTs 
A*k most guys, and they will concede the point 
' mi>m lu'inlibur-with-no-arms could 
good tool set - a 1 17-piece Mechanics Tool Set 
from Craftsman should do the trick 

fiiglity clams is no mean bat for the college student, but it's 

ihi iw H your loved ones or barely known neighbors with 
pricey, but useful tool s- 

lid tool set wiih Imufy wrapping paper - something pink, 
with 1 1 a baby |esus, and deploy under the tree with a gigan- 

rniless neighbor improvisation is necessary; wrapping 
paper that can be chewed off is difficult but not impossible.) 

Low end behold, later on in the day you just happen to have a 
projeU thai requires a 1 17-piece Mechanics Tool Set from Crafts- 
Perhapa someone you know has one that you could borrow? 
I or the prj shopping for the girlfriend /wife/boyfriend (hey, we're 
a diverse campus) the double whammy of appearing thoughtful while 
gelling a gifl for yourself is a difficult challenge to overcome. 

Thankfully, thea- exists, deep in the bowels of the Manhattan 
lown Center, 8 den of joy and hope that is known as Victoria's 
I Within, lies the best of both worlds. Buying rosy-scented lo- 
" iii underwear with less fabric than your average shoestring is 
the h show your loved one what's really important to you 

But, baby, I buy these things for you because you are SO sexy, and 
rbra and thong around all day just think how 
coml 'U'll be without all those other clothes. Now you should 

bring iha! rosy smelling lotion over here and give me a back rub so I 
smell good for you." 

eel tif love and caring for your significant other 
that illustrates the depth of your caring and devotion. 

But there is no reason to stop with lingerie. Perhaps your one true 
nice new video game console to play while sporting 
her gifted ments - an Xbox 360 Core System, starting at $450 

the thing to complement lacy undies 
After all, what girl doesn't want the new cutting edge gaming system^* 
te, include that pinnacle of feminine enjoyment the war-sim- 
i Imagine the joy im your girlfriend's face when she unwraps "Steam- 
ing P ' i " and better yet, she'll gladly share her love, and her gift 

>t the hi curded gifts Christmas-time does not have to be all 
ination is all that you need Plan accordingly, spend 

wild! 1 1 1 1 he gi fts you give come boomeranging back into 

your lovini Ing arms 



Joms H»99 K junior In looology, international studies and Russian. Pltaw tend {four 
rai—inti to «pMo«i * ipuD.ttu.ftfu. 





Ballet tickets, pedicures best 
ways to wrangle guys* gifts 

When it comes to buying Christmas 
gite for others, some have one thing in 
^ JV mind: How can I reap the benefits of 
this exchange? For amateurs, it can be 
tricky to pull off generosity and self- 
indulgence at the same time. 

1 learned this gluttonous maneu- 
ver from my father, who is notorious 
for buying me toolkits and Carhart 
apparel (in his size, of course) for 
Christmas. My favorite gift from 
my dad came last year when he 
gave me the book "The Uni- 
verse in a Nutshell" by Steven Hawking. 
Before I finished unwrapping the present, 
my dad had already snatched the book from 
me and scampered into the other room only to 
j. spend the rest of the day reading it. Needless to 

" , say, 1 haven't seen the book since. 

His gift -giving episodes have been 
A going on for most of my life. At age three, 

1 received a designer stapler It wasn't until 
years later that I was allowed to "play" with 
my present and even then 1 was rationed 
staples for most of my childhood 
At age 15, t was given a matching plier and 
wrench set as a stocking sniffer Last time I checked, 
they were residing in my dad's toolbox. 

My dad uses the facade that his gifts will 
make me more cultured and well-rounded, While his 
attempts to cultivate and enlighten me may have failed, 
the real results are much more productive for me I 
have now figured out how to appear to buy gifts for 
others while really buying for myself This technique 
can be especially helpful when "buying" for the opposite 
sex, i.e. boyfriends, fathers, brothers, friends, etc. 

Amateurs should start small with this method, by giv 
ing simpler, less obvious gifts Gifts for fathers could in- 
clude household items like pastel hand towels (to match 
the elegant coloring in your bathroom) or floral coffee 
cups For boyfriends, gifts could range from chick flicks to 
tickets for a local musical or opera 

In the beginning, be careful not to give presents that 
might come off as too girly or anything that is too personal or 
to your liking, For example, it's probably not a good idea to 
give your boyfriend a pink Hello Kitty robe, he might catch on 
to your devious scheming 

However, if things go as planned, the men in your life will 
smirk and grimace in confusion and possible disgust ai the 
pretty presents you have bequeathed to them Most likely, they 
will thank you for the gift and toss it aside Once it has left their 
fingers, it's up (or the grabbing and you've just earned another 
item in your Christmas loot pile. 

After some experience and a few Christmases under your belt, 
you can begin sneaking in much larger items These could range 
from season tick els to the ballet or a year's membership to a yoga 
studio 

A forewarning though: be sure to pick up a few goods truK 
intended for the receiver For instance, alongside the manicure 
and pedicure gift certificate, slide in some video games and other 
electronic bootv 

Don't ever abuse or take advantage of your new 
dexterity If someone discovers your sneaky efficiency, your 
true colors will shine through and you'll forever he regard 
ed as lewd and hedonistic 



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Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



GIFT GUIDE 



Page 7 



1 f^l 



10 gifts less 
than $10 



1 Margarita mix gift set 
Set includes: one liter of margaiita 
mix, bag of rimming salt and two mat- 
gjntd glasses Sold at Wal Mart for $t 94 
ftequlla sold separately.) 

2 TAG "Player Pad" gift set 
Set includes: two TAG body sprays, 25 
professional quality poker chips and one 
professional deck of cards Sold at Wal 
Mart for $6.84. 

3 The Color Workshop "Modern 
Beauty gift set 

Set includes: several shades of blush, eye 
shadow, lipyiick, lip liner and lip gloss, nail 
polish, pencil sharpener, eye liner, pocket 
limmt mascara and glush brush Sold at 
Wal Marl for $8.87. 

4 "Hot Rock" lava lamp by Multi 
•Media Electronks 

Sold in colors of green and blue or pink and 
purple Sold at Wal-Mart for $9,82. 

5 Memory Foam neck cushion 
Neck vibration for pressure point relief 
and the cushion fomis to the contours of 
the netk Sold at Wal-Mart for $9.94. 



Boring gifts can 
cause holiday woes 



By Sheila Ellis 

KANSAS SUIFCOI I EGIAN 

The holiday season il righl 
around the OOlTUr, and for many 
i$ a familiar nos 
i.dgia thai tomes to mind when 
people think OJ the word Christ- 
mas decorated trees, family, egg 

nog and Santa Ciutl 

But. each year, many people 
have complained about losing 

the excitement built up all > 

on Christmas morning by open 
ing the same routine Cfltppj 
present every year. 

The friend or l';nmly member 

Who every y you the 

.iii ie thing might be suffering 

;t fictitious disease called 

the "common gift syndrome." 

The symptoms ol If i 

la /in ess and lack of creativity 

People seem to want to give 

BIS things they need Of what 
they think is needed For exam- 
ple, those lovely red -striped tube 

ks that aunt Sally gives you 
every year 

"Every year 1 get a stocking 
that always has money, sinks 
and a CO in it." said Tommy 
Smith freshman in pre-profes- 
smnal business administration 

Sometimes it can be hard for 
people to tell a loved one (hat 
I heir choice of gifts are some- 
thing you already have enough 
of or something thai they plain 
out just don't like 

"I always gel a makeup kit for 
Christinas I don't know why I 

gims my mom |ust thinks i need 
new makeup kil every year but 
ill I wear is eye shadow any 
Prise ilia Cano. freshman 
in pre medicine, said 

Then there are ihe people 
who buy everyone on the list the 
exact same item, because it is 
just convenient 



"I get everyone on my list a 
magazine subscription to 'heir 
■Li'- maga aid Lori 
Wilkersoii. freshman in pre-pro- 
fessiortal business administra- 
tion "It's s ithing they can 

have and enjoy all . 

Some people are iust easier 

to simp icir because I hey have a 
fetish for a certain item or have 
specific interests. 

"1 am a big movie fan," said 
Caleb Utgsbv, .senior in second- 
ary education "I get movie pass- 
es and I get gift certificates fmm 
tin- Digital Shelf. 

by said he gets a new Pea 
dispense! even year so it has 

ime a tradition lor the past 
eight id he now has a 

collection 

Due in this "common giftsvn- 
etaii stores usually i 
i he same Hems every year during 
I In 1 1 "In; t-ur example 

a common gift for women is pel 
fume, lotions and body tpi 
si i many stores have sales on 
these items 

'Most popuku Items tor the 
season k oui \'i. toria'i S 

its and also oui Pink Col 
lection sweats and rob 
Amanda Hinge), sales lead at 
victoria's Secret. 

Another common gift for Hie 

■ m are cold winter items like 

heavy winter coats scarves, mit- 
ten, gloves, sweaters and p 
mas. 

These items can be found at 
stores such as American Eagle 
and Aeropostale and mart) other 

StOh 

"Every year, mc, mv brother 
and sister always get new paje 
llias. Wc get lo open our Clin si 
mas pajamas o» Christmas I ve 

si i we can wear them Chnstmas 
morning.' Brfal Klein, frevh i 

in pre-nursing, said 



6 Perfect Christmas Small Scented 
Candle 

In frosted cranberry, spice and tree. Sold at 
Bath «r Body Works for $10 each 

7 Anthony Logistics for Men 
Glycerin hand and body lotion. Sold at 
Bath& BodyWorks for $10 

8 Fragrant Body Care Body Lotion in 
several different stents 

Sold at Bath & Body Works, $9 for an eight- 
ounce bottle. 

9 Cartoons from the New Yorker, 
Sudoku Classic and Bad Cat day to 
day 2006 calendars 

Cartoons from the New Yorker and Sudoku 
Classic both $9 59 and Bad Cat for $8 76 
All three sold at ama20n.com. 

1 rt Pass the Pigs Deluxe Edition 

I w A portable qame of chance; the 
position the hogs landtn determines your 
stoie. Soldatama20n.com lot $9.99. 

* Prices do not include ta« 
Compiled by Eileen lain 
Kansas Stale Collegian 



Need something to do? 

Try SuDoku 



L.«KAl*«f Of*. |h« 



sudoku 



cU»**>m**H f»*Q» 



College budgets afford good taste 







_r 


\ 


Meatballs 




h ~^s* 




Ingredients: 


(sauce) 


1 >^ 




(meatballs) 


-lean of 


V adkW^u. 




-1 pound ol 


tomato soup 


AA JEM 




hamburger, 


1 package of 


M ttesw f^ 




uncooked 
legg 

WHO wit 


instant onion 
soup mix 
2 lablespoom 


WEST ~1i 




-1/4 tsp pepper 


of brown sugar 




1 slice of bread 


1 teaspoon of 


Mix together Ingredients for meat balls. 


finely chopped 


Worcestershire 


Shape into halls and place in a 9 x 13 


(this works belter 


sauce 


pan Mix together sauce and pour over 


ilrhp bread is 


- 1 Tablespoon 


the meatballs. Bake at 350 degrees for 


fry] 


of vinegar 


50-60 minutes. 



By Kelly Sthmitt 

KUSAssnn >.oiih.ian 

College student! aren't often known in have huge budgets to 
buy Christmas A great alternative to purchasing gifts is u fes- 
live meal to celebrate good company BOd I'netidshlp. 
Since budgets are tight, it's a great opportunity for each person 
lo purchase the ingredients lor a particular dish Conversation ac- 
companies the preparation process enhanced while sipping some 

hot cranberry lea. 

If "real" dishes are not available, use some colorful paper plates, 
napkins and cups They aren't much more expensive than regular 
paper plates arid they will help set the holiday mood 

When all the food is laid out on the table, H*s time to sit down 
and enjoy great conversation, companionship ami friendship 







_y 


>v 






y ^ 


Crock Pot Corn 




Fruit Salad 




. -^ 




Ingredients: 


-1 teaspoon 






Ingredients: 


-Icupofminia 


, 




-l pound of 


of salt 






-lean of 


tare marshmal- 






frozen corn 


- J /4 teaspoon 






fruit cocktail, 


lows 


jt—^^^t 




4 uunres of 


ol pepper 


±± ^ 




drained 


1 cups of 


Kkflrtkf M 




cream cheese 




^^iK- 




1 small pack- 


whipped tup- 


W9T 


W cup of 




^>*^ 




age ol vanilla 


ping 




whipping cream 




fcs^ r»J 




insianl pudding 






or half and half 




aML^ 




-Ismail can of 




Mix fruit cocktail, oranges and in slant 


-2 tablespoons 




■■■■ML*^ 




Mandarin or 




judding until thickened Add the marsh 


of sugar 








anges, drained 




mallows Slice the banana and mix in 


-1/2 cup of sour 




Combine Ingredients in crock-pot. Cook 




1 banana 




f old in the whipped topping Refrigerate 


tream 




on low for four hours, or high for two 
hours. Check and stir periodically 








mixi ure until ready lo serve 



r 



A 



Kansas Dirt Cake 




Ingredients: 

1 1 pound package 

of Oreo Cookies 

8 ounces of cream 

cheese 

1/2 cup of margarine 

1 cup of powdered 

sugar 



1 medium container 
of whipped topping 

2 small boxes of 
vanilla instant 
pudding 

3 cups of milk 

1 teaspoon of vanilla 



Crush the cookies. This can be done quickly in a blender or food processor Spread 
half of the crumbs in the bottom of a 9 x I s pan. Mix the cream cheese and 
margarine together until smooth Add the powdered sugar. Blend in the whipped 
topping. In a separate bowl, mix the pudding, milk and vanilla togethet until 
thickened. Stir both mixtures together and pour over the crumbs Spread the 
remaining crumbs on top Add gummy worms to the top, if desired Refrigerate 
until ready to serve. 



r 



Cranberry Tea 

Ingredients: 

1 cup of sugar 

3 cinnamon 
sticks 

-2 quarts 'i( 
walei 

I quart of 
cranberry juice 

\ tablespoons 
of lemon juice 
-6 ounces ol 
frozen orange 
juice 




%* j 



Heal ingredients toqether in a large pan on a burner 
Allow lo simmer, but do not boil. Serve hot leftovers 
should be refrigerated and can be reheated 



Manhattan shops available for gift giving 



By EilMfl Uux 

KANWS51ATECDIUUAN 

Chnstmas shopping can be a 
difficult tjsk. hut local business- 
es arc trying to help by offering 
different gifts foi ( onsumers 

Sophomore in mass com- 
munications Inn Sdmler, sales 
associate at lems Gift, 612 N 
12th St 1 said Acme sells a wide 
variety Ol gills 

"We sell just about anything 
' t i.j i you wouldn't normally get 
for Christinas," he said. "Our 
gilts are very unique and suits 
anyone y>U are shopping for 
with any budget you ha 

He said the general price 

range is very broad They sell 

"( 25 cents, bul also have 

bean bags for $200. 

Schuler said the store will 



have more promotions al a later 
date as it gets closer to Christ 
mas lime, but business 
just beginning to pick up 

"We are getting the store 
as packed and stocked as pos- 
sible, so we Can be ready when 
it starts to get crazy," he said. 

Jeff Levin, owner of Varney s 

Book Store. h2s N Manhattan 
Ave . said there are a number 
of sales in the technical supply 
area and children's sections 

These are not |ust the run- 
of-the-mill toys," he said "They 
are designed to stimulate B 
child's mind and are great for 
students that have younger sib 
lings or cousins 

He said since K- State will 
not go to a bowl game, Vamey's 
is running deals on K-Slate gear 
The shop is expecting a large 



rush because ihe economy is 

gelling stronger, gas prices are 

stabilizing and no i"'"«l games 
will create .1 large] disposable 
income, 

We have covered ihe lull 

rum of the rainbow," he 
said "I Ink is the new black The 
colors will fit their K- State iden 

■ matter what n 
is" 

ve Montoya, manager ol 
KrystaJloa, said the 

s in leweJrj sterling silvei 
and win id 

She said they have many 
clothing brands and tn exclu- 
sive handbag line Inuii Boulder, 
Colo People cut Hi 

■I hodv can products and 



oilier little gifts at this sti 
Krystallos sells « 

!, toapi in holi- 
day scents, holid 

'urn 
Our pi . is very 

Montoya said "W 

ngt th.it people 
liked in iln old store, bul we 
i both 
clothing and jewelry.' 

Montoya said there will be 
■ ■ right now 

and she is hopn . nence 

hopping rush 
"I have a lew holiday shop 
pen, bul mure holiday, lookers 

than anything else" she said 
at: it to pick up 
after 1 hanksgr* 



Mwm • Boss • jackson 

fender • tpiphone 

Crate • J&anez 



Guitar RepQir 
Buitar Lessons 



Music Shop 



Life is 

,-.,j „.I.LI- / 



Holidazzl 

•-, Give yaur&lja httie G(jfz (3) 

$5 OiT 



EVERYONE 

*+* • Jewelry 

• Lingerie 

• Imports 

• Posters 

• Stocking Sniffers 

Men's & Women's Cto tiling 

715N.12THSTRECT 

587-1819 




Page 8 



GIFT GUIDE 



Monday, Nov. 28, 2005 



Shopping in the E-age 

Online holiday shopping makes gift-giving easy, convenient 





By Amy Bolton 
KANSAS mn COLLEGIAN 

Instead of driving to the mall, 
fighting traffic in the stores and 
waiting in line to pay, many 
people are choosing to do their 
holiday shopping online. 

Web sites such as Amazon 
com, uBay.com, Overstock, 
com and individual stores' Web 
sites offer many options from 
the convenience of a personal 
computer. 

lenny Collins, senior in mar- 
keting, said she shops online 
for both gifts for others and 
things for herself 

"I bought something for my 
boyfriend on eBay" Collins 
said 

She also said she likes to 
shop early for Christmas gifts 
when shopping online. 

"If you start looking now, 



you can probably save money 
instead of waiting until the last 
minute," Collins said, 

In addition to eBay. Collins 
said she shops at Overstock, 
com, Amazon com and cloth- 
ing stores such as Forever21. 
com 

Lindsey Hunt, assistant man- 
ager at The Gap in the Manhat- 
tan Town Center and senior in 
marketing, said online shop- 
ping at Gap com is very com- 
mon among customers 

"It's pretty popular," Hunt 
said. "We do a lot of online or- 
ders in the store" 

She said online shopping 
has decreased the foot traffic in 
the store. 

"Probably because custom- 
ers are starting to order online 
from their homes because it's 
more convenient," she said 

There are many advantages 



Qtmt mn i<* 

Holiday Special 

*25 



i 





•Gift Certificates 
•30% OFF All Lotions 
•Discounts on all packages 

10 Kimball Ave. 




B*>™ 



••